ADF

Hugh Hewitt: The Court, the Culture and the Meaning of “Sex”


Back in 1964 Congress passed and LBJ signed the Civil Rights Act.

It was landmark legislation, hastening as it did the end of segregation, a dark era in our nation’s history.

Title VII of that Act prohibited employment discrimination on the basis of, “race, color, religion, national origin, or sex.”

In our contemporary politics, there’s an effort to redefine and re-load what that word “sex” means. Is it something objective?—grounded in biological realties? Or is it simply what an individual says it is?

ADF—the Alliance Defending Freedom—is fighting a case in Michigan that could soon be before the nation’s highest court based on exactly this: Can we take away an objective grounds of “sex”—“male” and “female”—without an act of Congress?

The stakes in the law and in the culture could not be higher.

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Accusations Against Kavanaugh and Prospects for Confirmation


Townhall Review – September 22, 2018

As the Democrats launch a last-minute effort to derail the Kavanaugh confirmation, Hugh Hewitt talks with Senator Grassley about the possible testimony of Kavanaugh’s accuser, Christine Ford. Mike Gallagher and Ed Morrissey examine the latest details. Hugh Hewitt solicits the opinion of Congresswoman Martha McSally of Arizona on the hearing and talks about the congresswoman’s campaign for the U.S. Senate. Michael Medved looks at Seattle’s rampant homelessness and the direction Seattle’s government is heading to address the problem. Mike Gallagher looks at job growth among the “underclass” with Alfredo Ortiz, President of the Job Creators Network. Hugh Hewitt talks with Bob Woodward about his new book, Fear on the Trump Administration. Michael Medved talks with journalist James Robbins about his new book, Erasing America: Losing our Future by Destroying our Past. Larry Elder reacts to a leaked video of a Google “all-hands” meeting shortly after President Trump’s election victory.

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Michael Medved: Senate Must Resist a Last-Ditch Smear


In their desperate attempt to smear Judge Brett Kavanaugh, many left-leaning commentators try to connect him to #MeToo malefactors like Harvey Weinstein.

For two reasons, this association is utterly unfair.

First, the #MeToo villains all exploited positions of power; Kavanaugh was a 17-year-old high school junior at the time of his alleged misdeeds.
Second, all the #MeToo villains were guilty of mistreating multiple women, sometimes hundreds; in Judge Kavanaugh’s case, he’s accused of mistreating only one woman, on a single occasion.
The timing of the accusations is also highly suspect.

If Senators allow this shady maneuver to succeed, they will shift our politics from merely ugly to outrageously unjust.

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Albert Mohler: Reagan’s Plea to His Dying Father-in-Law


Late in the summer of 1982, President Ronald Reagan had a lot on his mind. He faced challenges at home and around the world. But on this August day, the 40th President of the United States had something even more pressing on his mind. His father in law, Dr. Loyal Davis, was dying, and Dr. Davis was an avowed atheist. President Reagan wrote an incredible letter that day to his father in law, pleading with him to trust Christ.

He told his father in law that Jesus is the very Son of God, writing, “Either he was who he said he was, or he was the greatest faker and charlatan who ever lived.”

President Reagan went on to cite John 3:16 in his plea to his father in law.

Karen Tumulty of the Washington Post recently came across the letter while conducting research at the Reagan Library. It is one of the most remarkable presidential documents of modern times.

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Michael Medved: Curled Up In a Ball of White Shame


A student at an elite university recently wrote to the New York Times: “I’m riddled with shame. White Shame … I feel like my literal existence hurts people, like I’m always taking up space that should belong to someone else … Instead of harnessing my privilege for greater good, I’m curled up in a ball of shame.”

This unfortunate student illustrates the destructive insanity in teaching personal guilt over so-called “white privilege.” In previous generations, the idea that their skin color made them less worthy than others proved devastating to black people; now some young whites are encouraged to “curl up in a ball of shame.”

As Dr. King made clear, in a decent society, individuals must be judged—and must judge themselves—on the content of their character, not the color of their skin.

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