Albert Mohler: The Memory of Tiananmen; The Face of Communism

This week marked the 30th anniversary of one of the darkest days of the 20th century: On June 4, 1989 guns were fired and the tanks rolled against students who had assembled in China in historic Tiananmen Square in Beijing.

The students had begun gathering in mid-April, sensing what they thought was a cease in the political openness within China. They called for a multi-party system, rights for students, freedom of assembly and freedom of the press.

Western media were captivated by these courageous young protestors.

But in the hours between June 3 and 4, the Chinese Communist Party announced it was going to eliminate the protest.

Western estimates of the dead students range from several hundred to the far more credible several thousands.

There is one basic historical lesson of Tiananmen Square, and that is this: A Communist party in a one-party state does not give up its control without blood.