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Michael Medved: Caravans and Shutdowns: Both Unpopular


This is Michael Medved of MichaelMedved.com for Townhall.

Congressional Democrats made a mistake to attack President Trump for his determined opposition to caravans of unauthorized immigrants at our Southern border. Automatic asylum would only encourage new thousands to make a dangerous, illegal trek.

But President Trump also makes a mistake by touting a pointless government shutdown, which might seem bold and decisive but raises the inevitable question, “what next?” The Democrats, with their newly elected House majority, won’t simply surrender and a shutdown hurts the government, the public’s faith in democracy, even our economy.

The only possible outcome is some form of compromise: no, the president won’t get all the money he wants for a wall, but he will get increased funding for enhanced border security. Since it’s obvious that both caravans and shutdowns are deeply unpopular, Congress and the president should drop the games and work out common sense reforms that can help all sides.

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Michael Medved: Turning Critics Into Admirers


The outpouring of admiration for the late President George Herbert Walker Bush largely ignores his troubled history with the press: Like all Republican presidents of the last 50 years, Bush endured carping, contemptuous treatment.

One highly critical reporter, Ann Devroy of the Washington Post, was surprised to receive a handwritten letter after her cancer diagnosis in 1996. The then-former president candidly acknowledged a “tension that clouded things between us… I was the out of touch President, the wimp; you were the beltway insider…. but strangely, wonderfully, I feel close to you now. I want you to win this battle. I want that same toughness that angered me and frustrated me to a fare-thee-well at times to see you through your fight.” Sadly, Devroy lost her fight the next year, but Bush’s graceful gesture highlighted his ability to turn critics into admirers. Every American should cherish and develop that precious capacity.

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Albert Mohler: An Alarming New Standard


Transgender activists are now arguing that that the only prerequisite for surgery ought to be the simple desire of the patient to have the surgery … their wanting it.

The story comes from the New York Times with a headline, “Surgery, hormones but not happiness.” The author is a man who is going to be undergoing what is defined as sex reassignment or gender reassignment surgery.

He writes candidly: “This is what I want. But there is no guarantee it will make me happier. In fact, I don’t expect it to,” he writes. “That shouldn’t disqualify me from getting it.”

So: He’s pursuing surgery even as he acknowledges it might not alleviate pain and that it might even lead to greater pain. He’s arguing for a medical/ethical principle that this kind of surgery and any surgery should be available to an individual simply because the individual wants it.

It’s an alarming and unsustainable new standard.

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Dan Proft: Save Asia Bibi


The most profound action related to immigration President Trump can take at present has nothing to do with walls, troops or 9th Circuit pronouncements.

It’s to extend religious asylum to a Pakistani woman named Asia Bibi and her family. You may have heard her story: Bibi survived eight years in a Pakistani gulag with the prospect of execution hanging over her head like the Sword of Damocles each day.

Her crime: being a Christian.

The Pakistani Supreme Court acquitted her, and declared her innocent.

Since being released, she and her family are under constant threat of assassination by the Islamofascists who’ve overrun Pakistan.

In a shameful episode of cowardice, self-declared pluralists in the West have turned a deaf ear to Bibi.

The administration should provide a tutorial for Trump-haters and the DC press corps on the difference between economic migrants and asylum-seekers.

We should provide her—and her family—asylum immediately.

Mr. President, save Asia Bibi.

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Michael Medved: An Occasion That Was Powerfully, Unashamedly Christian

The National Cathedral funeral service for the late President George Herbert Walker Bush was as noble and remarkable as the good man it honored. Every speaker offered words of wisdom and insight to inspire Americans for generations to come. Former Senator Alan Simpson honored the late president’s love of laughter and noted that “Humor is the universal solvent against the abrasive elements of life” while “Hatred corrodes the container it’s carried in.” He also praised his friend’s rare character, observing that “those who travel the high road of humility in Washington, D.C. are not bothered by heavy traffic.”

But beyond the eloquence and pageantry, the occasion conveyed a powerful message: the event was proudly, powerfully, unashamedly  Christian. The hymns and prayers served as a reminder that neither the Bush family nor the nation it served, has ever been secular, or in any way uncomfortable with a deep, abiding faith.

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