Commentary

Lanhee Chen: Taiwan Votes: A Lesson on Freedom

The people of Taiwan have just re-elected incumbent President Tsai Ing-Wen to another four years in office. It was a resolute expression of democracy just under one hundred miles from mainland China, in a place where freedom has flourished in the shadow of authoritarianism.

The recent protests in Hong Kong were a catalyst for the incumbent president, who rode warnings about China’s increasing desire to impose regional hegemony to a resounding victory.

Taiwan is a trusted ally of the United States. Our peoples share a love of freedom, a belief in the rule of law, and an understanding that free markets and free people are fundamental to a flourishing society.

Taiwan’s election reaffirmed the desire of its people to draw closer to the west, and to the United States, in particular. And our leaders should do what they can to ensure that the US-Taiwan relationship remains strong and vibrant for years to come.

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Owen Strachan: “1917” and the Value of Honor

What gives meaning to our days?

The new film 1917 stages this question in the wilderness of World War I, an apocalyptic firescape. Two soldiers embark on an impossible quest, debating the value of medals for bravery as they go. A soldier who won a medal for valor but has turned cynical denies the significance of his award: “It’s just a bit of tin,” he says.

As the journey unfolds, he shows tremendous courage under fire. When he completes his mission, he hands over several small items from a friend. All that is left to remember his comrade is a bit of tin.

Sam Mendes’s film is deceptively profound. It shows the value of honor, of fighting when everyone else wants to hide, even if the call of death comes in amidst the call of duty.

There is something worse than dying or suffering.

It’s living without honor; living without courage.

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Albert Mohler: Roger Scruton: 1944-2020

Roger Scruton—the British conservative who was one of the most important conservative intellects of our day—has died after a battle with cancer, at the age of 75.

Scruton helped to shape the conservative movement, not only in the United States, but even more importantly, in Great Britain.

He became a conservative when he was a student in France. Much like that classic conservative Edmund Burke who was looking the French during the French Revolution, Scruton saw an entire civilization being torn apart.

He didn’t mean to become a conservative.

But he eventually became an intellectual at large, writing 50-plus books, lecturing and teaching in many different universities on both sides of the Atlantic.

He was attacked bitterly, but he was also recognized, having been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2016.

Sir Roger Scruton will be gratefully remembered.

Scruton taught us—in the title of one of his most important books—“How to Be a Conservative.”

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Medved: An Opportunity for the GOP


A new Gallup Poll shows the Democrats’ diversity—not only in racial terms but in ideological outlook. The GOP remains overwhelmingly conservative—with 73 percent describing themselves that way and only 4 percent identifying as liberals.

Meanwhile, a full 14 percent of Democrats called themselves “conservatives” and another 36 percent said they’re “moderates.” While Democratic leaders drift to the left of their base, the GOP should target conservatives and moderates in Democratic ranks.

If you get a new voter to show up to vote Republican, that’s good—but it gives you just one extra ballot. If you convert a Democrat to your cause, you not only a bag new a vote for your side, but simultaneously take a ballot from the other side.

That’s the right formula for decisive Republican victory.

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Albert Mohler: Evangelicals and Trump 2020

In the run-up to Christmas, you may have seen coverage of an editorial in Christianity Today by the magazine’s outgoing Editor-in-Chief Mark Galli, calling for the impeachment of President Trump.

The editorial set off a whirlwind.

Galli called the president’s actions with regard to Ukraine, “profoundly immoral.”

“None of the president’s positives,” Galli said, “can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character.”

Many looking at this have said that what is evident is a split between an evangelical elite against President Trump and populist evangelicals for the president.

I’d argue that there’s a third category—that is American evangelicals who understand fully the moral issues at stake, but who also understand the political context and have made a decision to support President Trump, not out of mere political expediency and certainly not out of naivete, but out of their own analysis of what is at stake.

That analysis, rather than CT’s editorial, is likely to have real impact.

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Albert Mohler: The Overwhelming Lack of Diversity in Today’s Elite Universities


Late last year the campus newspaper at Yale—the Yale Daily News—published an article highlighting the astounding lack of worldview diversity on America’s college campuses today.

Under the headline, “Faculty Call For Ideological Diversity” the reporters highlighted four professors who made it clear, Yale stifles political discourse. In other respects, Yale has made a push for demographic diversity—race, gender, sexual orientation and the like. But, when it comes to political diversity, there is virtually none.

The numbers for universities in the Northeast are particularly startling: The ratio of liberal professors to conservatives is 28:1, according to the story.

Perhaps the strangest element in all of this is that conservative and Christian parents continue to fight so hard to get their children into schools where the faculty is determined to undermine everything those parents believed and have even taught their children.

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Jerry Bowyer: Economic Numbers Look Solid

Despite the ever-present media hysteria, it’s become clear that on the issue that really matters, Trump finished 2019 strong. I’m speaking, of course, about the economy. 2019 started with some economic turmoil and uncertainty. The trade war with China created a stock market whiplash and business anxiety.

But the data shows things have finally turned around. Economic confidence has been rising for months. 52 percent of investors approve of Trump’s handling of the economy, compared to just 32 percent who do not approve.

It’s no wonder that stocks have been hitting record highs. After the tax reform bill, the fundamentals of the economy were strong, and market performance reflected that.

That is, until the trade war killed Trump’s would-be boom in the cradle. Now that Trump is again on solid footing, he could be well on his way to victory in 2020 … as long as he steers clear of another trade war.

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