Albert Mohler: The Moral Confusion of Our Culture

Billy Graham

The moral confusion of our culture was appallingly illustrated in a recent article in the New York Times: “Is your child lying to you? That’s good.”


The author, Alex Stone, refers to research suggesting that the children who learn how to lie the earliest are the children who turn out to be smarter. It takes a certain amount of intelligence, after all, to learn how to lie.


Your child isn’t lying? Well, don’t worry. The article supplies exercises you can do with your child to speed up the process of learning how to lie.


Stone goes on to suggest that one of the worst things parents can do is to punish a lie. Instead, he encourages parents to pay children to tell the truth.


We really are living in a world turned upside down when parents in a major American newspaper are told to celebrate when their toddlers lie and are offered tactical advice about how to teach them to lie.


It’s a catastrophe. It’s a moral world turned upside down. And that’s no lie.

Read More »

The Budget Battle and the Fight to Strengthen our Armed Forces

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — January 13, 2018

Hugh Hewitt invites Michael Oren to analyze the recent uprising in Iran in the wider context of US foreign policy to Iran. Host Mike Gallagher and Congressman Mike Gallagher delve into the subject of present US military preparedness and the fight to strengthen our Armed Forces. Mike Gallagher then asks Rona McDaniel a variety of questions on the current hot issues in Washington, DC. Hugh Hewitt brings James Hohman from the Washington Post to dissect the merits of Michael Wolff’s controversial new book on President Trump. Michael Medved looks at the White House DACA meeting between Republicans and Democrats, chaired by President Trump. Dennis Prager poses insightful historical questions to Victor Sebestyen, author of a new book on Lenin. Finally, Dennis Prager analyzes the potentially explosive tension between California and the rest of America, as the Golden State pursues extremely liberal policies that indirectly punish other states.

Read More »

Michael Medved: A New Monument to Black Confederates


Two Republican legislators in South Carolina proposed a new monument on the state Capitol grounds to honor Confederate soldiers—this time commemorating black fighting men who went to battle for the South.

This idea is both ill-considered and offensive. First, the estimated 6,000 African-Americans who did fight for the Confederacy were mostly slaves, and forced to do so—many deserted when the Confiscation Acts and Emancipation Proclamation offered freedom to those who crossed Union lines. Second, black soldiers represented less than 1 percent of the 750,000 white Confederates—and a tiny fraction of the 200,000 blacks who served the Union military.

Finally, it makes no sense to construct new memorials to those who fought against the United States in an effort to destroy our country. Yes, there may be romance and sentiment associated with the South’s “Lost Cause” but conservatives who want support from people of color must unequivocally acknowledge that this Lost Cause deserved to lose.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: The Ongoing Carnival of Venom

U.S. Senate

Addiction was the story of 2017. No: Not addiction to opioids, though of course tens of thousands of families are still mourning the death of a loved one to the scourge coursing through the United States.


No: Not addiction to the toxic combination of power and lust fueling the sexual misconduct scandals that burst onto the public stage in the name Harvey Weinstein.


And no, not an addiction to President Trump, either on the part of his adoring legions or his “worst enemies.”


No, the centerpiece addiction of the past year—which is widespread and still growing—is to outrage itself, to the state of being perpetually offended, to the need not only to be angry at someone or something, but also to always and everywhere be, well, hating.


We are all trapped in this ongoing carnival of venom, a national gathering of unpleasant souls.


This year, let’s throw the trend into reverse. The best way to start is a long look in the mirror.

Read More »

A Cancer Growing on Congress


There is a cancer growing on Congress.  It is the curse of party-line voting.  The biggest legislation of the Trump administration is the tax bill, passed with only Republican votes.  And the biggest of the Obama administration:  Obamacare, again passed on a party-line vote with only Democrats.

Party-line voting has grown dramatically in the last 40 years.  In the 1970s, party unity voting was around 60 percent but today it is 90 percent.  Sadly it has become the new normal.

Such partisanship is cancerous because it cuts out all the people and ideas of one political party. And it leads to rushed votes, without the expected give and take and amendments of a quality legislative process. It also leads to weak laws because what can be passed by one party’s vote can be undone later by the other party’s vote.

This is no way to run a government.  I vote for more collaboration and less hyper-partisanship in 2018.

Read More »

Time to Invoke the “Reid Rule” Again

U.S. Senate

How did the United States end up without an ambassador to the most important non-nuclear nation in the world—Germany? Richard Grenell was nominated to be the U.S. ambassador in Berlin in September, but the New Year opens without a U.S. ambassador in Berlin, as there wasn’t enough time for a floor “debate” of 30 hours on Grenell in November or December. Who is to blame? Senate Democrats, of course. So much of the current confirmation crisis—scores of nominees are in Grenell’s boat, but his delay is one of the most risible and destructive—and its many consequences go back to the rule change implemented when Harry Reid was running the Senate: the infamous “Reid Rule.”

The Democrats are running out the clock on every nominee, demanding 30 hours of “debate” on each one of them, in hopes that, come 2019, they will return to the majority and block them the old fashioned way – in committee.

The New Year should begin with Mitch McConnell laying down the law on the basic duties of the Senate with another deployment of the Reid Rule and get these nominees their vote.

Read More »

Michael Medved: 2017: A Breakthrough Year for Hollywood Heroines?


Hollywood’s so desperate to get past harassment scandals that industry insiders have proclaimed 2017 “the year of the strong woman.” Box office returns show that the three top moneymakers in America all featured female protagonists: “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” “Beauty and the Beast” and “Wonder Woman.” “Women truly emerged as the giants of cinema this year,” said box office analyst Paul Dergarabedian.


Of course, it’s also noteworthy that this trio of top films, as skillful and enjoyable as they were, all counted as sequels or remakes of properties dating back more than 40 years—hardly triumphs of daring originality!


Somehow, these rehashed projects got new life by casting glamorous new actresses: Daisy Ridley of “Star Wars” is 25, Emma Watson of Beauty and the Beast is 27, and Wonder Woman Gal Gadot is 32. It’s hardly a shock to see moviegoers happily investing their money to gaze up at youthful screen goddesses with striking good looks.

Read More »