Commentary

Hugh Hewitt: Chief Justice Warren Burger: 50 Years Later

We’ve just past the 50th anniversary of the appointment by Richard Nixon of Warren Burger as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court—June 23, 2019. Among the reflections and assessments was a comprehensive look by Professor Jeffrey Morris—available at NixonFoundation.org.

Chief Justice Burger did not turn out to be a predictable friend or foe of the man who put him on the bench. He’s actually remembered most fondly by Court historians not for any particular opinion, but for his Herculean efforts to modernize a creaky administrative structure of the federal courts and to repair relations between state and federal judiciaries.

Burger did not achieve the fame of Earl Warren, or the centrality to the Court’s decision making of the current Chief Justice John Roberts.

More vacancies could arrive soon on the Supreme Court. Each matters as much as the rest, for while a Chief Justice usually names an era, he (or in the future, she) does not define it.

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Jerry Bowyer: A Critical Win at the High Court

The Supreme Court has decided that a cross memorializing the fallen of WWI can remain.

As important as the ruling is, the count might be even more so. The court voting 7-2—with Sotomayor and the aging Ruth Bader Ginsburg voting against allowing the stone monument in Maryland to remain.

Let’s be clear: Writing for the majority, Justice Alito argued that tearing down this cross would not be an act of religious neutrality, it would be an act of anti-religious destruction.

No sensible person thinks for a moment that allowing that cross to stand is an endorsement of Christianity. It was a beautiful tribute honoring the service and sacrifice of the fallen.

Justice Ginsburg has become a left-wing folk hero of sorts. She wanted to tear down a cross which the mothers of the fallen erected a century ago.

Thank goodness her voice was in the minority opinion.

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Albert Mohler: Teen Vogue Goes Rogue

Perhaps you are familiar with the magazine Teen Vogue—the edition of the fashion magazine targeting 12 and 13-year-old girls.

Now, this doesn’t sound possible, but it is: Teen Vogue has published an article advocating prostitution—advocating “sex work”—to young teen girls.

The title of the piece speaks for itself: “Why Sex Work is Real Work.” The author argues such work can be, “affirming for many people who need human connection, friendship, and emotional support.”

This is unimaginable: When you consider the fact that these young girls are among the key targets of sex traffickers—and the numbers of sex trafficking crimes are skyrocketing—we’re watching more than a moral revolution.

This is an explosion. This is a moral bomb going off.

Sometimes today, parents don’t know something because they don’t want to know.

That’s not an option; not for parents who care about their children

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Jerry Bowyer: The Crippling Load of Student Debt

Well, we just found out that student debt is at an all-time high. It’s just a whisker below 1.6 trillion dollars. Yes, trillion, with a “t.”

But it’s all worth it, right? Our young people need education. Not. So. Fast.

A new study shows the average freshly-minted college grad makes almost $11,000 less annually than he or she expected—and it’s true over a wide range of majors.

What gave these young people such unrealistic expectations? One factor is easy to recognize: Our serial exaggeration of the benefits expected from a degree.

Making it worse: Tuition has soared—faster than almost any other expense category in our economy. Recruiters and marketers have in turn hyped the value of their institutions and their degrees.

It’s time to scrap the myth that all young people should go to college, and that every school and every major is worth the price.

The debt load is simply crippling.

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Michael Medved: Time to Proclaim: “Family First”

The collapse of the family stands at the heart of America’s most pressing, painful problems—addiction and suicide, economic inequality, educational under-performance, and even homelessness.

Recent statistics show that majorities of millennials who produce children, do so outside of marriage. A University of Michigan study indicates that an amazing 20% of young adults report no contact—none!—with their birth fathers.

In response to the crisis, the left emphasizes redistribution of wealth or more generous welfare programs.

On the right, we stress the need for religious revival to strengthen family life, despite the prevalence of divorce and out-of-wedlock birth even among the fervently faithful. We need fresh efforts to change values and culture from leaders in government, media, business, religion and education, mobilized under a two-word slogan: “Family First!”

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Michael Medved: Problems Beyond Politics

I’m sure I’m not alone in knowing several families that are prosperous, hard-working and deeply religious and yet lose children to the world of drugs, out-of-wedlock birth, welfare dependence and hopelessness.

It’s also increasingly common to see solidly middle-class couples who, after 20 or 30 years of seemingly successful marriage, suddenly break up, causing pain to themselves, their children and even their grandchildren. In spite of a booming economy and increased opportunity, so-called “deaths of despair”—through suicide, alcoholism or drug overdoses—have reached unprecedented levels.

This explains the seeming disconnect between our prevailing prosperity and the big majorities who believe America’s on the wrong track for our future.

The essential problem involves the collapse of family life, and with neither liberals nor conservatives addressing the issue in meaningful ways, our politics seems to offer only a sideshow rather than a solution.

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