Author Archives: THAdmin

Albert Mohler: 2019 A Strange Year of Dids and Didn’ts

2019 was a year marked by what did happen … and by what didn’t.

The year did begin with a massive budget showdown and a government shutdown. It didn’t end that way, and instead Republicans and Democrats joined together in a massive increase in federal spending. It was a year that saw a 16-year-old Swedish climate activist declare herself a child and demand that world leaders and the United Nations give her a platform. They did.

It was the year that one of the most historic symbols of Western civilization, Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral, did burn. But, it didn’t fall.

It was the year that something like 27 Democrats did start running for their party’s 2020 presidential nomination. Some of them will make it to the first votes in Iowa, others already didn’t.

It was the year that the House of Representatives did vote to impeach President Trump.

But when it came time to forward the articles of impeachment to the Senate for a trial, Speaker Nancy Pelosi didn’t, or at least, hasn’t.

Altogether, it was a strange year of dids and didn’ts.

In any event, it is now history.

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Owen Strachan: Tolkien’s Unique Talent


You … shall not … pass!

Where were you 18 years ago when the greatest trilogy in cinematic history debuted?

In December 2001, “The Fellowship of the Ring” hit theaters. It was an epochal event, for the Lord of the Rings trilogy made nearly 3 billion dollars worldwide.

The films became a genuine cultural phenomenon for many reasons: the story is exhilarating, the conflict between good and evil is stark, and the movies are beautifully orchestrated. This was far from a guaranteed outcome, though: Oxford don J. R. R. Tolkien labored over the trilogy for years, facing frustrations, creative droughts, and self-doubts.

But Tolkien prevailed and Peter Jackson picked up the torch. We should too. December is a great time for fathers and mothers to read the books with their children.

The films are right: goodness is real.

Home is precious.

And: Evil will not win in the end.

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Lanhee Chen: Trump Bringing More Transparency and Accountability to Government Bureaucracies


It’s not something that gets a lot of attention from the media, but the regulatory reforms undertaken by the Trump Administration have been critical to keeping the American economy strong.  President Trump has led efforts to roll back red tape by cutting over 8 regulations for every new one that’s been put in place.  This action alone will save American households an estimated $3,100 each year.

Federal bureaucracies have too often abused their power to impose unreasonable burdens on Americans.  In 2014, for example, the EPA wanted to impose $20 million in fines on a family that built an environmentally-friendly pond for their horses.  President Trump is bringing more transparency and accountability where it’s badly needed.

Now, the Trump Administration is working with states and local governments to cut regulations and costs and harmonize regulations at different levels of government.  This will lead to even more cost savings and a stronger economy for the American people.

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A Year In Review

 

Townhall Review – December 28, 2019

Hugh Hewitt looks at the year in review and the impeachment of President Trump with Andrew McCarthy, a senior fellow at National Review Institute.

…Hugh also…

Talks with Senator Tom Cotton about the unrest in Hong Kong…

Talks with Michael Oren about the threat Iran presents to the Middle East…

Talks with Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College, about the recent British elections…

Talks with Bill Bennett, about China…

Talks with Nikki Haley about the United Nations…

And talks with Georgia Congressman Doug Collins about the impeachment.

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Michael Medved: The Left Wallows in Grief, Despair and Fears of Imminent Destruction

In the midst of an impeachment battle they can’t possibly win, Democrats wallow in despair and grief, according to two articles in the New York Times. Michelle Goldberg writes about her “anxiety and anger…a demoralizing degree of fear, even depression.”

A different piece by Sarah Lyall bears the sub-headline “Trump Anxiety Colors Everything” quoting a Georgia Democrat saying: “Four years is as long as I can go but eight years – we won’t have an America left.”

Such paranoia never explains how, precisely, America will disappear. How do they expect democracy to die? Sure, the present polarization is painful, but we hardly stand at the edge of dissolution or destruction. By nearly all measures, America’s better off than at the time of Trump’s election three years ago and claims that the nation is about to collapse underestimate the robust durability of our Constitution, our economy and our institutions.

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Albert Mohler: The Full Joy of Christmas

‘Tis the season for Christmas carols, and one of the most beautiful of our carols asks the most important question of all: “What child is this, who, laid to rest, on Mary’s lap is sleeping?” Christmas demands an answer to that question.

Even with all the fanfare and frantic activity of the season, that question remains. Even though commercialism and secularism and political correctness try to push the question aside, the question still stands. In the stillness of a winter’s night, the question rings out loudly and insistently – who is this child?

You know the carol’s answer: “This, this is Christ the king, whom shepherd’s guard and angels sing.” “Joy! Joy! For Christ is born. The babe, the son of Mary!” That is the true answer to the question – the baby is Christ the King. May you know the full joy of Christmas.

Merry Christmas.

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