ADF

Commentary

Michael Medved: Finding the Message in the Miraculous


On the last Sabbath of 2018, Jewish communities around the world read aloud a Biblical passage that, coincidentally, suggests a means to find guidance in 2019. In Exodus, Chapter Three, Moses tends sheep in the wilderness and spots a bush that burns brightly but isn’t consumed.

The text not only describes this wonder, but records the reaction of Moses. “I will turn aside now and look at this great sight,” he resolves. And only then, the Bible says: “God saw that he turned aside to see, and God called to him….”

In other words, the Divine voice addressed him in direct response to his sense of wonder, his open eyes and open heart. In the year ahead, may we “turn aside to see” the miraculous developments in our world and listen for the deeper messages they’re sending us.

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Michael Medved: An Outrage Should Inspire Bi-Partisan Action


In Central California, a gang-connected illegal immigrant shot and killed a local cop who, with his wife, had just celebrated a newborn son. The 32-year-old shooter already had two drunk driving arrests and bragged on social media about his street gang membership. The Sheriff’s office that arrested him complained about California’s “sanctuary policies”—not because they deliberately protect criminals, but because they block cooperation between local authorities and federal immigration officials to apprehend the bad guys.

This tragic loss ought to persuade Americans—left, right and center—to rethink an obnoxious obstacle to law enforcement. It should also inspire bi-partisan efforts to draft new laws to keep firearms out of the hands of illegals; even the strongest defenders of the Second Amendment must recognize it was never meant to protect gun rights for those who live in the country illegally.

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David Davenport: Popular Vote Power Play


Democrats are frustrated that they have lost the presidency in the Electoral College twice in the 21st century.  But instead of amending the Constitution, they are going to courts and state legislatures.

Four lawsuits claim that votes for the losing candidate in a winner-take-all electoral vote are not counted equally as required by the 14th Amendment.  Of course all the votes are counted at the state level, as the Constitution provides, so this should be a losing argument, but these days who knows?

At the same time they seek to pass the National Popular Vote Bill in state legislatures requiring electors to cast votes for the winner, not of their state vote, but of the national popular vote.

If you want to change the Constitutional requirement of electoral voting, it should be done by a proper amendment, not an end run or a legal power play.

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Albert Mohler: As We Begin the Year 2019…


Human beings cannot help but notice the cycle of the year, and we cannot help but keep count. Just about every society on earth celebrates a new year in a major way. Thus, 2019 now arrives with gusto. We can do nothing to make it happen and we can do nothing keep it from happening. Time doesn’t ask for our permission.

Of course, we have no complete knowledge of what the year 2019 will bring. You can count on the fact that the 2020 U.S. presidential election cycle will begin with dispatch this year. Everyone will be watching the economy, and a host of problems will be inherited from 2018.

But the most important events of 2019, for you, will likely never make the headlines. The events of biggest meaning happen in our homes, our churches, our families.

Happy New Year!

May 2019 bring you and yours great blessings.

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Albert Mohler: 2018: A Whirlwind of a Year


2018 now enters the history books with more of a bang than a whimper. It was the year Brett Kavanaugh joined the Supreme Court, President Trump restructured his cabinet, Democrats celebrated a “blue wave” in the House, and the partisan divide only deepened.

It was the year that titans in the digital world began to feel the heat of international scrutiny and the stock market scored a big zero. California was threatened by the deadliest wild fires in state history and disasters dotted the globe, but in Thailand, a soccer team including 12 boys and their coach were rescued from a flooded cave as the world watched and prayed.

There was a royal wedding in Britain and the world said goodbye to scientist Stephen Hawking and to both President George H. W. Bush and his wife, Barbara. An historic age of world evangelism came to an end with the death of Billy Graham.

It was a year for the ages, and now it is history.

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Dan Proft: Vernita Lee and the Culture of Life


“Lots of people would’ve told you to abort that baby. You didn’t do that. I know that was hard. I want you to know that no matter what, I know that you always did the best you knew how to do. And look how it turned out.”

Those are the touching words Oprah Winfrey used to say goodbye to her mother who passed away on Thanksgiving Day this year.

Look how it turned out indeed. Vernita Lee’s daughter is now a billionaire instantly identified the world over by the mere utterance of her first name. Oprah may not preach what her mom practiced but—thankfully—more Americans are choosing Vernita Lee’s example over her daughter’s.

In the last decade abortions in the U.S. have declined 25 percent, according to the CDC.

As we celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, we should also celebrate that the culture of life is beating back cultural Marxism

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Medved: “Fake History” Worse than “Fake News” on Immigration


A recent article in The American Spectator badly mischaracterized our history when the author claimed that after 1965’s immigration reform—and I quote—“the quality of America’s immigrant intake has declined … Immigrants are less educated than they were in the past…. That burdens the country, but it’s very Heaven for an American aristocracy, which can hire cheap labor.”[end quote]

Now, this screed not only ignores engineers and entrepreneurs who’ve led recent waves from India, China and elsewhere, but romanticizes our past. Millions arrived from Ireland, Poland, Italy and Greece but they weren’t well-educated or highly skilled; most were destitute laborers, like my Russian-Jewish, barrel-maker grandfather.

The problem for immigrants today isn’t their “low quality”; it’s the efforts by multi-culturalists on the left and restrictionists on the right to block their healthy progress toward assimilation and Americanization.

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