ADF

Hugh Hewitt: President Trump and the 2020 Election


President Trump will win reelection. Anyone who watched his presser after the midterms knows in his or her bones that it’s gonna happen, because he’s getting better and better at the job.

He’s spent two years learning the job to which he brought a communications skill set unmatched by any other commander in chief, except Ronald Reagan.

Nobody is better at “combative” than Trump, and we live in an age addicted to combativeness. Cable news has adopted sports-like coverage and monetized combativeness. The culture is built on combativeness.

The president is also getting better and better at the policy and performance aspects of the presidency, getting better on the details even as he sharpens his jousting skills.

If Trump repopulates his front bench with a talented supporting cast of people who would amplify rather than muffle his message, he’ll be unstoppable in 2020.

Of course that could change, but right now you just have to say: he is the prohibitive favorite.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Hurting the Press the President and the Country


Jim Acosta, the aggressively arrogant reporter for CNN, posed a recent question illustrating the biggest problem with the press.

The day after midterm elections, Acosta grilled the president by saying: “I want to challenge you on one of the statements that you made… that this caravan was an ‘invasion’ … As you know, Mr. President, the caravan was not an invasion.”

Now, if Acosta had quoted Nancy Pelosi or Chuck Schumer and then asked the president’s response, it would have been fair and appropriate, but it’s not a reporter’s job to “challenge” an official in his own name and his own voice.

Why not explore disagreements among politicians, without taking sides yourself? The undisguised anti-Trump contempt by leading journalists supports the idea that the nation’s biggest battle isn’t Democrats vs. Republicans, it’s the media vs. Trump: an impression that hurts the press, the president, and the country.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Something for Both Sides to Celebrate


The mid-term elections provided a rare occasion for conservatives and liberals, Republicans and Democrats, to look at the same events and feel a shared sense of satisfaction and encouragement.

Republicans feel good about expanding their Senate majority and holding key governorships in Florida, Ohio, and elsewhere. Democrats take pride in capturing the House and flipping governorships in Illinois, Michigan and more. Republicans won big races in deep blue states like Massachusetts and Vermont; Democrats gained ground in GOP strongholds like Kansas and South Carolina.

Americans know how to split tickets: in Maryland, Republican Governor Larry Hogan and Democratic Senator Ben Cardin both won simultaneous landslides.

The election returns show that Americans still care most about local issues plus the character and competence of their candidates.

Read More »

Mid-Terms Reveal a Split Decision


Townhall Review – November 10, 2018

A look at the election with Hugh Hewitt and Robert Costa, National Political Reporter for the Washington PostDennis Prager looks at the Democratic spin on the election with John Fund, columnist for National Review. The gloves are off as the Democrats are again calling for “Impeachment.” Congressman Mike Gallagher talks with Hugh Hewitt. Salem host Mike Gallagher gives his analysis of the vote the day after the midterms. Dennis Prager speaks with Alliance Defending Freedom Senior Legal Counsel Kate Anderson about a case in Anchorage, Alaska involving a women’s shelter. Hugh Hewitt talks with Tyler Spady, a survivor of the mass shooting at the Borderline bar in Thousand Oaks, California. Michael Medved asks why “hate speech” is acceptable on CNN, or anywhere else.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: The Courts and the Fight for the First Amendment


The Supreme Court in the U.K. recently decided unanimously in favor of a bakery in Belfast where they declined to make a cake celebrating same-sex marriage.

You may think it sounds similar to the case of Jack Phillips here in our country.

That’s because it is.

Here at home, of course, Jack won at our high court—by a 7-2 margin in the Masterpiece Cakeshop decision, defended by the good folks at ADF, the Alliance Defending Freedom.

Jack’s story, the story of the U.K., the story of Baronelle Stutzman—the florist up in Washington state— all are just examples of how widespread these free speech and free exercise of religion issues are today.

The courts—at least for the foreseeable future—are the first and last line of defense for what our founders called “The First Freedom.”

The good folks need to stay fully engaged in the fight.

Read More »