Commentary

Medved: Media Distortions Fuel Spike In Murders 6-10-15

The month of May saw tragic spikes in murder rates in Baltimore, New York, Chicago and other big cities—an alarming reversal of nearly 30 years of progress in reducing violent crime. Irresponsible media coverage of police-tensions with the black community combined with demagogic posing by leftist politicians and agitators to raise the levels of urban violence.

The obsessive focus on incidents of police shooting African-American males served to spread the false idea that the cops in general are a threat to black people, rather than the truth that police offer the chief source of protection against inner city brutality These media distortions lead to less cooperation with police, and less confident and effective policing. Most victims of the new murder epidemic are black, as are the suspected perpetrators, showing African-American youth facing a risk of violence from black civilians many times greater than the risk of confrontation with anyone wearing a police uniform.

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Davenport: Supreme Court Decision Time 6-9-15

June is bustin’ out all over, the song says, and it will soon bust out at the U.S. Supreme Court. June is the month when many of the Court’s decisions in cases heard over the last 9 months will be announced. Obamacare has been in court since the day it was signed into law, which happens when a massive overhaul to a major system has very little debate or attention to detail.  Drafters recently claimed that the issue in Court now was a mistake.  But it’s not the Supreme Court’s job to fix Congressional mistakes, so the Court should decide that Obamacare subsidies are not valid in states that do not have their own exchanges, as the law states, and send it back to Congress and the states.

Same-sex marriage is being addressed just fine in the states and lower courts.  There is really no need for a major Supreme Court declaration about it, and a conservative court should say so. Either way; Supreme Court decision time is here.

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Mohler: A Social Revolution 6-8-15

The nation of Ireland recently became the very first on the planet to legalize same-sex marriage by vote. In this case by a vote of the people, by a referendum. As the Associated Press reported, “Ireland’s citizens have voted in a landslide to legalize gay marriage . . . a stunningly lopsided result that illustrates what Catholic leaders and rights activists alike have called a ‘social revolution.’” It is, indeed, a social revolution and behind it more fundamentally, a worldview revolution and a moral revolution.

According to The Economist, “84 percent of the population regard themselves as Catholic.” Moreover, 71 perce of Irish young people—those aged 18 to 24- voted for same-sex marriage. The majority of these, I should point out, were educated in Catholic schools. Clearly, the big lesson here is that the Catholic Church failed to communicate their message in favor of traditional marriage to young people and to the nation at large in a convincing way. There’s a lesson here for those of us here in the United States.

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Medved: GOP Debates Shouldn’t Be Limited To 10 6-5-15

Fox News made the unfortunate decision to limit the first Republican debate, scheduled for two months from now, to 10 participants, based on their standing in national polls. This will exclude some worthy contenders on a flimsy basis – including a candidate with 4 percent support, while a rival with 3 percent is excluded. Given that the margin of error in most polls—their admitted rate of inaccuracy—is at least 3-6 percent, this makes no sense. Also, ten candidates on stage is far too many since each prospective president will be limited to 5 minutes, maximum, to discuss all the big issues.

A much better plan would be something like this: the candidates should draw lots, dividing into three debates with five debaters each. As candidates quit the race, this can shrink to two groups, with eventually all survivors on stage together. It’s not too late to restructure debate plans for the sake of the party and the country.

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Brooks: Genuine Care For The Poor 6-4-15

This might come as a surprise to some of you, but I joined the free enterprise movement because poverty is the thing I care about the most. As we seek to alleviate poverty, I have summed up three policy principles that conservatives should seek to advance:

First: It’s time to declare peace on the safety net. You heard me right. Ronald Reagan believed in the safety net. Frederick Hayek believed in the safety net. It’s not a radical position. Indeed, the social safety net is one of the greatest achievements of free enterprise.

Second: The safety net should be limited to people who are truly indigent as opposed to being spread around in a way that metastasizes into middle class entitlements and imperils our economy.

And third: Help should always come with the dignifying power of work.

Then, with these three guiding principles, we can have a competition of policy ideas and begin to make some genuine progress.

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Hewitt: “Clearing The Haze” 6-3-15

Pepperdine California Democratic Party

The Colorado Springs Gazette has published a special report on the impact of marijuana legalization on the Centennial State—a special section, called “Clearing the Haze” piloted by their editorial page editor Wayne Laugesen. The results are not pretty:

 

  • Legal marijuana has not raised a penny for the schools as promised but has instead created an enormous addiction problem among young Coloradans.

 

  • The state has also attracted cross-country criminals and indeed even the very cartels that proponents had hoped would be set back by legalization.

 

  • And the thousands of marijuana establishments that have sprung up are poorly regulated and the dope is particularly strong.

 

In short, it’s a public policy disaster. And it all remains very illegal under federal law. All that needs to happen is for a president and an attorney general to take note of the facts on the ground and act. Look for this issue to raise its head in the Republican presidential debates. And expect Colorado to try and find a way to put a very bad genie back in its bottle.

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Mohler: A Social Revolution 6-2-15

The nation of Ireland recently became the very first on the planet to legalize same-sex marriage by vote. In this case by a vote of the people, by a referendum. As the Associated Press reported, “Ireland’s citizens have voted in a landslide to legalize gay marriage . . . a stunningly lopsided result that illustrates what Catholic leaders and rights activists alike have called a ‘social revolution.’” It is, indeed, a social revolution and behind it more fundamentally, a worldview revolution and a moral revolution.

According to The Economist, “84 percent of the population regard themselves as Catholic.” Moreover, 71 percent of Irish young people—those aged 18 to 24—voted for same-sex marriage. The majority of these, I should point out, were educated in Catholic schools. Clearly, the big lesson here is that the Catholic Church failed to communicate their message in favor of traditional marriage to young people and to the nation at large in a convincing way. There’s a lesson here for those of us here in the United States.

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