ADF

Commentary

Jerry Bowyer: The Latest Blunt Instrument of the Left


Amazon Corporation is looking for a site at which to build a 2nd headquarters, and they’ve narrowed the list down to 20 American cities. But a group which calls itself ‘No Gay, No Way’ is pressuring the company to knock Austin; Dallas; Nashville; Atlanta; Columbus, Ohio; Indianapolis; Miami; Raleigh, North Carolina; and Washington, D.C off the list. The problem is that the red states which are less likely to embrace special protections for sexual identity also tend to be low tax.

This is not about protecting gay Amazon employees. This is about power, about using economic intimidation to punish cities and states which have not yet submitted.

But if the management knuckles under to activists and rejects cities with better business climates, it does so at the expense of owners, employees and customers.

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Lanhee Chen: Homelessness Crisis in the Golden State

There’s a fine line between compassion and foolishness when it comes to public policy impacting the homeless.  Unfortunately, a whole host of cites cities—particularly in California—have crossed that line.

In San Francisco, liberal policies and neglectful elected officials have enabled disorder.  The homeless are camped out on sidewalks, public drug use is soaring, and some streets are littered with waste. In 2017, over 7,000 homeless people were found during a one-night count. And this year, there have already been over 8,000 requests to clean up human waste and another 3,700 to pick up needles left on the street.

We should be a compassionate society, but we also must recognize when our leaders have failed in their fundamental responsibility both to help those in need and to promote public safety.  The time for action is long past due.

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Michael Medved: Korea as Key to Victory for Trump and GOP


Over-confident Democrats take comfort in the history of mid-term elections in a new president’s first term: for nearly two centuries, the party in power almost always loses seats in Congress.

But Republicans should feel encouraged by the only exception to that rule since FDR: in 2002, George W. Bush defied history and Republicans gained strength in both the House and Senate. Low expectations for Bush in foreign policy meant that his strong response to 9/11 looked especially impressive.

If President Trump makes serious progress in upcoming Korea negotiations, he too could beat expectations and powerfully improve GOP prospects. Already, foreign leaders like South Korea’s Moon are promoting Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize and such talk could intensify as the election approaches.

Reduced tensions on the Korean Peninsula would be good for the world, good for America and great for embattled GOP candidates in House and Senate races.

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Michael Medved: Impeachment Talk Can Only Damage Dems


Recent polls suggest 70 percent of Democrats support impeachment of President Trump—a preference ignoring obvious lessons from the recent past.

Andrew Johnson was impeached in 1868 during his last months in office and he wasn’t running for re-election. Then with Richard Nixon a century later, momentum against him proved so powerful that he resigned before voters went to the polls for mid-terms.

Only Bill Clinton faced Congressional elections in the midst of an impeachment crisis—and he became the only president since the two-party system began to gain Congressional seats in the middle of his second term. Americans disliked Clinton’s amorous adventures but they hated the idea of impeachment—and still do. If Democrats campaign for Congress promising turmoil, scandal-mongering and gridlock, they will lose—and deserve to lose.

 

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Lanhee Chen: Encouraging Developments on North Korea


When it comes to North Korea, the old adage of “Trust, but verify” isn’t nearly enough. We should—absolutely—be skeptical of the rogue regime’s claims. And we should, of course, hold them accountable for whatever promises they might make.

But we should still be encouraged by Kim Jong Un’s recent statements that he wants peace and is committed to stopping his nuclear weapons tests.

A lot of hard work stands between where we are and where we want to go, but the Trump Administration deserves credit for bringing us this far. The key question is whether President Trump can produce a deal that completely ends that country’s nuclear weapons program.

In his efforts, Trump is assisted by an all-star team of aides: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, National Security Adviser John Bolton, and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.  If anyone can get this right, we should have confidence in this team.

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Owen Strachan: Let’s Treat All Women With Respect


Here are the rules today: you must be pro-woman at all times—unless, that is, the woman you’re engaging is conservative or religious.

We saw an example of this cultural double-standard at this past weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner. This dinner has a history of friendly banter. But comedian Michelle Wolf crossed the line. Even as she joked about abortion, she attacked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, making fun of her looks, and repeatedly called her a liar.

Whatever our political differences, let’s be clear: this kind of public abuse is reprehensible. It’s especially shocking because supposedly we’re in a tolerant age that prizes diversity.

In practice, it seems, some people deserve respect, fairness and kindness.

And some don’t.

This is the strangest of ages. When a woman is conservative or religious, you can say whatever you want.

I have a better idea: Let’s treat all women with respect.

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Albert Mohler: One Family’s Sacrifice for Liberty


The New York Times recently published a story entitled “Wreck of the Juneau Is Found.” It’s about the discovery of the U.S. Navy cruiser Juneau that was blasted apart by a Japanese torpedo in 1942.

Even in the context of the millions and millions of casualties of World War II on all sides, the story Juneau resonates in a special way in the American memory, a memory of indebtedness to one family. One family that lost not one, not two, not three, not four but five sons on one day on one ship!

75 years later, the Juneau’s wreckage has been discovered but the American people’s moral debt remains: a moral debt to all those who have given their lives and have given their family members to the cause of defending liberty.

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