Albert Mohler: Childlessness And The Future Of Europe

The rise of childlessness is reaching increasingly alarming levels in Europe.

The Economist recently noted that “just 9 percent of English and Welsh women born in 1946 had no children. But, for the cohort born in 1970, the proportion is 17 percent. But now in Germany, 22 percent of women reach their early 40s without children; in the German city of Hamburg 32 percent do.”

The fact is, no society can survive without an adequate number of children being born, and that there is a very real prospect, as we already see in a nation like Japan, the childlessness leads to an eventual demographic and economic disaster.

The Economist, however, defends childlessness saying, “The childless are thus a small but useful counterweight to the world’s parents, who perpetuate social immobility by passing on their social and economic advantages to their children.”

Let me just point out that the only way to resolve that passing on of what’s identified here as social immobility is for the society to come to an absolute end through childlessness. That’s the embrace of nihilism.

Let’s face it for what it is.