ADF

Commentary

Losing Her Million Dollar Bet


Senator Elizabeth Warren wants to affirm her Native American identity and to collect a million dollars in the process: President Trump in a rally promised to pay that much if DNA tests could prove that she’s an Indian.

She cites tests indicating her genetic Indian ancestry is as much as 1 in 64, or as little as 1 in 1,024. No: no recognized tribe in America would accept a single great-great-great-great grandfather as proof.

Worst of all, Warren’s insistence on the “one drop of blood” standard is inherently racist; what does DNA mean without history of cultural affinity or communal participation?

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: The Kavanaugh Effect on the Upcoming Midterms


The long national nightmare surrounding the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court is over.

Democrats in the Senate, the media and protesters were unable to stop Kavanaugh—despite throwing everything but the kitchen sink at him.

The media narrative—initially—was that this catastrophe would energize Democrats in the mid-terms.

The problem with that narrative is that the data shows that the Republicans are even more energized than their Democratic counterparts.

Before Kavanaugh was confirmed, the political betting market PredictIt gave Republicans a 68 percent chance of keeping the Senate. Now they’re at 85 percent. In the House, GOP numbers went from 34 percent, up slightly to 36 percent.

The GOP may well gain seats in the Senate and could even possibly hold onto the House.

Read More »

Lanhee Chen: It’s Not Easy Being Mitch McConnell


It’s not easy being Mitch McConnell. As Senate Majority leader, he has one of the toughest—and most underappreciated—jobs in Washington.
But does he ever do that job well. Senator Mitch McConnell is the boldest and most skillful Senate Republican leader that I have seen in my lifetime. His leadership has helped to confirm two Supreme Court justices, dozens of appeals courts judges, and many more appointees to key positions in the Executive Branch and across government. And he’s a big part of the reason why many Americans have enjoyed tax cuts this year.
Over the next month, Leader McConnell faces another huge challenge—ensuring Republicans hang on to the majority in the Senate after the November elections. Here’s to hoping he handles that task with the same skill that’s led him to so many victories before.

Read More »

Incivility and Election 2018


Over the course of these last weeks in the run up to Election Day we’ve seen a spike in what can really only be called mob-like behavior and outright pleas for incivility—from people like Hillary Clinton: “You can’t be civil with a party that wants to destroy what you stand for.”

Or even our former Attorney General—Eric Holder: “When they go low, we kick ’em.”

And of course the backdrop for all of this is protest.

The behavior is—in Hillary’s own words—uncivil. It’s also alarming.

President Trump may make us uncomfortable at times, but look at what GOP majorities have accomplished: Tax breaks, easing burden of regulation, trade deals, Supreme Court appointments, record low unemployment … and I could go on.

Don’t let the noise of protesting mobs discourage you from voting this cycle.

Read More »

Michael Medved: The President Can Act Immediately to Launch a ‘War on Waste’


In the last weeks before November’s crucial election, President Trump should make bold moves to address a looming crisis that most politicians prefer to ignore: soaring budget deficits and a crushing national debt.

A new group, OpenTheBooks.com, calls for a “War on Waste” to curb the outrageous spending, like squandering a million dollars to prepare religions for the discovery of extraterrestrial life, and another million for ex ed for prostitutes in California.

The best way to curb outrageous waste of taxpayer dollars is transparency. Open The Books suggests that President Trump immediately begin posting on-line every cent the White House spends, and order that every other federal department do the same. Then he can command that each federal department cut at least 5%.

These executive actions would provide major steps toward a leaner, more efficient, less costly federal government.

 

Read More »

Michael Medved: No, the Gold Rush Wasn’t Racist


At Cal State Long Beach, a handsome statue known as “Prospector Pete” will be moved and sports teams will drop the “The ‘49ers” mascot” because Gold Rush references now count as racist.

One Native American activist said that “walking by a statue that’s put in a prominent place… that’s another type of trauma that’s being imposed on me.” But if the Gold Rush that began 170 years ago was a calamity then California itself is a calamity. The state exists because of the fastest migration in human history with nearly 300,000 newcomers arriving to seek instant wealth. They included Chinese, Hawaiians, Latin Americans, Australians and even  Native people from outside California.

The gold they drew from the earth built the federal treasury and helped make America an economic superpower for the first time.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: The Unconventional President


As President Trump’s first two years in office come to a close, we’ve seen two originalist justices confirmed to the Supreme Court, 26 originalist appeals court judges confirmed and 41 new district court judges on the bench-and dozens more pending.

Add to that: a massive military rebuild underway; a massive tax cut and a renegotiated trade deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

That’s just a fraction of his accomplishments, but it’s enough to have silenced the #NeverTrumpers and conservative critics.

Yes: Trump is as wearying today as Andrew Jackson must have been in 1829 to the people of both parties who are used to a different set of rules. I’m one of them—and my criticisms of the president are many and detailed. But my fear of the wild-eyed left is far greater than my discomfort with his bull-in-china shop politics.

The very unconventional Trump is succeeding. A lot of winning.

Read More »