Commentary

Elder Calls Out the Liberal Media and Obama on Police Shootings

Larry Elder explains how the liberal media and President Obama have mischaracterized the issue of blacks being killed by white police officers. Visit Larry Elder’s site at LarryElder.com

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Medved: Elie Wiesel’s Less Celebrated Role

When Nobel Peace Prize-winner Elie Wiesel died at age 87, the whole world honored him for his noble work in building Holocaust awareness through his novels and personal testimony, and for his political activism in fighting genocide in around the world, and for his efforts to support a secure, humane state of Israel.

Less well known is his crucial and profound role as a religious teacher: his books—like “Souls on Fire” and “Messengers of God”—and many others, make elements of authentic Jewish tradition accessible and compelling to the widest possible contemporary audience.

Though his best-selling 1958 novel “Night” describes his death camp experiences and questions the existence of a God who could allow such monstrous cruelty, his later work honors the Almighty as the master of new life as well as of death.

Wiesel affirmed that the best way to assure final conquest of the Nazi horror is to celebrate and renew the timeless faith that Hitler tried to kill.

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Mohler: Self-Designated Policy Experts

The Supreme Court’s recent decision about Texas’ abortion law has prompted the editors of the Wall Street Journal to make an important connection between the Supreme Court and the current political polarization in the United States.

They write that, “At least one half of the country’s polarized electorate now thinks that liberal legal jurisprudence simply means judges will do whatever they must to get a desired result. About that, Justice Thomas is explicit: ‘The Court should abandon the pretense that anything other than policy preferences underlies its balancing of constitutional rights and interests in any given case.’”

The justices, he said, are actually operating as self-designated policy experts deciding which policy is right for the country.

The Wall Street Journal concludes, “So please, hold the crocodile tears over our ‘polarized politics.’ The bitter division is the result, in no small part, of a Supreme Court that picks the winners.”

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Mohler: The Court: Picking Winners and Losers

The Supreme Court recently put itself in the business of picking winners and losers, and it picked some big losers in its recent announcement on a case it would not hear. The loser: Christian pharmacists in Washington State.

The court announced that it would not take a case filed by pharmacists in that state who claimed that their religious liberty had been infringed upon because they were required to stock and to dispense the so-called emergency contraceptive, a drug or pharmaceutical that actually brings about the early abortion of a human being.

Justice Alito responded in outrage, saying, “This case is an ominous sign, at issue are Washington state regulations that are likely to make a pharmacist unemployable if he or she objects on religious grounds to dispensing certain prescription medications.” The justice then wrote, “If this is a sign of how religious liberty claims will be treated in the years ahead, those who value religious freedom have cause for great concern.”

This is indeed an ominous and important prediction from a sitting justice on the United States Supreme Court.

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Medved: A Representative Republic Beats Pure Democracy

The UK’s Brexit vote should remind Americans of the advantages of a representative republic over a pure democracy. The close vote to leave the European Union has already damaged the life savings and pension plans of millions who didn’t vote for it.

In a representative system, legislators take into account not only the will of majorities, but passion of minorities who care most and most often know most about an issue. For instance, though polling shows overall majorities favor fire-arm restrictions, the gun-owning minority can exert enough influence to protect the Second Amendment. Majorities might favor confiscatory tax rates on the super-wealthy, but economists and corporate planners convince legislators that such policies would stunt growth and cost jobs.

By-passing representative institutions and putting crucial questions to a direct vote of the people where even slim majorities prevail can produce dubious—and potentially dangerous—outcomes.

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Obama Sets Regulatory Record

A recent report concluded that the federal government added 43 major new regulations last year, increasing regulatory costs by more than $22 billion.  This brings the Obama regulatory record to a stunning 299 major new regulations at a cost greater than $100 billion per year. And expect another surge in President Obama’s final year in office.

If you wonder why the economy is not growing, this is one primary culprit. If it takes several years and thousands of dollars to get permits to start new projects or hire new people, growth is killed. The tax code, environmental regulations, labor protections—these are mostly there to protect things as they are, or used to be. What we need is a dramatic cleaning out of the clogged up tax code and regulatory system in Washington, not adding more.

Our economy is growing at almost precisely half the rate it grew from 1950-2000. We need regulatory reform, not more regulatory growth.

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Hewitt: May Freedom Long Endure

Pepperdine California Democratic Party

This year’s Fourth of July comes amidst tumultuous times for our nation and for the world. The terrorist attack in Istanbul was—of course—only the most recent atrocity: Before Istanbul, there was Orlando, and Brussels, and San Bernardino and Paris, and the list could go on and on. And there are more threats to our freedom than radical Islam alone…

We have internal threats to our freedom—things that whittle away at our rights—like the Supreme Court that that (increasingly) takes core decisions out of the hands of the American people and their elected representatives.

It all this points to the fact that freedom is no longer the norm.

It is the exception to the rule. Freedom—as Reagan said—“is never more than one generation from extinction.”

As you take time with friends and family this 4th, savor the still beautiful fact that we are indeed free … and then join me as we redouble our individual commitments to fight to do all we can in order that freedom—unfettered freedom—and that it may long endure.

From all of your friends at the Salem Media Group, Happy Independence Day!

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