Author Archives: THAdmin

Jerry Bowyer: How Important is Our Common History?

Roger Kimball was quoted recently in Imprimis Magazine, making a pithy observation on the state of higher education: “The more expensive education becomes the more it seems to lead, not to broader understanding, but to narrower horizons.”

Kimball marveled at the removal of a picture of Shakespeare from University of Pennsylvania’s English Department in favor of a photo of Audre Lorde—a black feminist writer. The Department Chairman gushed over the students’ courage to replace it: “they were committed to a more inclusive mission,” he said for the department.

But the rest of us might ask: “OK, but how long will the replacement photo be tolerated?” This trend towards erasing history is not slowing down.

What’s the next step? Bans on Broadway revivals of Neal Simon or Arthur Miller? Persecution of bookstores for selling non-PC books?

Defenders of our common history’s heroes and benefactors should speak out now. Your local libraries and museums may be the next target.

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Senate Forced to Go Nuclear to Get Vote on Judges

Townhall Review – April 6, 2019

Hugh Hewitt talks with Ohio Senator Rob Portman on the Senate’s implementation of the “nuclear option” to get President Trump’s nominations moving. Hugh Hewitt and journalist Salena Zito discuss the film “Unplanned” and Hollywood’s resistance to pro-life efforts. Hugh Hewitt talks with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo about State Department efforts to gain the release of those Americans being held by hostile countries. Mike Gallagher examines the troubles faced by Democrat presidential candidate hopeful Joe Biden and the Democrats apparent attempt to derail his candidacy. Larry Elder talks with Sally Pipes of the Pacific Research Institute about the lawsuits triggered by Obamacare. Dennis Prager discusses with documentary filmmaker Ami Horowitz efforts by the Left to bring back racial separation on college campuses. Mike Gallagher speaks with Florida Senator Marco Rubio about the many issues facing those who monitor our southern border.

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Albert Mohler: The Social Media Revolution

A new study reveals a correlation between the social media engagement of teens and loneliness.

The headline in USA Today: “Teens aren’t socializing in the real world. And that’s making them super lonely.”

The story tells us that research into 8.2 million adolescents found that the percentage of high school seniors who said they often feel lonely has increased from 26 percent in 2012 to 39 percent in 2017.

So: In just five years we’ve seen more than a double-digit increase in high school seniors who often feel lonely in the digital age.

If this is true of seniors in high school, what must it say about their younger siblings, their cousins and their friends? There must be an even greater vulnerability as this report makes clear.

Perhaps the term “social media” has been misleading all along … and maybe the social media revolution was never merely a technological revolution, but also a moral revolution. That’s a fact we dare not miss.

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Dan Proft: “Completely Corrupt” Chicago

In 1952, Alderman Robert Merriam remarked to journalist A.J. Liebling that Chicago “is the only completely corrupt city in America.”

That hasn’t changed in the dismissal of charges against Jussie Smollett.

Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx is one of the Socialist Spice Girls put together by Michelle Obama’s top lieutenants. That’s why Mayor Rahm Emanuel was out of the communication loop.

Why would Foxx have inappropriate ex parte communications and muck up her recusal?

Why would her office waive the customary demand for reduced sentencing by Smollett and offer no objection to the case file being immediately sealed?

Was Foxx making good on a promise?—accepting a bigger, better quid pro quo?—or just singing the tune she needed to sing to stay in the band?

That’s now a matter for the FBI to figure out.

What everyone has figured out about Chicago is that the rule of politics supersedes the rule of law.

Chicago—indeed—is completely corrupt.

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Michael Medved: Message to Congress: Legislate, Don’t Investigate

To the intense disappointment of hyper-partisan Democrats, the Mueller Report delivered anti-climactic results: no evidence of Russian collusion and no new charges against Trump and his team.

Despite his complaints on Twitter and elsewhere, the president allowed Mueller to complete his investigative work without significant interference, so it’s time to put to rest the charges and counter-charges.

Democrats, however, intend to use Congressional Committees to continue investigating Trump’s personal and business history, and some Republicans talk of retaliatory investigations of Obama’s FBI and Justice Department. This waste of taxpayer money is not their primary job as lawmakers: we hire legislators to legislate, not investigate.

Those who want to drive Trump from the White House have only one way to do it: vote him out.

The desperation of Democrats to continue their scandal-mongering only displays their growing fear of crushing defeat in 2020.

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David Davenport: Court Packing Madness

While the rest of us enjoy basketball’s March Madness, progressives are creating madness of their own. The latest is their proposal to pack the Supreme Court by adding new seats on the Court for the next president to fill. This is clearly a political ploy to change the present 5-4 conservative makeup to a 6-5 liberal one.

Writer Wynne McLaughlin said, “Maybe history wouldn’t have to repeat itself if we listened once in a while.” Obviously, progressives aren’t tuned into history because the last time this was proposed, by President Franklin Roosevelt in the 1930s, even his own party said no.

Packing the Court will become an endless project, with every new president and congress tempted to change the makeup, and the Court will become more polarized, not less. A far better reform would be term limits for justices.

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