Commentary

Michael Medved: Lessons from the College Cheating Scandal

The cheating scandal in college admissions should force immediate changes at leading universities. For instance, corrupt parents bribed coaches and created false records for their kids, who pretended to be athletic stars in water polo, rowing or sailing.

But why reserve slots even for children who really excel in these sports? How does the presence of better student golfers, for instance, raise the quality of a major college? Football and basketball can make big money for the university, but minor sports cost money that only inflates tuition.

Moreover, kids who are accomplished in sailing, golf, or tennis, most likely come from wealthy backgrounds. Giving them preferences in admissions is like affirmative action for rich kids.

In addition to grades and test scores, it’s appropriate to count volunteerism, or artistic ability, or community leadership. But to tilt toward participants in minor sports shows a problem of misplaced priorities.

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Lanhee Chen: What We’re Learning From the Slate of Democratic Presidential Candidates

The 2020 Democratic presidential field continues to take shape, and what’s been more revealing are the people who have decided not to run, as opposed to those who have.

Mike Bloomberg, the former Mayor of New York City, would have been a formidable candidate with his wealth and moderate positions on economic issues.  He’s not running.

Sherrod Brown, a US Senator from c, would have brought a liberal pragmatic voice to the primary campaign.  He’s not running either.

Those who are left are either extreme liberals like Beto, Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders, or previously moderate Democrats like former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper who now struggled to even admit that he’s a capitalist.

With Medicare-for-all and the Green New Deal dominating the policy discussion amongst the contenders, we shouldn’t be surprised that centrist Americans have been squeezed out of the Democratic Party.

And that’s a trend that works in President Trump’s favor as he seeks re-election in 2020.

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Albert Mohler: Methodists Say “No” to the Sexual Revolution

The United Methodist Church has defied mainline Protestant history by saying “no” to the sexual revolution in a crucial vote.

The news came as a result of action at the St. Louis meeting, there was a special general conference of the United Methodist Church—the last mainline Protestant denomination that had not fully surrendered to the LGBTQ revolution.

By a narrow vote of delegates, the denomination voted to uphold biblical standards of sexual morality, the historic teachings of the United Methodist Church consistent with 2,000 years of church history defining marriage exclusively as the union of a man and a woman.

The narrow vote does not once-for-all answer the future direction of the denomination. But it does point to the strains within just one church that are untenable and unbearable. They cannot last.

But the big news is this: A major, mainline denomination has said “no” to the sexual revolution.

Let’s see how the liberal power structures in that denomination and in others respond.

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David Davenport: What a National Emergency Actually Means

Few Americans realize that they currently live under some 30 states of national emergency, the oldest declared by President Jimmy Carter during the Iran hostage crisis 40 years ago. Actual emergencies come and go but emergency declarations live on.

The primary effect of a national emergency is to shift power from Congress to the president, as President Trump wanted to build his wall. Along with executive orders and domestic policy wars on poverty, crime, drugs and terror, presidents since Lyndon Johnson have been moving power from one end of Pennsylvania Avenue to the other.

But politically, it’s a two-edged sword. When presidents seek to do things unilaterally, these actions are easily canceled and replaced by the next president. Perhaps you recall how quickly President Trump undid President Obama’s executive orders.

One day Congress will wake up and notice its primary powers are lost.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Lessons of History and the Green New Deal

By now you have all heard about the Green New Deal. It doesn’t take a very long memory to know that this sort of massive spending plan will collapse the economy.

You see, the European debt crisis was triggered in part by plans very much like those recommended in the Green New Deal: Heavy subsidies for so-called green tech, utopian timelines for alternative energy usage, and punitive treatment on the kinds of energy which our economy actually depends on. The result? Greece and Spain and Italy triggered a crisis that jeopardized the future of the entire European Union.

If eight years ago is ancient history for AOC and her zealots, how about three months? France instituted a tiny version of the same thing—and even France abandoned it. Experience is a great tutor, but her tuition can be very expensive for those who refuse to learn from the failures of others.

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Dan Proft: Hate Has a Home on the Left

If you have to pass a resolution saying we, in the House, won’t tolerate anti-Semitism, what does that say about what you, in the House, have really been tolerating?

Even more astounding than the panoply of vile statements that earned Rep. Ilhan Omar an endorsement from the KKK’s David Duke is the enabling of anti-Semitism by Jewish members of Congress.

The whole Omar affair is illustrative of identity politics. The pursuit of political power demands some cultural Marxists create an identity while others abandon theirs. The key is everyone plays nice on the noxious, intersectional playground.

So Rachel Dolezal is black. Caitlyn/Bruce Jenner is a woman. And Rep. Jan Schakowsky is an apologist for anti-Semitism who chalks up Omar’s intemperance to a cultural difference suggesting that Omar didn’t say what she said and didn’t mean what she meant.

It turns out hate does have a home on the Left.

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Jerry Bowyer: What to Do for a Slowing Economy

The Trump tax cuts have done great things for our economy, but—as I’ve warned—the economy is slowing down somewhat. The new GDP report shows the growth rate last quarter dropped from an above average 3.4 to a below average 2.6 percent. Overall, 2018 was a good year for the economy, but at the end it lost some steam, but we can get it back.

First, get out of the trade war. It’s made trade deficits higher and hitting farmers particularly hard. We’ve already created the conditions for American economic preeminence with the tax cuts, let them do their thing and let’s not seize defeat out of the jaws of victory.

Second, stabilize the dollar. America became the envy of the world when the dollar was stable in terms of gold and the currencies of other trading partners.

With just a few changes, we can unleash the American economy.

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