Commentary

Lanhee Chen: The President Was Right to Walk Away

President Trump’s recent summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un may have ended without a deal, but the entire episode served to demonstrate that sometimes, walking away is the best decision.

Published news reports suggest that the North Koreans were asking us to lift many of the most onerous sanctions that have been placed upon them, in return for a promise that they’d destroy a site that’s been called the “heart” of their nuclear program.

But there were no guarantees that we’d be allowed to verify their claims. And certainly no guarantees that they’d keep their promises.

Given our history with the rogue regime, we have plenty of reason to distrust.
It can be tough to walk away from a negotiation, particularly when it would be politically expedient to do otherwise.

That’s why President Trump should be congratulated for doing what he did.

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Jerry Bowyer: It’s Time to Put Socialism On Trial

Larry Kudlow is Director of the National Economic Council, which makes him President Trump’s chief economic advisor. But in his recent CPAC speech, Kudlow gave some advice directly to the American people. He asked us to put socialism on trial.

What a great idea.

C.S. Lewis wrote an essay called “God in the Dock.” The “dock” is the defendant’s seat in British trials. His point was that modern man puts God on trial, whereas our forebears properly saw man as on trial. The people who put God on trial also tend to put freedom on trial.

Conservatives have offered effective defenses of economic freedom, but Kudlow is right: It’s time to put godless socialism in the dock, in the defendant’s seat. I choose as witness number one and number two, two forms of socialism – communism and fascism.

What do you have to say for yourselves, socialists?

We’ll await your defense.

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Michael Medved: Both Parties Exposed Problems at the Cohen Hearings

The televised Michael Cohen hearings of the House Oversight and Reform Committee showed that the two political parties not only differ in their attitudes toward president Trump, but offer a stark contrast in the demographics they represent.

Of the Democrats on the committee, 19 of 25—76 percent—were women or people of color or both. Democrats will never build a durable majority without doing better among white males, who still represent a full third of the electorate. Meanwhile, Republicans have the opposite problem: on the committee, they were nearly all white males—17 of 18—joining one white female from North Carolina.

The bigger GOP problem was regional imbalance: more than 70 percent of committee Republicans hailed from Southern states, and a party that is visibly dominated by just one part of the country has a problem in both public perceptions and balance.

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Dan Proft: The Next Phase of the Sexual Revolution

The sexualization of children will be televised.

It’s on “Good Morning America” where an 11-year-old drag queen dances provocatively to the approval of the hosts and studio audience alike.

It’s on Hulu in the form in the series “Pen15” with behavior I can’t describe here.

Gore Vidal would be a prude by the standards of today’s culture.

In 2015, an admitted pedophile argued in Salon.com that, “Society preventing children from engaging in sex play and romance is akin to preventing them from learning to swim.”

Today, New York state legislators respond to sex trafficking by introducing legislation to legalize prostitution.

The social justice response to sex abuse by Catholic clergy is to remove the celibacy vow and prohibitions on homosexuality for priests.

The response to the latest sexual abuse charges against R. Kelly is for his attorney to assert an implicit consent defense—for preying on 14-year-old kids.

The sexual revolution is on the cusp of conquering its final frontier.

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Albert Mohler: The Pope and the Crisis of Catholic Clergy Sex Abuse

With all eyes on the Vatican, the meeting on Catholic clergy sex abuse ended with no concrete policy developments. As The New York Times reports, “For all the vivid language and the vow to combat this evil that strikes at the very heart of our mission, the Pope’s speech was short on the sort of detailed battle plan demanded by many Catholics around the world.”

So: The really surprising development in all this was the lack of any development in concrete policies. Nicholas Cafardi, a prominent canon lawyer in the United States said, “The Pope is the sole legislator, so he could make this change wherever he wants. Zero tolerance … should be universal law. And the Holy Father can do it himself.”

But attendees did not even hear the term “zero tolerance” from the Pope.

The Pope fails to understand the gravity of the charges that had been made for decades against the Roman Catholic Church.

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Albert Mohler: A Revealing Week in the U.S. Senate

On Tuesday this week, the U.S. Senate failed to pass legislation that would protect the lives of children born alive, that would have prevented and made illegal infanticide after a botched abortion. It should be inconceivable that such an event would happen in the United States Senate, but it did happen.

It was both tragic and telling.

A bare majority—53 senators—voted in favor of the legislation, but 44 opposed it. Given the filibuster rules in the Senate, 60 votes were needed for the measure to proceed to the Senate floor for a full vote.

From time to time legislation—by virtue of the fact that it passes or fails to pass—offers something of a diagnostic test of the moral condition of the United States, of its people and its culture. Something like a moral MRI or CAT scan. What the scan revealed this week is chilling: What you see is the culture of death staring back at us ominously.

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David Davenport: Young People Lurching Left

With four cities permitting 16-year old voting and several states considering it, what we have not known is how they might vote. Thanks to a study by the Pew Foundation, now we do and it’s troubling.

In short, younger people agree with their older millennial brothers and sisters, only more so, and they disagree with their boomer parents and silent generation grandparents. 70 percent of 13-21 year olds think government should be doing more, compared with an average 44% of boomers.

Only 30 percent support Trump, compared to an average 48 percent of older groups. They are the most pessimistic about the future of the country. We already know they are much more accepting of socialism.

This feels like more than the old pattern where young people start out more liberal but grow conservative over time. It sounds an alarm for more civic education and making a better case for capitalism.

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