Commentary

David Davenport: Conservatives: Beware the Wrong Message

Conservatives’ message was individual liberty and limited government, but it’s been narrowed to a defense of capitalism and free markets. This message is a dead-end for younger voters, especially.

Young people view both government and markets with suspicion but they think government is fairer. Having lived through 2008, facing student debt, wage stagnation, lower-paying jobs — they dislike the harshness of markets.

A 2017 Pew poll found that 57 percent of younger Americans want a “bigger government with more services,” which is what liberals offer.

There is a larger point to conservatism than just free markets and capitalism. Young people love their individualism and resent being told they have to wear helmets and pads through life. They can still be reached with a message of individual liberty and limited government, which is where conservatives need to begin.

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Hugh Hewitt: An Executive Order That Further Drains the Swamp

Critics of President Trump often express bafflement over why his broad support among conservatives is so enduring.

The answer is short and simple: Trump is establishing a record of genuine and possibly lasting conservative reforms.

The latest came on October 9, when he signed two executive orders designed to improve transparency when government agencies issue or enforce “guidance” on how best to comply with a law or regulation.

Don’t be fooled by that word “guidance.” These informal missives from the vast federal bureaucracy carry extraordinary real-world costs and sometimes extremely destructive punishments.

Now: Trump is bringing down the hammer on the guidance-addicted bureaucrats.

“This regulatory overreach gravely undermines our constitutional system of government,” Trump said.

Now that is conservatism.

And it’s conservatism that attracts conservatives.

How blindingly obvious.

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Owen Strachan: A Big Loss for LeBron

LeBron James recently made headlines for his comments about China. James argued that when Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey supported Hong Kong democratic protestors, he was “misinformed.” Morey’s support caused “harm,” James said.

For those paying attention, there’s a revealing hypocrisy here. It’s common today among the left to speak against “immoral capitalism” and to decry unjust politics practiced by supposed American tyrants. Whatever one thinks about America, China is run by an actual tyrannical regime. Free speech doesn’t exist. Dissidents are placed in “re-education” camps.

There’s a reason NBA stars are speaking out for China here. They make tons of money from sneaker sales in China. There are many wonderful elements of the free market—but supporting tyranny to make millions is not one of them.

After the public outcry, LeBron says he’s staying quiet. But the damage is done.

Count this a big loss for LeBron … and the NBA.

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Albert Mohler: An Earthquake at CNN’s Equality Town Hall

CNN’s recent Equality Town Hall was an earthquake—morally, politically, and culturally.

In case you missed it: When Beto O’Rourke was asked if he would strip the tax exemption from religious organizations that hold what he considers to be the wrong view of marriage, he responded with an unequivocal and unconditional “yes.”

Shortly after that, Beto O’Rourke then tweeted his own statement, making clear he was proud of it.

Some on the left were extremely troubled, not because they disagreed with him, but because he let the cat out of the bag.

Michael McGough, senior editorial writer for The Los Angeles Times, ran a piece with the headline, “Beto O’Rourke’s ‘church tax’ idea plays into conservative paranoia about same-sex marriage.”

Conservative paranoia?

Conservative evangelicals are now called “paranoid” for listening to the words actually spoken by those who are running for president, and being concerned about those words.

That’s not paranoia.

That’s called reality.

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Michael Medved: Not All Screen Time Is Created Equal

An important new study from the American Medical Association makes the point that children hurt their school performance not by the total hours they spend on “screen time” but by the kind of screens they choose to watch.

In the journal Jama Pediatrics, the authors summarize 58 studies published in recent years. Their conclusions show that time spent watching TV or playing video games is just as destructive as experts have long maintained—particularly damaging children’s achievement during their teenage years.

But other sorts of screen time—like social media on smart phones, or surfing the web—prove far less destructive because they’re less passive, more communicative.

In an era when parents sometimes spend thousands on tutors to boost a child’s academic prospects, they could produce better results by strictly limiting time gawking at the tube, or lost in the fantasy world of video games.

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Jerry Bowyer: Beto Makes the Case for State Suppression of Religion

On CNN last week there was a deeply disturbing exchange between Democratic candidate Beto O’Rourke and Don Lemon, who asked:

“Do you think religious institutions—like colleges, churches, charities—should they lose their tax-exempt status if they oppose same-sex marriage?”

“Yes. There can be no reward, no benefit, no tax break, for anyone, any institution, any organization in America that denies the full human rights and the full civil rights of every single one of us.”

Just to be clear, this not about whether donors should be allowed to deduct contributions or not. This is an open call for the state to tax the church, to seize the assets of the church—and synagogue and mosque—and not of churches in general, but targeted at the ones who retain the orthodox positions of their respective faiths.

It’s an argument for the state suppression of religion.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Democrats’ Mistake on Impeachment

On my radio show in recent days I have been asking beltway reporters if they think House Democrats run the risk of turning their impeachment “inquiry” into a kangaroo court by repeatedly breaking with the precedents of impeachments past?

They all agreed. Yes: There is a risk, though each evaluated the size of that risk differently.

Simply put: Democrats are moving forward without a full floor vote and without the legal standards that have marked impeachments throughout our nation’s history.

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone points out—and I quote—“precedent for the rights to cross-examine witnesses, call witnesses, and present evidence dates back nearly 150 years. Yet the Committees have decided to deny the President these elementary rights and protections that form the basis of the American justice system …”

This is not just about the president.

Speaker Pelosi and her party are rejecting the deeply embedded ideals of due process for the accused.

It’s a terrible mistake.

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