Commentary

Davenport: The Democrat’s Dilemma: Persuasion or Turnout


Richard Nixon, who ran 5 times for president or vice president, said he ran to the right to win the Republican nomination, but then back toward the center in the general election. 

In 2004, George W. Bush and Karl Rove reinvented presidential campaigns. Discovering that undecided independent voters had shrunk from 20-plus percent to single digits, they concentrated on turning out their own base of voters and it worked. Later campaigns have followed this sometimes ugly, but effective strategy. 

Now the Democrats face a dilemma.  Their early energy was all from far left Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris.

But not so fast, as late entry Joe Biden is more moderate, though he is being pushed left on issues such as abortion and climate change.

Persuading the middle better suits Biden, but Democrats may demand a hard left turn.

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America: The Best Hope of Mankind


This is Hugh Hewitt for Townhall.com.

As we continue the long days of summer and of celebrations like the Fourth of July or family vacations, it is important to keep in mind that across large parts of the world the idea of either freedom or leisure much less both is so far off as to be the stuff of legend. For us, it’s a “taken for granted” annual ritual.

We are so blessed that we often simply forget to count those blessings and marvel at their largely uninterrupted enjoyment for 200-plus years. No, we are not a perfect nation, not even close, but we are the best hope of mankind, exceptional for all of our history and ever more so as the world collapses in so many places into abject barbarianism.

Our political leaders and our courts may disappoint. Our common culture may disparage our uniqueness, but the facts of history do not lie.

In the face of our many imperfections, we should all give thanks for living in this time and in this country.

I’m Hugh Hewitt.

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Michael Medved: A Political Earthquake Could Shake Los Angeles – and the Nation

Frustration, rage and disgust over the homeless crisis in Los Angeles threatens a political revolution that could bring profound nationwide consequences. A group of activists has mounted a campaign to recall Mayor Eric Garcetti for his smug, inept handling about the swelling plague of transient encampments, filthy streets and homeless crime, despite authorization for more than a billion dollars in added spending to counter the problems.

The more local government spends on homeless services, the more transients flock to the city and befoul its streets and its parks. If the activists get 300,000 signatures on their petitions, Garcetti could be voted out of office in the middle of his term—sending a message to cities everywhere that the public’s fed up with a feckless coddling as quality of life, public health, and common decency disastrously decline.

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Lanhee Chen: There Is No Such Thing as “Free Health Care”

Massachusetts Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has now lost whatever slim chance she had of becoming President. In the first debate between Democratic Party presidential candidates, Warren endorsed the idea of taking away private health insurance from every American who has it, and replacing it with a socialist-style, one-size-fits-all government-run health plan.

Warren will sell her plan for a government takeover of the U.S. health care system as giving more Americans “free health care,” but we all know there’s no such thing. Her ideas would not only be incredibly disruptive to hundreds of millions of Americans, but it could also limit access to doctors and care, slow medical innovation and raise taxes significantly for many across the country.

We shouldn’t be surprised that Elizabeth Warren is embracing socialist-style policies. It’s all part of the leftward lurch of Democrats seeking the presidency. The only question is who will choose to join her next.

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Jerry Bowyer: High Stakes in the 2020 Election

The stakes in the 2020 election may be higher than many Americans recognize:

A detailed look by Townhall Finance into the causes of national financial collapse—measuring hundreds of factors against scores of nations—reveals that the most reliable path to a financial collapse occurs when a nation’s leadership class turns sharply against wealth creation.

When there’s an erosion of business freedom and property rights and when government corruption, taxes and debt increase, the probability of a financial collapse goes up 3 to 5-fold.

Why should we care about how other nations have collapsed? Because large sections of today’s Democratic party are openly embracing exactly those kinds of policies.

The 2020 election is not just about the difference between a 2 percent growth rate and 4 percent growth rate.

It might be about continued growth vs. something which would make the great recession pale in comparison.

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Albert Mohler: Supreme Court Signals an End to the “Lemon Test”

Among the decisions coming out of the Supreme Court this term was a big case on religious liberty. By a 7-2 margin, the court found that the memorial cross in Bladensburg, Maryland could remain. The 40-foot cross—now on public land—has honored the World War I dead for nearly a hundred years.

It’s an enormous win.

A very key take-away is what the court did with the “Lemon Test”—the test of the constitutionality of government involvement when it comes to religion.

The problem with the Lemon Test—resulting from a 1971 case—is that it has always been subjective and often used in ways that are hostile to religious expression.

In his concurring opinion, Justice Neil Gorsuch declared simply, “Lemon was a misadventure”—and a majority of the justices made clear that “the Lemon Test” is no more.

That’s good news.

And by a convincing 7-2 majority, the Supreme Court of the United States said that the Bladensburg cross, and thus other similar crosses and religious expressions, can stand.

That, too, is very good news.

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Hugh Hewitt: Chief Justice Warren Burger: 50 Years Later

We’ve just past the 50th anniversary of the appointment by Richard Nixon of Warren Burger as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court—June 23, 2019. Among the reflections and assessments was a comprehensive look by Professor Jeffrey Morris—available at NixonFoundation.org.

Chief Justice Burger did not turn out to be a predictable friend or foe of the man who put him on the bench. He’s actually remembered most fondly by Court historians not for any particular opinion, but for his Herculean efforts to modernize a creaky administrative structure of the federal courts and to repair relations between state and federal judiciaries.

Burger did not achieve the fame of Earl Warren, or the centrality to the Court’s decision making of the current Chief Justice John Roberts.

More vacancies could arrive soon on the Supreme Court. Each matters as much as the rest, for while a Chief Justice usually names an era, he (or in the future, she) does not define it.

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