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David Davenport: The Coming War In Data Privacy Is From Europe Not Washington


While Mark Zuckerberg has been busy defending Facebook over data collection and privacy, a much more ominous threat is quietly coming from Europe. The European Union is implementing tough new standards on data privacy with stiff fines for violators. What many don’t realize is that these rules do not apply only to European companies, but to anyone who has data from Europeans.

For example, American universities enroll students from abroad and they will now be subject to this law.  Complying will cost millions and those who violate the new law could be subject to fines up to $23 million dollars.

Europe’s view is that the individual controls his or her data, not companies that collect it.  With an amazing overreach around the world, this now becomes a new global standard.  On top of trade wars, brace yourself for a new—and costly—cold war over privacy and data.

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Hugh Hewitt: It’s Time for the GOP to Push Some Nominees


The United States Senate returns to work this week and it’s time to talk about President Trump’s nominations again—especially those to the federal courts.

With the recent death of “Liberal Lion” Judge Stephen Reinhardt, the U.S. Court of Appeals for 9th Circuit has eight vacancies, but only two nominees. There are more than 150 vacancies across the federal courts as the White House nomination process, the Senate Judiciary Committee and Senate Democrats as a group have all worked at a snail’s pace.

Where are the nominees? It would take a week to fill out the list and send the names forward—if there was resolve and a sense of urgency.

It’s time for Senate Republicans to work as hard as ordinary Americans, especially when deadlines draw close. It’s time to act as though governing really is as important as senators campaigning for election say it is.

Let’s see some nominees.

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Gassing of Civilians Puts Syria in the Crosshairs

Townhall Review – April 14, 2018

Senator Joni Ernst, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, joins Hugh Hewitt to discuss the United States response to the deadly chemical attack by the Syrian regime leader Bashar al-Assad on the rebel-held town of Douma, Syria. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced hard questions from Congress on censoring conservative content, like that of Diamond and Silk. Hugh Hewitt and Larry Kudlow, Director of the National Economic Council, take on the issue of tariffs and how it appears China has softened their rhetoric. John Fund, national affairs columnist for National Review, and Hugh Hewitt discuss the issue of alleged voter fraud in California. Dennis Prager looks at the emotional damage women may face from the “Hookup Culture.” Michael Medved looks at the reality of gun confiscation in one American city, Deerfield, Illinois. Freedom of speech on college and university campuses is under attack and Dr. Everett Piper, President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University, an outspoken proponent of freedom of speech on campus filled in Mike Gallagher to take on that subject.

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Michael Medved: “Chappaquiddick”: A Powerful Reminder of Arrogance and Corruption


The new film “Chappaquiddick” depicts a searing scandal that changed the course of political history. As the only surviving brother in a storied dynasty, 37-year-old Senator Ted Kennedy looked like a sure bet for the Presidency in the Summer of 1969. But after leaving a boozy party with a 28-year-old female passenger, he drove his car off a bridge.

Inexplicably, he waited more than 9 hours before notifying local authorities who might have rescued the trapped young woman. The film highlights backstage manipulations, involving some of the nation’s most powerful figures, that rushed the victim’s burial without autopsy and treated Ted’s political survival as their all-important goal.

For those disgusted by today’s tawdry politics, “Chappaquiddick” provides a powerful reminder that corruption and arrogance have long afflicted American public life.

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Jerry Bowyer: Trouble for Silicon Valley


The investor who bet on PayPal, bet on Facebook, and bet on Trump is now betting against Silicon Valley. I’m talking about Peter Thiel and his announcement that he’s leaving the Valley for Los Angeles. For years, Thiel has been ahead of the curve when it comes to investing and culture. And now he’s signaling possible trouble for Silicon Valley.

Thiel’s leaving because, in his words, Silicon Valley has gone from just liberal to a one-party state. They were always left-wing. Now they’re so radical that it’s hurt their ability to produce successful companies.

A city built on the principles of innovation and openness has sheltered itself from dissent. If they’re not open to new ideas, they can’t innovate, and if they can’t innovate, smart investors and entrepreneurs will find the places that can.

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Albert Mohler: Bashar al-Assad’s Abhorrent Efforts to Break the Will of His Own People


On Saturday night, dozens of citizens in Syria choked to death after what’s been reported as a suspected chemical attack by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Assad’s way of breaking the will of this community that still opposes his rule was to use a chemical weapon, which killed not only men and women but also children.

These are the most abhorrent, murderous, and indiscriminate weapons ever invented by human beings.

What we’re seeing here breaks every civilizational rule. It breaks the Geneva Convention. It breaks every principle of the United Nations. It breaks every law of the international system. But you’ll notice that none of those arenas, none of those agencies was able to stop this murderous dictator in Syria from killing his own people.

The headline out of Syria reminds us that there is really no way to overestimate the human capacity for moral evil.

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