Commentary

Lanhee Chen: After Mueller: A Look at the 2020 Election

President Trump faces a much clearer pathway to reelection in 2020 now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s found no evidence that the President or the Trump campaign colluded with Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election.

President Trump’s task ahead is to focus his reelection effort on the reasons why voters should give him a second term in office.  And while Democrats continue to obsess over Trump and his alleged misdeeds, it’s up to the President and his team to focus instead on the ways in which they’ve improved the livelihoods of the American people with tangible policy accomplishments.

The President spearheaded tax cuts that have helped many Americans keep more of their hard-earned money; his Administration has cut regulatory burdens and red tape to spur economic growth; and he has appointed judges to federal courts who respect the rule of law and the Constitution.

If President Trump can keep his rhetoric—and his focus—on touting these accomplishments, he’ll go a long way toward winning four more years in the Oval Office.

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Hugh Hewitt: Elite Media and the Mueller Report

So: Robert Mueller has delivered his long-anticipated report to Attorney General William Barr.

Here’s the short of it: There was no collusion and there was no obstruction of justice. And there’s no fair way to interpret this other than as a big win for President Trump.

The investigation was bigger and broader than virtually all observers knew: 19 lawyers; 40 FBI agents; 2,800 subpoenas; 500 search warrants; 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence and interviews with some 500 witnesses.

For the last two years, it was a legitimate story-the prospect of collusion and charges of obstructing justice.

Those are serious stories. I didn’t believe it then. But now, it is not even a legitimate story.

It’s a perilous time for elite media: So many outlets and so many individuals have been repeating this for so long. They are now going to have to come to grips with a very new reality.

It’s going to be difficult for many of them.

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Jerry Bowyer: Bribery Scandal, Why Even Bother?

One of the perplexing things about the recent bribery-for-college-admission scandal into prestigious schools is a question few are asking: “Why even bother?”

Elite education in recent decades has seen double-digit price increases and at the same time moved from its mission of broadening minds towards narrowing them. So: Higher price and lower quality. Seems like a bad deal, and that’s not even counting the bribery premium and the risk of detection.

All this won’t end until we end it. Conservatives and people of faith are keeping this nonsense going—every time we insist on sending our kids to the “best” schools.

They aren’t the best schools any longer—they’re just the most prestigious.

After scandals like this, it’s not clear that they’re even that any longer.

The best schools are the schools which reinforce the Judeo-Christian worldview and western civilization. They also have an added bonus: You don’t even have to bribe your way in.

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Albert Mohler: Kentucky Leads the Way in Defending Life

The state of Kentucky is in the historic process of passing four new, pro-life laws—all of them expected to be signed by Kentucky’s pro-life, Governor, Republican Matt Bevin.

One has already been appealed—it’s a law that would nearly ban abortion after about six weeks of pregnancy. The “Fetal Heartbeat Bill” would protect life once a detectable heartbeat is existent.

House Bill 148 would ban abortion completely in the state of Kentucky, taking effect only in the event that Roe v. Wade is reversed.

Another would require physicians to tell women about certain realities of life and options available to them in the event they’re considering an abortion.

But in moral terms, one of the most important of these bills is the last one, called House Bill 5. It would make illegal abortion based on race, gender, or the disability of a fetus. But the pro-abortion movement is fighting it with everything they have.

It’s a big moment for the cause of life.

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David Davenport: Let Him Bake Cake

You may remember the baker Jack Phillips in Colorado. As a Christian, Philips felt he could not in good conscience decorate cakes celebrating events that did not square with his beliefs.  The Colorado Civil Rights Commission opposed him and, finally, the US Supreme Court said the Commission had acted prejudicially.

But within weeks of the Court’s decision, the Civil Rights Commission brought another case against Phillips for declining to customize a cake celebrating a gender transition.  One Commissioner took to Twitter calling him a “hater.”

Finally, after six and a half years, the Commission has decided to withdraw its complaint and let him bake cakes in peace.  Perhaps the change from Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy to Brett Kavanaugh was a reality check.

First Amendment religious rights and Fourteenth Amendment civil rights are sometimes in tension, but religious rights must not be put down by government agencies.

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Michael Medved: Lessons from the College Cheating Scandal

The cheating scandal in college admissions should force immediate changes at leading universities. For instance, corrupt parents bribed coaches and created false records for their kids, who pretended to be athletic stars in water polo, rowing or sailing.

But why reserve slots even for children who really excel in these sports? How does the presence of better student golfers, for instance, raise the quality of a major college? Football and basketball can make big money for the university, but minor sports cost money that only inflates tuition.

Moreover, kids who are accomplished in sailing, golf, or tennis, most likely come from wealthy backgrounds. Giving them preferences in admissions is like affirmative action for rich kids.

In addition to grades and test scores, it’s appropriate to count volunteerism, or artistic ability, or community leadership. But to tilt toward participants in minor sports shows a problem of misplaced priorities.

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Lanhee Chen: What We’re Learning From the Slate of Democratic Presidential Candidates

The 2020 Democratic presidential field continues to take shape, and what’s been more revealing are the people who have decided not to run, as opposed to those who have.

Mike Bloomberg, the former Mayor of New York City, would have been a formidable candidate with his wealth and moderate positions on economic issues.  He’s not running.

Sherrod Brown, a US Senator from c, would have brought a liberal pragmatic voice to the primary campaign.  He’s not running either.

Those who are left are either extreme liberals like Beto, Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders, or previously moderate Democrats like former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper who now struggled to even admit that he’s a capitalist.

With Medicare-for-all and the Green New Deal dominating the policy discussion amongst the contenders, we shouldn’t be surprised that centrist Americans have been squeezed out of the Democratic Party.

And that’s a trend that works in President Trump’s favor as he seeks re-election in 2020.

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