Commentary

Lanhee Chen: 2018 Elections and the Legacy of George H.W. Bush


The 2018 midterm elections were notable not so much for the so-called “Blue Wave” that washed over the House of Representatives, but instead for the way in which the results demonstrated how politically polarized we are becoming as a country.

Liberal areas in the northeast and on the west coast supported Democrats more strongly; and states where President Trump did well in 2016, like Indiana and Missouri, voted more Republican. That’s why the next Congress will give us divided government.

At a time when we mourn the loss of former President George H.W. Bush, we also reflect on the ways in which principles like compromise, bipartisanship, and collegiality have seemingly disappeared from our modern politics.

It’s too bad, because while we have political disagreements with others, we should always remember that first and foremost—ahead of the partisan labels or political beliefs—we are Americans first.

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Hugh Hewitt: Climate Tax Lessons From France


Before he capitulated on Tuesday, French President Emmanuel Macron had declared he would never give in to the demands of the so-called Yellow Vest protestors.

By law in France, all motorists must carry such a yellow vest in case of car trouble, but the car trouble they are rioting about for the past two weekends is not about their vehicles, but about the 5 percent hike in fuel costs that Macron had decreed as a means of combating global warming. The protests had become increasingly violent in a classic countryside versus the Capital confrontation, and had Macron not raised a white flag and rolled back the new tax, another weekend of violence was expected. He did though, and the message is clear.

As the Wall Street Journal put it: “Voters don’t believe that climate change justifies policy that would raise their cost of living and hurt the economy.” Climate change, my friends, is not an excuse to gouge tax hikes out of citizens.

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Albert Mohler: A Man of Modesty

The message went out late on Friday night: George H.W. Bush, the 41st President of the United States, had died.

He came to the presidency, of course, after serving two terms as Vice President under Ronald Reagan.

Perhaps the most illuminating moment of his leadership style came on March 30, 1981, when President Reagan was shot in an attempted assassination.

The Vice President was flying to the Southwest to speak. When he was returning to D.C., it became clear: Reagan was facing mortal danger.

Officials wanted Bush to land by helicopter at the White House, but the image of that, of course, is presidential. Bush refused.

He said: “There is one President of the United States, and he is Ronald Reagan, and he is going to pull through this. I will go by car.” And thus, the Vice President arrived at by car in a motorcade, the way he would have any other day.

That was the sort of man George H. W. Bush was: A man of modesty.

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Hugh Hewitt: George H.W. Bush: 1924 – 2018


The nation mourns the death of President George Herbert Walker Bush, our 41st President. And what a President. What, in fact, a man.

An honest to God war hero, a congressman, an ambassador to China, a party chair, a CIA Director, a Vice President and a model president, model post president and father to a president.

His greatest achievement was the careful management of the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the Soviet empire. He won the war against Saddam if not the peace. He put Clarence Thomas on the Supreme Court – a cornerstone of the originalist renaissance. Bush got crucial amendments to the Clean Air Act through dealing with acid rain and ozone, and he embraced Nelson Mandela on the White House lawn in the first year of that great man’s release.

Kind, gentle, far-seeing, tough as the fighters he flew, he was the epitome of leadership.

George H.W. Bush earned a country’s love and respect and we shall miss him all, all tens of millions of points of light he inspired.

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Albert Mohler: A Clear and Welcome Change to the Contraception Mandate


You may have missed a very important announcement from the Trump administration on the so-called contraception mandate from the Affordable Care Act.

The administration is now making extremely clear that religious employers and specifically Christian organizations cannot be required to violate conscience in the contraceptive mandate. That mandate from the Obama administration was so draconian that even some Christian ministries were ordered to comply against their own convictions—paying for contraception for all—including forms of contraception that many believe will contribute to, or cause, an abortion.

The government does have so many means at its disposal whereby it could provide this kind of contraception coverage. Requiring it of religious employers was a deliberate slap in the face, a clear violation of religious liberty.

The wheels of justice grind slowly, but the “contraception mandate” is finally gone.

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Michael Medved: Overcoming False Charges of Racism


In the last Senate contest of this election cycle, Democrats tried—but failed—to destroy an incumbent Republican with unfair charges of racism.

In the runoff campaign of the Mississippi special election, Democrats focused almost exclusively on one foolish, insensitive comment by Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith, who expressed her admiration for a local leader by saying “if he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” Dems saw a menacing invocation of Mississippi’s brutal history of lynching, and an attack on the black Democratic nominee, Mike Espy, while national media claimed Senator Hyde-Smith’s campaign was collapsing. 

When ballots were counted, however, she won easily—increasing her percentage of the final tally by 12 points over her showing in the non-partisan primary.

While pundits may obsess on silly, off-hand and—yes—regrettable remarks, voters are less willing to enforce political correctness by punishing candidates for making them.

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Jerry Bowyer: Time for the Kudlow Plan


The Republican party will shortly turn over control of the House to the Democrats, but does that mean there are no more opportunities to cut taxes and spur growth?

Not at all.

Larry Kudlow—the President’s Chief Economic Advisor—has previously promoted a way a president could cut taxes without going through Congress.

It appears that the tax statutes give the president the authority to adjust the calculation of investment taxes so that we get taxed on actual gains, not increases in prices due to inflation.

Imagine you bought a share of stock for a hundred dollars and sold it several years later for 110 dollars, but there had also been ten percent inflation. You didn’t really make any money, you just broke even, but the IRS would tax you on that alleged gain. It appears that the President has the authority to change that without going through Congress.

It’s time for the Kudlow plan.

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