Commentary

Michael Medved: The Key Lesson of the D-Day Prayer

On the night of June 6, 1944, President Franklin Roosevelt spoke on the radio to announce the initial success of the D-Day invasion.

“Almighty God,” he began, urging the nation to join him in prayer. “Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.”

President Trump read those words 75 years later to commemorate the occasion.

Liberal hero though he was, FDR defined part of the war’s goal as defending “our religion.” He didn’t deny the crucial Protestant-Catholic divide, or ignore the presence in the ranks thousands of Jews and other non-Christians.

But Roosevelt’s words strongly implied a shared faith in America as an instrument of divine Providence “to set free a suffering humanity.” In today’s turmoil, may Americans rediscover that sense of common purpose.

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Albert Mohler: The Memory of Tiananmen; The Face of Communism

This week marked the 30th anniversary of one of the darkest days of the 20th century: On June 4, 1989 guns were fired and the tanks rolled against students who had assembled in China in historic Tiananmen Square in Beijing.

The students had begun gathering in mid-April, sensing what they thought was a cease in the political openness within China. They called for a multi-party system, rights for students, freedom of assembly and freedom of the press.

Western media were captivated by these courageous young protestors.

But in the hours between June 3 and 4, the Chinese Communist Party announced it was going to eliminate the protest.

Western estimates of the dead students range from several hundred to the far more credible several thousands.

There is one basic historical lesson of Tiananmen Square, and that is this: A Communist party in a one-party state does not give up its control without blood.

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Owen Strachan: Remembering the Heroes

It was bloody; it was awful; it was an operation of stupendous courage and shocking sacrifice.

75 years ago in Normandy, Operation Neptune—better known as “D-Day”—commenced. The Allied troops stormed the French beaches in order to overcome Nazi tyranny. The fighting was ferocious, with 4,000 confirmed dead on the Allied side on that one day alone.

The tone of the conflict had been set long before by British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. In an age of capitulation, Churchill dared to defy Nazi tyranny. He rallied England to defend the homeland and later rejoiced when America joined the campaign in 1941.

Churchill is famous for his leadership in World War II, and justly so. But Churchill is only the best known of the heroes of this era. Countless forgotten soldiers fought, bled, and died for the cause of freedom.

On the anniversary of D-Day, we remember their heroism—and hear them call us to the same.

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Michael Medved: The Issue of “Reparations” May Doom the Dems

More than a half-dozen Democrats running for president officially endorse the misguided notion of paying “reparations” to those whose distant ancestors were enslaved more than 150 years ago.

The New York Times recently explained that of 47 million Americans who identify as “African American,” only 30 million would receive payments—based on proof that an ancestor had lived in the pre-emancipation South.

This means Barack Obama would not receive reparations, because his father was born in Kenya, and his ancestors hadn’t been enslaved. But because Michelle Obama did have slave ancestors, the President’s daughters would qualify for payoffs.

Does this make any sense? Sasha and Malia grew up in wealth and luxury—why should they get compensation when their father, raised in much harsher circumstances, would not?

Obama, by the way, opposes reparations. He’s right. It’s an un-American idea that judges people on ancestry, not achievement, and will doom the Dems if they keep backing the concept.

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David Davenport: The Deceptive Popular Vote Bill Gains Momentum

Democrats, angry about losing the presidency twice in the Electoral College since 2000, are quietly taking action. The National Popular Vote Bill passed in three more states—Colorado, Delaware and New Mexico—this Spring and recently passed state senates in two more.

I call it the Constitutional End-Run Voting Bill because it would eliminate the Electoral College without passing a proper constitutional amendment. States agree to cast their electoral votes not for the winner in their state but for the winner of the national popular vote. Think of it: Your state votes for Candidate A, but your vote goes to Candidate B. Talk about your vote not counting.

The Constitution says votes are counted in state capitals and then electors make the final choice. Beware of trick plays that undermine both the Constitution and the states.

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Albert Mohler: Justice Thomas Weighs in Abortion

The big news coming out of the Supreme Court on abortion had as much or more to do with a decision that they let stand as much as the decision that they overturned.

The Court decided not to take up the question on appeal of an Indiana law that made abortion illegal if it were sought merely for reasons of sex selection or disability.

We should pay very close attention to the brilliant concurring opinion of Justice Thomas.

He made very clear that this issue will be back.

In his words, “The Court’s decision to allow further percolation should not be interpreted as agreement with the decisions. Enshrining a constitutional right to an abortion based solely on the race, sex, or disability of an unborn child, would constitutionalize the views of the 20th-century eugenics movement.”

In other words, Justice Thomas said, “The issue will come back to the court. It must come back to the court.”

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Lanhee Chen: A Rare Glimpse of Bipartisanship

Despite all of the partisan rancor in Congress, there is remarkable bipartisan agreement on the need to deal with the challenge of smoking and tobacco use amongst young Americans.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia have introduced legislation that would raise the federal minimum age to purchase tobacco—including vaping products and e-cigarettes—to 21.

Other Senators, including Republican Mitt Romney and Democrat Dick Durbin, have introduced similar legislation. It’s particularly striking that McConnell and Kaine both come from significant tobacco-producing states.

Tobacco use and vaping have reached epidemic proportions amongst America’s youth, creating a public health crisis that demands the attention of lawmakers. The fact that leaders of both parties acknowledge the need for action is a great start.

Now, it’s up to members of Congress to vote for this important change and for President Trump to sign this important legislation into law.

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