Commentary

Mohler: Genocide Then And Now

A very important story has received much less attention than it deserves: Serbian leader Radovan Karadzic was convicted of genocide for his actions during the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

Under his leadership, Serbian forces lined up in the little town of Srebrenica every man and every boy over the age of 10 and massacred them in an effort to bring an end to the Islamic population there in that city.

As the editors of the Wall Street Journal note, “Europe was incapable of acting. The killing didn’t stop until President Bill Clinton, under bipartisan pressure, committed the U.S. and NATO to an air and ground campaign that forced Serbia to negotiate the war’s end with the Dayton Agreement.”

As the Journal editors wrote, “Today the world confronts the Islamic State and its homicidal leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. That will end when the same will that stopped Karadzic’s killing is brought to bear.”

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Medved: No Plausible Path to Victory

Public-opinion polls show Hillary Clinton consistently crushing Donald Trump in trial-heats but some Trump true-believers insist he could somehow still win.

In Politico, computer modeling showed he’d first need to double the percentage of black voters won by Mitt Romney—which might be possible without Obama on the ballot. Second, he’d need to do at least as well as Romney with Hispanics, avoiding the surge of angry Latinos expected to turn out against him. And finally, he’d need to win 64 percent of all of voters who identify as white—an all-but-impossible goal.

Half of all white voters are college graduates, and more than half are women—members of two big groups in which Trump’s been profoundly unpopular in the primaries, never approaching majorities (even among Republicans), let alone 64 percent.

The odds against Trump turning this around are overwhelming.

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Medved: The Folly of Making Unnecessary Enemies

When our children were still in pre-school, we tried to teach them an important lesson: don’t pick fights with your classmates, and don’t start pointless feuds with your teachers.

Apparently, Donald Trump hasn’t learned that lesson.

After a press conference, his campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, grabbed and pushed reporter Michelle Fields. Instead of apologizing when she complained, Lewandowski called her “delusional” and publicly denied he ever touched her. A new video showed he definitely did touch her and make physical contact and police have now charged the Trump honcho with misdemeanor battery. A prompt and sincere apology would have made the whole incident disappear, but now it’s a major distraction feeding the theme of Trump’s arrogant hostility toward women.

Making unnecessary enemies rather than useful friends is a terrible characteristic—in candidates, or preschoolers.

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Hewitt: An Open And Orderly Convention

Pepperdine California Democratic Party

It’s been more than 50 years since the GOP convened a convention when the nominee wasn’t at least “almost certainly” known.

The prospect of an “open convention” terrifies some and absolutely thrills others. It will all come to order on July 18 in Cleveland. When will it end? … well, that depends.

Republicans can’t control what (if anything) will happen in the streets, but they can make the convention orderly even after this most disorderly of campaigns.

The RNC should impose a schedule of votes well before the California primary so no one can claim perfidy in the aftermath of a perceived advantage.

They should also have the Rules Committee convene early, in Washington, and make it work day in and out until the rules are settled well in advance of the convention.

Transparency has got to be the rule, or a third or more of the delegates will leave screaming, “We were robbed!”

Some will no doubt do so anyway, but minimizing damage via the maintenance of order and especially the reality of fair play ought to be the goal.

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Mohler: A Future for Christian Colleges in the NCAA?

Inside Higher Ed recently reported that over 80 lesbian, gay and transgender organizations are petitioning the NCAA to cut ties with any religious college that discriminates against transgender students by requesting a Title IX waiver.

Title IX limits or prevents federal funding to institutions that discriminate on a number of bases including gender. In 2014, the Department of Education expanded this to include transgender students.

Now LGBT organizations are moving to defund and to culturally isolate any institution that stands against the moral revolution. This kind of pressure is not at all subtle. It’s an overt attempt to try to marginalize Christian institutions.

The stage is now set for every meeting of the NCAA’s governing body to be an arena for conflict over this issue. The question is, quite honestly, whether or not they will succumb to the pressure sooner or later.

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Hewitt: Electability

Pepperdine California Democratic Party

My ritual declarations of neutrality are less and less persuasive to more and more people diving into the scrum that is the GOP presidential nomination process.

But my radio show remains open to all three of the GOP candidates still in the field, and all can continue to expect fair but pointed questions, increasingly focused on their electability. After Tuesday’s contest, the race now turns to Wisconsin.

Trump’s bulldozer approach might work, but the odds against it are rising. Every institutional force in the GOP is now calculating that a Trump nomination will cost the Senate majority and maybe the House and not a few state legislatures thrown in, whereas a Cruz-Tom Cotton, Cruz-Nikki Haley, Cruz-Rubio, or a Cruz-Carly Fiorina ticket puts new demographics of age and ethnicity into play against the dreadful candidacy of Hillary Clinton.

Back to my point on how I have been directing all of my questions to the various candidates:

Any one of these four tickets could win in the fall. Which other ones could?

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