ADF

Michael Medved: To Hold Power, GOP Must Win State-by-State Battles


To hold the Senate and White House in 2020’s upcoming battle royal, Republicans must focus on state-by-state results, not the ups and downs in national opinion polls. In 2018’s midterms, Republicans lost 40 House seats, 7 governorships and 22 of 33 U.S. Senate races.

In overwhelmingly conservative states like North Dakota, Indiana, and Missouri, Republican Senate candidates prevailed, as they did in one key swing state: Florida. But in other must-win states that Donald Trump carried last time—Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Arizona—Republican Senate challengers flopped.

They also lost in deep red West Virginia and Montana, while carrying Texas in just a squeaker. To retain power in the Senate and Electoral College, the GOP needs a more positive, pragmatic problem-solving approach to broaden the party’s base.

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Dan Proft: de Blasio’s Revealing Word on Money


“Brothers and sisters, there’s plenty of money in the world. There’s plenty of money in this city. It’s just in the wrong hands.”

Those are the words of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio as he was introducing his plan for single-payer, government-run health care in New York City.

de Blasio’s use of the phrase “brothers and sisters” is instructive as it is religious.  As G.K. Chesterton observed, when people lose their faith in the Almighty, they don’t believe in nothing. They believe in anything. Rather than an omniscient God, more place their faith in an omnipotent state and bishops of big government like de Blasio.

Being a Socialist in the 20th century meant never having to account for the body count.

Today, it means De Blasio’s political self-interest is nobler than your economic self-interest—understanding that when he says money is in the “wrong hands,” he may well be talking about yours.

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Lanhee Chen: Don’t Expect This Impasse to End Anytime Soon

A funny thing has happened to Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, and other Democrats on their way to opposing President Trump’s border wall.  They’ve forgotten their own past.

Time and again, Democrats have voted to fund border security. And, just a few weeks ago, they agreed to spend nearly $2 billion toward construction of the very physical barrier that President Trump has repeatedly called for.

But now, Pelosi calls the wall an “immorality” that is the “least effective way to protect the border.” And she, along with Schumer, have drawn a line in the sand by saying that they will oppose any funding for the wall.

But if a physical barrier at our southern border is such an immorality, do they want to tear down the hundreds of miles of border fencing that already exist along the US-Mexico border?

Don’t expect an answer to this question anytime soon.

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Michael Medved: Impeachment Dreams, National Nightmares


Democratic impeachment dreams will inevitably collide with a Constitution that makes removal of a president all but impossible. With the current Senate line-up, Democrats would need to persuade 20 Republicans to join all 47 of them for the two-thirds vote to drive Trump from office.

In 232 years of Constitutional history, no US Senator—not even one—has ever voted to remove a president of his or her own party. What happened to Richard Nixon in 1974? The Watergate crisis climaxed in the midst of a midterm election campaign; a campaign in which the GOP ultimately lost 48 House seats and 5 in the Senate.

In a desperate bid to mitigate looming disaster, Senate leaders begged Nixon to resign. For the sake of his party and his country, he did so. In Trump’s case, elections are nearly two years away and, barring unforeseen, catastrophic revelations, his resignation is inconceivable.

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Jerry Bowyer: Economic Growth and American Greatness


It appears that the economy is slowing down and that markets are signaling even further weakening. I’ve been an economic optimist since the Trump election—especially when he made broad-based tax cuts a priority. But I did warn that the effects of the tax cuts would be short-term unless he continued to push in a pro-growth direction.

But after the cuts, the president instead pivoted towards increasing taxes on international trade. Make no mistake: tariffs are taxes. And as such, they choke growth.

And that’s exactly what has been happening.

Economic growth has gone from a sizzling summer of over 4 percent to an average fall at under 3 1/2 percent and the winter looks like it might be cooling down to under 3 percent.

If—in the president’s language—we want to make America great again—and we really want to beat China, growth is the way to do it.

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