Commentary

Dan Proft: Hate Has a Home on the Left

If you have to pass a resolution saying we, in the House, won’t tolerate anti-Semitism, what does that say about what you, in the House, have really been tolerating?

Even more astounding than the panoply of vile statements that earned Rep. Ilhan Omar an endorsement from the KKK’s David Duke is the enabling of anti-Semitism by Jewish members of Congress.

The whole Omar affair is illustrative of identity politics. The pursuit of political power demands some cultural Marxists create an identity while others abandon theirs. The key is everyone plays nice on the noxious, intersectional playground.

So Rachel Dolezal is black. Caitlyn/Bruce Jenner is a woman. And Rep. Jan Schakowsky is an apologist for anti-Semitism who chalks up Omar’s intemperance to a cultural difference suggesting that Omar didn’t say what she said and didn’t mean what she meant.

It turns out hate does have a home on the Left.

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Jerry Bowyer: What to Do for a Slowing Economy

The Trump tax cuts have done great things for our economy, but—as I’ve warned—the economy is slowing down somewhat. The new GDP report shows the growth rate last quarter dropped from an above average 3.4 to a below average 2.6 percent. Overall, 2018 was a good year for the economy, but at the end it lost some steam, but we can get it back.

First, get out of the trade war. It’s made trade deficits higher and hitting farmers particularly hard. We’ve already created the conditions for American economic preeminence with the tax cuts, let them do their thing and let’s not seize defeat out of the jaws of victory.

Second, stabilize the dollar. America became the envy of the world when the dollar was stable in terms of gold and the currencies of other trading partners.

With just a few changes, we can unleash the American economy.

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Michael Medved: A Message to Representative Omar

Imagine if conservatives had attacked freshman Congress member Ilhan Omar by questioning her loyalty to the United States and suggesting that she cared more about her Muslim faith or her Somali homeland than she did about America.

Democrats along with all right-thinking people would have been outraged at the bigoted nature of such an assault, but Omar herself has repeatedly slammed her pro-Israel colleagues on a similarly unacceptable basis. Her most recent comments claim that Israel supporters “push for allegiance to a foreign country.”

This is no more appropriate than prior slanders against Catholic Americans for “allegiance” to the Vatican over loyalty to America, or potential claims against Omar and Muslim colleagues for giving devotion to Islam above the Constitution.

It’s always okay to challenge the judgment of Jewish or Christian supporters of Israel, but it’s never appropriate to question their patriotism.

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Lanhee Chen: Democrats Push Single Payer

Democrats introduced single-payer health care legislation last week that—if passed—would move every American into a single, government-run insurance program, within two years. The bill already has over 100 co-sponsors in the U.S. House, and many of the Democratic Party’s candidates for president in 2020 are sure to endorse it too.

But, as with other plans to bring socialized medicine to all Americans, this single-payer legislation has plenty of drawbacks.

Like your current coverage? Say goodbye to it. Value your relationship with your doctor? Time to find a new one. Think health care spending in the U.S. is high now? Wait until you see what happens if the Democrats’ proposal actually becomes law.

One more thing: The Democrats have no explanation for how the system would be paid for.

But, don’t worry. I’m sure they’ll find the estimated $30 trillion somewhere.

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Lanhee Chen: The President Was Right to Walk Away

President Trump’s recent summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un may have ended without a deal, but the entire episode served to demonstrate that sometimes, walking away is the best decision.

Published news reports suggest that the North Koreans were asking us to lift many of the most onerous sanctions that have been placed upon them, in return for a promise that they’d destroy a site that’s been called the “heart” of their nuclear program.

But there were no guarantees that we’d be allowed to verify their claims. And certainly no guarantees that they’d keep their promises.

Given our history with the rogue regime, we have plenty of reason to distrust.
It can be tough to walk away from a negotiation, particularly when it would be politically expedient to do otherwise.

That’s why President Trump should be congratulated for doing what he did.

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Jerry Bowyer: It’s Time to Put Socialism On Trial

Larry Kudlow is Director of the National Economic Council, which makes him President Trump’s chief economic advisor. But in his recent CPAC speech, Kudlow gave some advice directly to the American people. He asked us to put socialism on trial.

What a great idea.

C.S. Lewis wrote an essay called “God in the Dock.” The “dock” is the defendant’s seat in British trials. His point was that modern man puts God on trial, whereas our forebears properly saw man as on trial. The people who put God on trial also tend to put freedom on trial.

Conservatives have offered effective defenses of economic freedom, but Kudlow is right: It’s time to put godless socialism in the dock, in the defendant’s seat. I choose as witness number one and number two, two forms of socialism – communism and fascism.

What do you have to say for yourselves, socialists?

We’ll await your defense.

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Michael Medved: Both Parties Exposed Problems at the Cohen Hearings

The televised Michael Cohen hearings of the House Oversight and Reform Committee showed that the two political parties not only differ in their attitudes toward president Trump, but offer a stark contrast in the demographics they represent.

Of the Democrats on the committee, 19 of 25—76 percent—were women or people of color or both. Democrats will never build a durable majority without doing better among white males, who still represent a full third of the electorate. Meanwhile, Republicans have the opposite problem: on the committee, they were nearly all white males—17 of 18—joining one white female from North Carolina.

The bigger GOP problem was regional imbalance: more than 70 percent of committee Republicans hailed from Southern states, and a party that is visibly dominated by just one part of the country has a problem in both public perceptions and balance.

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