Commentary

Medved: Iran Debacle Exposed an Important Truth

There is very little to celebrate in the failure of Congress to block the president’s disastrous Iran deal, but at least the outcome should put to rest the pernicious charge that “Zionists” or Jews control American politics.

Though major Jewish organizations worked passionately to defeat this deal, they failed completely—even with Jewish members of Congress. Of the 29 self-identified Jews in the House and Senate, 19 of them—or nearly two-thirds—voted with Obama, not with the State of Israel. Republicans stood unanimously against the deal, so all of these pro-administration votes were from Democrats, whose deepest commitment isn’t to Jewish faith or love of Israel, but to liberalism, their true religion.

Media coverage never mentioned that all Jewish representatives in Congress—28 Democrats and 1 Republican—amount to just 5.4 percent of the House and Senate, giving the lie to the toxic old claim (by Pat Buchanan) that Capitol Hill is “Israeli Occupied Territory.”

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224908375″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »

Mohler: A Lurch to the Left

In Great Britain, Jeremy Corbyn has now been elected as leader of the Labour Party. Simon Nixon of the Wall Street Journal rightfully describes his election as “one of those rare political events that can accurately be described as an earthquake.”

Britain’s Labour Party was, until recently, the mainstream liberal party in Great Britain. But Jeremy Corbyn may change that. He advocates an aggressive form of socialism.
In a very sobering article written for the Wall Street Journal, Bret Stephens suggests that Corbyn’s election is a grave threat not only to the United Kingdom but to Western civilization itself. What we are witnessing is a massive lurch to the left.
And there are parallels here in the United States.

Most observers think that Bernie Sanders has very little chance of securing the Democratic presidential nomination. But take note of the fact that Jeremy Corbyn could now be Prime Minister of Great Britain in only a few years’ time. That, as Bret Stephens says, is a direct threat to the very continuation of a stable democracy.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224472712″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »

Medved: Democratic Field: No Youth, No Diversity

The most recent GOP debate, highlighted freshness and variety of the Republican candidates compared with the monochromatic field for the Democrats. The leading Democrats are all white Anglos, 68 years or older, and they’ve all worked as professional politicians since their 20s. Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders or Joe Biden have each been part of the Washington establishment for more than 20 years.

The GOP, by contrast, features three front runners—Trump, Carson and Fiorina—who have never held public office; Ben Carson and Rand Paul are both accomplished physicians who refocused their careers to heal our ailing system.

There’s also ethnic and age diversity totally missing among Democrats: Carson is black; Cruz and Rubio are Latino; Scott Walker, Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, Chris Christie and Rand Paul are all under 55. If the public wants youth, diversity and reform, they should compare the Republican candidates to the tired D.C. insiders the Democrats have put forward.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224333627″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »

Thornbury: Republican Hopefuls Should Be Listening

Greg Thornbury

As we look towards the 2016 Presidential election, a recent Quinnipiac poll released yielded some surprising results:

If Vice President Biden was the Democratic candidate, he would beat Donald Trump by eight points, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush by six points and Senator Marco Rubio by three points.

In head-to-head matchups, the current vice president does much better than Hillary.

For months, all of the analysis has been on Clinton. She is, after all, the presumptive nominee of pundits. But what matters is the opinion of the American people.

And why’s Biden popular? This poll suggests something that has nothing to do with politics. “He’s likable,” or so they say.

Conservatives do a great job of discussing their ideas and convictions. But as crucial as those virtues are, there’s an X-factor that we sometimes miss. People subconsciously ask:

“Do I want to see this person on my television for the next four years?”

Or, stated differently, “Do I like this person?”

The Republican hopefuls should be listening.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224157945″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »

Hewitt: Why the Wednesday Night Debate Matters So Much

Pepperdine California Democratic Party

This is a football-mad country … and thank the stars it is.

There are bridges across the partisan divide, and they are often painted in team colors.

The arrival of tailgating and of fall temps will also drop the temps of the campaign rhetoric, which, truth be told, hit boiling far earlier than any campaign I’ve ever reported on or participated in.

That’s good news actually, as too much politics can cause a country to overdose. Better some interval training in August and September followed by the marathon that begins in earnest after the Christmas revels.

Which is why the Wednesday night debate may matter so much. It may well be the last time that many voters genuinely check in for the next three months, the months of collective fun in our country’s annual rhythm.

Wednesday night’s impressions will linger. The candidates need to use their moments on camera to create a story that will endure through the distractions of fall. I am happy to have a seat at the table setting up some of those impressions.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/223992711″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »

Medved: The Folly of Staging Unwinnable Fights

The recent controversy surrounding Kim Davis in Kentucky should not be understood as a milestone in the struggle for religious liberty, but it does illustrate a dangerous, destructive tendency among too many conservatives. The problem with her fight was that she had no chance to win: there is no way, legally or politically, to stop Rowan County from issuing licenses for same-sex weddings.

The same mentality surrounded the doomed, foolish government shutdown nearly two years ago: with Obama as president, there was no chance of pressuring him to abandon Obamacare. A third example involves the recent push by some presidential candidates to end the long-established understanding of the Fourteenth Amendment regarding birthright citizenship. To do that, advocates must either amend the Constitution or dismantle the current Supreme Court—both impossible.

If conservatives keep staging unpopular fights they can’t conceivably win, the disillusioned grass roots will lose interest in fighting—and in conservatism.

It’s more important to do right than to feel self-righteous.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/223844783″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »

Brooks: The Poor: An Untapped Resource

Believe it or not, most conservatives believe that the government plays an important role in helping the needy. Indeed, they affirm along with Friedrich Hayek and President Ronald Reagan that the social safety net for the truly needy is a great achievement of modern civilization.

So why do conservatives so often complain about the safety net? Because as it is currently administered, it does not better equip citizens to build meaningful, dignified lives of their own making.

The conservative heart provides more help for to the poor than subsistence and dependence. Conservatives define success by how few people need help from government programs, not how many we can enroll for government help.

Conservatives don’t view the poor as a burden on society in need only of charity. Instead, they see the poor as an untapped resource of strength and growth. That’s why conservatives insist on work as a central solution to poverty.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/223407364″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »