Author Archives: THAdmin

Jerry Bowyer: High Stakes in the 2020 Election

The stakes in the 2020 election may be higher than many Americans recognize:

A detailed look by Townhall Finance into the causes of national financial collapse—measuring hundreds of factors against scores of nations—reveals that the most reliable path to a financial collapse occurs when a nation’s leadership class turns sharply against wealth creation.

When there’s an erosion of business freedom and property rights and when government corruption, taxes and debt increase, the probability of a financial collapse goes up 3 to 5-fold.

Why should we care about how other nations have collapsed? Because large sections of today’s Democratic party are openly embracing exactly those kinds of policies.

The 2020 election is not just about the difference between a 2 percent growth rate and 4 percent growth rate.

It might be about continued growth vs. something which would make the great recession pale in comparison.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Supreme Court Signals an End to the “Lemon Test”

Among the decisions coming out of the Supreme Court this term was a big case on religious liberty. By a 7-2 margin, the court found that the memorial cross in Bladensburg, Maryland could remain. The 40-foot cross—now on public land—has honored the World War I dead for nearly a hundred years.

It’s an enormous win.

A very key take-away is what the court did with the “Lemon Test”—the test of the constitutionality of government involvement when it comes to religion.

The problem with the Lemon Test—resulting from a 1971 case—is that it has always been subjective and often used in ways that are hostile to religious expression.

In his concurring opinion, Justice Neil Gorsuch declared simply, “Lemon was a misadventure”—and a majority of the justices made clear that “the Lemon Test” is no more.

That’s good news.

And by a convincing 7-2 majority, the Supreme Court of the United States said that the Bladensburg cross, and thus other similar crosses and religious expressions, can stand.

That, too, is very good news.

Read More »

Whistleblower Exposes Google’s Bias Against Conservatives

Townhall Review – June 29, 2019

Hugh Hewitt turns to Eliana Johnson of Politico to talk about Iran and the President’s last-minute decision not to take military action.

Dennis Prager and James O’Keefe of Project Veritas talk about a Google whistleblower who revealed a Google document that labels Prager and other conservatives as “Nazis.”

Seth Leibsohn talks with writer Kevin Williamson concerning his National Review article about former Vice-President Joe Biden titled “Joe and the Segs.”

Larry Elder explains why he doesn’t believe presidential hopeful and former Vice-President Joe Biden has a chance the nomination.

Hugh Hewitt asks Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, if California Governor Gavin Newsom’s health care proposal for illegal immigrants is a step towards an eventual presidential candidacy.

Mike Gallagher talks about U. S. House Democrats and their attempt to push a “Reparations Bill” through Congress.

Dennis Prager explains why marriage is good for individuals.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: Chief Justice Warren Burger: 50 Years Later

We’ve just past the 50th anniversary of the appointment by Richard Nixon of Warren Burger as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court—June 23, 2019. Among the reflections and assessments was a comprehensive look by Professor Jeffrey Morris—available at NixonFoundation.org.

Chief Justice Burger did not turn out to be a predictable friend or foe of the man who put him on the bench. He’s actually remembered most fondly by Court historians not for any particular opinion, but for his Herculean efforts to modernize a creaky administrative structure of the federal courts and to repair relations between state and federal judiciaries.

Burger did not achieve the fame of Earl Warren, or the centrality to the Court’s decision making of the current Chief Justice John Roberts.

More vacancies could arrive soon on the Supreme Court. Each matters as much as the rest, for while a Chief Justice usually names an era, he (or in the future, she) does not define it.

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: A Critical Win at the High Court

The Supreme Court has decided that a cross memorializing the fallen of WWI can remain.

As important as the ruling is, the count might be even more so. The court voting 7-2—with Sotomayor and the aging Ruth Bader Ginsburg voting against allowing the stone monument in Maryland to remain.

Let’s be clear: Writing for the majority, Justice Alito argued that tearing down this cross would not be an act of religious neutrality, it would be an act of anti-religious destruction.

No sensible person thinks for a moment that allowing that cross to stand is an endorsement of Christianity. It was a beautiful tribute honoring the service and sacrifice of the fallen.

Justice Ginsburg has become a left-wing folk hero of sorts. She wanted to tear down a cross which the mothers of the fallen erected a century ago.

Thank goodness her voice was in the minority opinion.

Read More »