Albert Mohler: Turning the Civil Rights Act on Its Head

Last week, the Sixth US Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 covers transgender persons even though they do not appear in the legislation.

The opinion was written by Circuit Judge Karen Nelson Moore who writes—and I quote: “the funeral home fired the employee because she refused to abide by her employer’s stereotypical conception of her sex.”

That ruling means that there is now no determinate meaning to sex or gender in the United States of America.

This is a direct threat to religious liberty because the Sixth Circuit said that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act has no bearing on this employment question whatsoever.

The moral revolution has but one great barrier to its complete victory: that barrier is religious conviction.

Watch closely.



Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: What to Hope for From a North Korea Summit

President Trump has agreed to go to a summit with the dictator of North Korea, Kim Jung Un. Those who have watched three previous administrations fail to curb the North Korean nuclear program are stunned and wondering out loud what could possibly come of such a meeting.

If Donald Trump comes back with any concessions it will be a major win for his foreign policy even as the destruction of the physical caliphate of ISIS achieved under his watch is in sharp contrast to the fecklessness of the Obama years. We are watching the renewal of a policy of peace through strength, and a key part of that is the massive budget increase passed by Congress earlier this year. After 8 years of appeasement, American power is back and deployed around the globe. It may be enough to bring calm to the Korean peninsula, or it may not work. Either way, it is preferable to the appeasement that marked the Obama years.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: The “Two Rivers” of U.S. Media

In late 1811 and early 1812, the town of New Madrid in the Missouri territory was hammered by three major earthquakes. “The ground heaved and pitched, hurling furniture, snapping trees and destroying barns and homesteads,” wrote Elizabeth Rusch in Smithsonian Magazine.

Like those earthquakes, the election of 2016 produced two “rivers” in U.S. media. One of those rivers is thoroughly inundated with anti-Trump, #NeverTrump debris and sediment. The other is almost wholly free of those ingredients.

It isn’t just cable news, the “two rivers” effect is mostly the result of the self-selected flows we direct ourselves to via Twitter feeds and chosen for us by Facebook’s and Google’s almighty algorithms.

The rise of partisanship on every issue, unmediated by respect for basic decency, is accelerating. Tapping the brakes, and eventually making a U-turn, is what the media need to do.

Read More »

Michael Medved: “Lessons Learned” on Oscar Night

The over-riding message from this year’s Academy Awards? “We’ve Learned Our Lesson!” Responding to the #MeToo movement and reports of erotic exploitation and sexism, presenters and Oscar winners frequently alluded to the scandal and made sanctimonious pledges to crack down on wrong-doers.

After complaints in recent years about scant Oscar attention to people of color, numerous black and Hispanic celebrities appeared on stage and Latinos won some of the most important Oscars—including Best Picture, Best Director, and best Foreign Language Film.

And after last year’s epic snafu with Warren Beatty announcing the wrong Best Picture winner, this year he received the right envelope.

Despite such improvements, a long predictable ceremony, with no blockbusters in serious contention, yielded some of the lowest TV ratings in Academy history.

Have the lessons really been learned?

Time will tell.


Read More »

Lanhee Chen: Obamacare in the Courts (Again)

Over twenty states filed a lawsuit last week targeted squarely at the heart of Obamacare. The battle is being led by the Attorney General of Texas, Ken Paxton. He argues that because Congress—in the tax reform bill passed into law late last year—effectively ended Obamacare’s requirement that people buy health insurance, the rest of the law cannot stand.

The lawsuit poses no immediate threat to Obamacare.  But if it makes its way to the Supreme Court—as four other cases on the law already have—the law could be in jeopardy, especially if one of the liberal justices on the Court steps aside soon and President Trump gets the opportunity to name a replacement.

This all reminds us of just how unpopular Obamacare continues to be.

If and until the courts step in, it’s still up to Congress and the Trump Administration to deal a decisive blow to Obamacare.

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: Fruits of the Protests After Shooting in Florida

In the wake of the horrific school shooting in Florida, well organized activists have embarked on a strategy of attacks against the NRA. Some have attempted to brand the NRA as a terrorist organization, and companies have been bullied into dropping businesses ties with it. It hasn’t worked. In fact, analysis by Bowyer research published recently on Townhall Finance shows that on-line inquiries about membership in the NRA reached the highest levels ever recorded.

In other words, large numbers of Americans saw these attacks and instead of running away from the NRA, started researching how they can sign up! And those companies which ended business relations with NRA have suffered sharp declines in public favorability.

Apparently Americans like the whole Bill of Rights despite political attacks on parts of it.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Poll Shows Conservatives Outnumbering Liberals


A new Gallup Poll offers encouragement and challenges for Republicans. In the national survey, Americans who describe themselves as “conservatives” still outnumber self-defined “liberals” by significant margins—35 percent to 26 percent. What’s more, in 39 of the 50 states, conservatives top the other side decisively. In only nine states—all of them on the coasts—do liberals enjoy an advantage.

With such lop-sided recent results, it’s hard to imagine that the November elections would even be close, or how Obama, Clinton and other liberals could even come close to the presidency.  The answer is that many Americans who call themselves conservative feel so disgusted by petty squabbles and dubious personalities in our politics that they don’t even bother to vote.

It also explains the Democratic scandal-mania: liberals like concentrating on trashing Trump’s personality rather than responding to conservative policies that remain broadly popular.

Read More »