Commentary

Dan Proft: Kendrick Castillo: Real Man

In our era of entitled youth and young men weakened by safe-spaced college campuses and fears of their own toxicity, it’s easy to fret for America’s future.

And then we are reminded of the existence of resolute, faithful young men prepared to defend to the death the civilized against the barbaric.

Enter Kendrick Castillo.

Castillo is the young man who bum-rushed one of the shooters who opened fire on their Colorado charter school and their 1800 classmates.

Kendrick Castillo took a bullet in the chest and laid down his life to save the lives of an incalculable number of others.

“I wish he had gone and hid, but that’s not his character,” said Castillo’s father. But, he went on, “His character is about protecting people, helping people.”

I wish we could bottle and sell whatever it was Kendrick Castillo’s parents did to raise such a courageous young man.

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Michael Medved: No Two Sides on Gaza Rockets

The old-saying “there are two sides to every argument” does not apply to violent exchanges between Israel and the Gaza terrorists of Hamas and Islamic Jihad.

Without provocation or purpose, Palestinian terrorists launched 690 rockets against Israel, striking schools and hospitals while murdering four civilians.

Israel responded with intense air strikes, aimed at military targets and militant leadership. The only public explanation for Palestinian attacks involved the desire to disrupt Israeli Independence Day and the Eurovision song competition in Tel Aviv.

Nevertheless, U.S. Representative Rashida Tlaib sympathized with such random acts of destruction, asking: “When will the world stop dehumanizing our Palestinian people who just want to be free?”

For 14 years, residents of Gaza have been totally “free” of Israeli rule and all Jewish settlements and yet they somehow believe that firing rockets at innocent Israelis counts as brave and productive.

It’s not just insanity, it’s self-destructive evil.

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Owen Strachan: The Age of Heroes Is Not Over

Cometh the hour, cometh the man.

The recent tragic shooting outside of Denver provides some healthy reminders for us.

None of us knows the hour of our death. We can’t choose the moment when we will be forced to show courage. But when that time comes, we must be ready.

When two shooters opened fire in the high school, eight were injured and one was killed—a senior named Kendrick Castillo.

When the shooter entered his classroom, Kendrick sprang into action. A female classmate told NBC News of his bravery, “That’s when Kendrick lunged at him, and he shot Kendrick, giving all of us enough time to get ourselves safe, and to run across the room to escape.”

Another student, future Marine Brendan Bialy, helped take down the other shooter.

These brave young men put their lives on the line to save others. They remind us that the age of heroes is not over.

The hour came, and the men showed up.

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Albert Mohler: Facebook’s Move Gives Cause for Concern

Facebook has removed seven people identified as “extremists.”

The New York Times reported it this way:

After years of wavering about how to handle the extreme voices populating its platform, Facebook … evicted seven of its most controversial users, many of whom are conservatives, immediately inflaming the debate about the power and accountability of large technology companies.

Louis Farrakhan of the nation of Islam and Alex Jones of the Infowars website were among those evicted.

But the Times made a point of identifying them as “conservative.”

Are we looking at a more ominous threat?

The question is: Is this the beginning of excising all unwanted speech from Facebook?

We don’t have any assurances that this is not the case.

And we know well the political and cultural climate at Facebook. When you consider the fact that 2.4 billion people on the planet use Facebook, we have every reason to be concerned.

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Hugh Hewitt: A Favor for Republicans

Democrats have done Republicans a huge favor.

After the release of the Mueller report, the Democrats had two options: Either inflate the narrative of obstruction of justice, or attack the messenger who transmitted that report—a report that deeply disappointed them. That messenger was Attorney General William Barr.

They chose the latter course—and blundered terribly in doing so.

The whole premise of their criticism—that Barr somehow mishandled the release of the Mueller report was just absurd. Hysteria is a bad look. Democrats wore it better than their media boosters, but they still wore it poorly.

In attacking Barr, Democrats have hurt themselves. Not only did they appear desperate after their “bet everything on Mueller” wager went bust, but they proceeded to cement the alliance between President Trump and establishment Republicans, who were squarely behind Barr, in a way that had not occurred before.

From Barr to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the electorate sees a face of resolve from an increasingly united GOP.

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David Davenport: California Chips Away at Individual Freedom

California has decided sodas are the new tobacco, with five bills introduced in the legislature to limit sales. If they pass, you won’t be able to buy sodas larger than 16 ounces, you won’t find them in check-out lines, and there will be extra fees.

New York introduced a bill banning large sodas and it was blocked by a judge. While it was in effect the data showed people actually bought more sodas. And there are very different interpretations of the effects of a soda tax.

But the real issue is individual freedom. Isn’t drinking a soda your decision, not the government’s? If they are dangerous to health, isn’t education the answer, not regulation?

The nanny state keeps regulating us more and more at the cost of individual freedom. What’s next: banning meat and dairy products in school lunches? Oops, that bill has been introduced in California also.

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The Numbers on the Economy Make the Case for Trump in 2020

The 2020 election is not even going to be close.

The recent numbers on the economy make it clear:

The first-quarter gross domestic product growth came in at 3.2 percent. The economy over which President Trump is presiding is strong and getting stronger. A recession before Election Day looks less and less likely by the day.

Small wonder then that Trump dominates the GOP with an approval rating close to 90 percent. His administration’s deregulatory push is accelerating. More and more rule-of-law judges are being confirmed to the bench. Readiness levels in the U.S. military have been renewed. Our relationship with our strongest ally, Israel, is at its closest in decades.

Last week’s message from a booming economy should have rocked the Democratic field. But the party remains intent on poring over the Mueller report while they face a Hobson’s choice between a Biden-esque person or someone from the hard-left Bernie brand of Democratic Socialism.

Whoever the Dems nominate, the case for Trump in 2020 looks good.

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