A Terrifying Chapter in Austin and a First Amendment Battle at the Supreme Court

Townhall Review — March 24, 2018

Mike Gallagher talks about the Austin, TX bombing as well as this week’s shooting incident at a Great Mills, Maryland school that was minimized by a fast-acting, courageous officer. Veteran FBI profiler James Fitzgerald, goes inside the mind of the Austin bomber, just like he did with Ted Kaczynski, the Unabomber, who he helped stop. Michael Medved invites ADF President Michael Farris to share the latest on an important Supreme Court case with huge First Amendment implications. Julianne Benzel sits in with Dennis Prager to share about how her suggestion of having students protest abortion backfired. Larry Elder turns to Jesse Lee Peterson, a South Los Angeles community leader, author and radio host to talk about Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, and his recent racial taunts against whites and Jews. Hugh Hewitt invites Jon Erwin, producer of “I Can Only Imagine” to share about his experience making the faith-based movie.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: A Law Compelling Speech

An important case before the Supreme Court this week points back to 2015, when the legislature in California adopted a law requiring crisis pregnancy centers to articulate an explicitly pro-abortion message right down to how women could contact the state about financial assistance in obtaining an abortion.

In short: It’s a law compelling speech.

Ilya Shapiro, representing the CATO institute, points out that it’s extremely telling that California has no comparable law requiring abortion providers to post advertisements for adoption agencies, or any other alternative to abortion.

We’re about to find out in short order if the justices of the United States Supreme Court mean what they say when they pledge to uphold the constitution of the United States—a constitution that includes the right of a citizen not to have a government coerce speech against conviction.

Read More »

David Davenport: Another Shot Fired in California’s Civil War

California is stepping closer to a civil war with the federal government over immigration. In the latest round, one day after President Trump visited the state to see prototypes of his border wall, the state senate appointed an illegal immigrant to serve on a state commission, a big step in California’s progressive history.

Lizbeth Mateo, an undocumented immigrant from Mexico, was appointed to the state’s Student Opportunity and Access Program Project Advisory Committee.  Perhaps, as a lawyer who advocates for immigration rights, she would have a perspective to share as a witness before a state commission, but as a member? There’s no legal basis for that and it is a further effort by California to tweak the Trump administration.

Unfortunately, the rule of law is rarely raised anymore in debates about immigration policy. Tweaking Trump is just a bad approach to public policy.

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: Poland on the Verge of a Big Mistake

I’m a huge admirer of Poland. I love the way they have embraced their national identity, including their Christian heritage.

As an investor in Poland, I have admired their embrace of human productivity which helped to make Poland the best performing market in the world last year.

But this wonderful nation may be on the verge of a big mistake. It has passed a law which would illegalize speech about the small role which Polish collaborators played in the holocaust. Israeli leaders have reached out and officials from both nations are meeting in Jerusalem to discuss it, while Poland reconsiders this law.

Pope John Paul II, perhaps Poland’s greatest gift to the world, probably did more than any Pope in history to heal the relationship between Catholicism and Judaism. His compatriots should follow his great example.

Read More »

David Davenport: The Rise of Millennial Voters

A wave of change is coming in the 2018 and 2020 elections:  the rise of millennial voters.  In those elections, millennials, born between 1980-2000, will finally pass baby boomers as the largest voting generation.

What we know is that millennials hold different political views than their boomer parents.  They are more fearful, saying 4-1 that America is on the wrong track.  They believe less in political institutions such as Congress and the President.  They are more open to socialism, less committed to freedom. Seventy-one percent say we need a new political party.

What we don’t know is how many millennials will actually show up to vote.  So far, their voting percentage is low:  only half or less of eligible voters in 2016.

It seems likely that millennial concerns will change the conversation in future elections, but we’ll have to wait and see whether they actually vote and change the outcome.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Partisanship Trumps Policy in Reacting to North Korea

Reactions to White House plans to meet with Kim Jong-Un highlight the damaging impact of partisan polarization and obsessive Trump hatred.

Had Barack Obama arranged to negotiate with the brutal North Korean dictator, some of the same Democrats now deriding Trump would have hailed their hero as a bold visionary, deserving of a second Nobel prize.

Some of the voices that blamed Trump for incendiary rhetoric leading toward needless war now attack him for reckless concessions in pursuit of peace. Of course, this new initiative could still collapse in a U.S. setback, but Americans should give the president broad support to strengthen his hand. Yes, Trump true-believers can sometimes embarrass themselves by claiming the president can do no wrong, but his die-hard critics damage our politics by insisting that he can do no right.

Read More »