Albert Mohler: The Preconditions for Constructive Political Change

The widespread rioting and looting we’ve witnessed in the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer highlight the need for stability and trust in the achievement of justice.

In the United States, the act of political protest has often led to constructive political change, but rioting never has. And the more widespread and the more violent the rioting, the more negative the political effects have been over time.

The United States Constitution guarantees citizens the right to a redress of grievances.

But there are preconditions that are necessary—the first is a stable order in which justice can actually take place. The second is the kind of trust, social trust, that is necessary for any effort at achieving even approximate justice.

If you take out stability, if you eliminate order, and if you erode social trust, the accomplishment of justice becomes well-nigh impossible.