Commentary

Bowyer: Corona Virus and the Resumption of Economic Activity


A debate is raging among conservatives over our response to the coronavirus. On one hand you hear the point that the cure is going to be worse than the disease. On the other, we hear no price is too high to protect life.

One side is talking about thriving; the other, about surviving.

Of course, the sanctity of life is first, but this is a false choice. We can protect life without shutting down our entire economy.

How?

By making some commonsense distinctions based on risk and reward.

Think of a mosh pit at a night club … high risk, low reward. Our GDP gain almost nothing from it, but the virus gains a lot.

On the other hand, think about road or bridge construction. Lots of economic punch, low contagion risk.

President Trump should look in this direction. He should extend the principle of high and low risk reward zones to the broader economy as well.

I’m Jerry Bowyer.

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Hewitt: The New “Master of the Senate”


Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has emerged as the keystone of our nation’s capitol.

Amid a pandemic threat that has caused the nation’s worst crisis since 9/11 coupled with fiscal/economic challenges that are already the equal of the Great Recession, McConnell has been nothing short of “magnificent.”

That description came from former House speaker Newt Gingrich, who went on in his interview with me last week to call McConnell, “one of the most important Senate leaders in American history.”

Gingrich is right.

The complexity of our time, the depth of partisan rancor and the intensity of media glare will help secure McConnell’s legacy as among the most talented legislators in our nation’s history.

They called LBJ the “Master of the Senate.” In times of crisis. it’s comforting to have a leader every bit LBJ’s equal at work for the country, the Constitution and the Republican Party.

We are witnessing Leader McConnell at his finest hour.

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David Davenport: Democracy Depends on Civic Virtue

Some say authoritarian governments are better able to manage a crisis like coronavirus than a democracy. But I say, not so fast.

The Founders wisely provided for emergency powers when needed, and both the president and governors have used these. We have institutions such as the Federal Reserve able to take quick action when needed.

But beyond that, our democracy depends on the virtue of the people. Benjamin Franklin stated what the founders understood when he said, “Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom.”

The jury is still out on whether people get this. We still have far too many people, especially young people, out and about, ignoring social distancing. People are still hoarding sanitizer, masks, and toilet paper.

Yes, we need everything medical science can bring to the table but, more than that, we need the American people to step up their sense of civic virtue.

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Michael Medved: Israel’s “National Unity” Compromise

The coronavirus forced a resolution of Israel’s polarizing, paralyzing political stalemate. Benny Gantz, the former army chief-of-staff who fought Prime Minister Netanyahu to a virtual tie in three national elections in the course of a year, finally accepted his rival’s invitation to join “an emergency national unity government” to fight the pandemic.

To do so, Gantz had to split with the left-leaning elements of his Blue-and-White Party. Now this isn’t a betrayal—it’s a demonstration of putting patriotism above party. Netanyahu also agreed to concessions—after 18 more months in the top job, Israel’s longest-serving Prime Minister will also step down and enable his new partner to become Prime Minister for the next eighteen months. The clearest winner in all this is the nation of Israel, which sends a message to her American friends about the importance of coalition and compromise, especially in times of peril.

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Lanhee Chen: Approaching COVID-19 With Grace and Patience

The coronavirus crisis has already exacted a significant toll on our country, with lost lives and lost livelihoods. Our economy is basically shut down, with millions joining the ranks of the unemployed each week.

I know that all Americans, like me, are eager to get back to life as usual. But this coronavirus crisis is one that will not end on our own timing. And we will need both grace and patience to carry us through.

We will not be able to restart our economy until the worst of the public health crisis has passed. It will be hard to convince people to eat out, shop at the mall, attend a sporting event or take that trip to Europe until they believe it is safe to do so.

So that means—as hard as it is—we wait at home for this crisis to end. With the confidence that this, too, shall pass.

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Owen Strachan: Signs of Hope in Treating Coronavirus

Chances are good right now that you feel like you’re drowning in bad news.

Here’s some seeming good news: in the midst of Coronavirus spread, it appears that some doctors are seeing a positive response to a new drug combination called, in abbreviated form, the “Hydroxy cocktail.”

In New York, one doctor has apparently treated almost 700 patients with good success. In response to this, the FDA per the encouragement of President Trump has given a green light for testing.

At Townhall.com, Kevin McCullough commented on these developments: “Use of the [cocktail] in the USA is already demonstrating life-saving results…due to the generosity (not greed) of “big pharma.””

We await fuller results from the “Hydroxy cocktail” effort. Here is something we know for sure: irrespective of partisan politics, we need good news.

Let’s not fall prey to mud throwing and cheering against our public officials.

If these reports are verified, let’s celebrate a win.

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Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and Our New Heroes

What does it mean to be a hero?

The dictionary defines a hero in terms of courage, achievement and morality. In practice, our culture’s heroes have commonly been sports figures, such as Olympians or military figures.

But heroism is really about doing the right thing and standing for the right virtues even when the world isn’t watching. Many of the most heroic acts undertaken in human history are unknown to me or to you or to history—but they are not unknown to God.

In this crucial moment, we need a new category of heroes. Today, our heroes include doctors, nurses, and medical staff on the frontlines of the global pandemic. They are putting their lives at risk in order to protect and extend the lives of others.

But the notion of a hero has expanded to those who are stocking the grocery store shelves and delivering our packages—people who are making the world work and trying to keep all the pieces of society together.

We’re seeing heroism where we never knew to find it before.

As a society, we don’t pass out gold medals to grocery store stockers or to X-ray technicians. But when you think about it, we probably should.

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