Author Archives: THAdmin

Hugh Hewitt and NYT Columnist David Brooks on “The Second Mountain”

Hugh Hewitt invites David Brooks, Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, and author of The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Lifeto share insights from his book. Brooks shares how in our disconnected culture the only way to build authentic relationships is to be vulnerable. In the book, Brooks does just that. He offers a very honest and candid look into his life, his faith, and his family. Setting aside the tribalistic nature of politics, Brooks shares that our life is about our relationships, our character, how well we love, the things we love, and how well we treat our neighbor.

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Hugh Hewitt: A Favor for Republicans

Democrats have done Republicans a huge favor.

After the release of the Mueller report, the Democrats had two options: Either inflate the narrative of obstruction of justice, or attack the messenger who transmitted that report—a report that deeply disappointed them. That messenger was Attorney General William Barr.

They chose the latter course—and blundered terribly in doing so.

The whole premise of their criticism—that Barr somehow mishandled the release of the Mueller report was just absurd. Hysteria is a bad look. Democrats wore it better than their media boosters, but they still wore it poorly.

In attacking Barr, Democrats have hurt themselves. Not only did they appear desperate after their “bet everything on Mueller” wager went bust, but they proceeded to cement the alliance between President Trump and establishment Republicans, who were squarely behind Barr, in a way that had not occurred before.

From Barr to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the electorate sees a face of resolve from an increasingly united GOP.

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David Davenport: California Chips Away at Individual Freedom

California has decided sodas are the new tobacco, with five bills introduced in the legislature to limit sales. If they pass, you won’t be able to buy sodas larger than 16 ounces, you won’t find them in check-out lines, and there will be extra fees.

New York introduced a bill banning large sodas and it was blocked by a judge. While it was in effect the data showed people actually bought more sodas. And there are very different interpretations of the effects of a soda tax.

But the real issue is individual freedom. Isn’t drinking a soda your decision, not the government’s? If they are dangerous to health, isn’t education the answer, not regulation?

The nanny state keeps regulating us more and more at the cost of individual freedom. What’s next: banning meat and dairy products in school lunches? Oops, that bill has been introduced in California also.

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The Numbers on the Economy Make the Case for Trump in 2020

The 2020 election is not even going to be close.

The recent numbers on the economy make it clear:

The first-quarter gross domestic product growth came in at 3.2 percent. The economy over which President Trump is presiding is strong and getting stronger. A recession before Election Day looks less and less likely by the day.

Small wonder then that Trump dominates the GOP with an approval rating close to 90 percent. His administration’s deregulatory push is accelerating. More and more rule-of-law judges are being confirmed to the bench. Readiness levels in the U.S. military have been renewed. Our relationship with our strongest ally, Israel, is at its closest in decades.

Last week’s message from a booming economy should have rocked the Democratic field. But the party remains intent on poring over the Mueller report while they face a Hobson’s choice between a Biden-esque person or someone from the hard-left Bernie brand of Democratic Socialism.

Whoever the Dems nominate, the case for Trump in 2020 looks good.

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Albert Mohler: The Kansas High Court and the Meaning of Words

The culture of death has gained new ground as the state Supreme Court in Kansas has now blocked a law that would have protected unborn human life.

In a decisive 6-1 decision, the majority said that, according to the Kansas state constitution, a woman there has a right to an abortion, to the procedure known as D&E—dilation and evacuation. Note: that is the dismemberment and the removal of the unborn child from the woman’s body.

The decision was breathtaking, catching both sides of the abortion argument in Kansas by surprise.

The constitution of Kansas was adopted in 1859. Abortion was not mentioned. Abortion wasn’t intended.

Once again: We’re looking at invented law and invented rights made by courts.

If we are not restrained by the meaning of words—in this case the words of the state constitution—then we are fundamentally unrestrained. And that means our government is unrestrained, and there are few more deadly dangers than a government unrestrained.

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