Commentary

Medved: It’s a Wonderful Trump Spoof Raises a Serious Question


Saturday Night Live offered a pre-Christmas spoof called “It’s a Wonderful Trump,” in which their presidential impersonator gets a glimpse of how life would be different if he’d lost the election.

The skit proved only intermittently entertaining, but it suggests a response to those who blame Trump alone for our angry antagonisms. 

Imagine that Hillary won: would America be a model of harmony and civility? We’d still disagree bitterly on immigration, taxes, trade, race relations and foreign policy. 

In fact, President Hillary might have gotten her very own special prosecutor, just as Reagan, her husband and Trump did. With Congressional Republicans pushing hard to probe Uranium One, e-mails, and the Clinton Foundation, Robert Mueller might have been tapped to lead a very different investigation. 

Sure, President Trump could do more to bring the country together. But you can’t explain our present polarization as the work of a single individual.

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Davenport: The Grinch That Ate Christmas


This is David Davenport of the Hoover Institution for Townhall.com.

It happens every year.  People who do not understand the First Amendment of the Constitution launch legal attacks on Christmas.

This year’s Grinch award goes to an elementary school principal in Nebraska who banned Santas on worksheets, Christmas trees in classrooms, an elf on the shelf, making ornaments, reindeer and, yes, “red/green items” since those are Christmas colors.  My favorite was her ban on candy canes because they are shaped like a J for Jesus and the red is for the blood of Christ and the white for the resurrection.  Who knew?

Following expressions of outrage from parents and teachers, the school district reversed the anti-Christmas policy.  Strike another blow for Christmas and the First Amendment.

Yes, the First Amendment says government may not respect the establishment of religion, but that still leaves plenty of room for you—and your children—to enjoy a Merry Christmas, even at school.

I’m David Davenport.

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Michael Medved: It’s a Wonderful Message


Sometimes, the conventional wisdom gets it right, and that’s the case with the common designation of, “It’s a Wonderful Life” as the greatest Christmas movie ever made. This 1947 masterpiece celebrates the classic American virtues—small business, devotion to family, neighborliness and ordinary decency. Jimmy Stewart embodies the Yankee hero: unassuming, tender-hearted and utterly essential to his community and his neighbors.

On my radio show and in two of my books, I’ve recommended the “Bedford Falls Test” to understand America’s role in the world. A Christmas angel shows George Bailey a vision of how horribly his town would have fared if he hadn’t lived. Just imagine how terribly the world would have suffered without America! Remembering the precious contributions that every day people bring to our lives helped George Bailey, and it can help the rest of us, to better appreciate the “Wonderful Life” we’re blessed to live.

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Dan Proft: The Secular Elite’s Discomfort With the Faithful


Apparently, the path to putting a Democrat in the White House runs through God.

No, that’s not me saying God favors Republicans.

That is, essentially, the argument from foul-mouthed DNC Chairman Tom Perez. He’s uncomfortable with the fact that church-going people disapprove of Democrat candidates motivated in large part by their conviction on issues of life and death … convictions about abortion.

Perez recently complained about clergy who are willing to support Trump motivated in large part on the issue of life. He’s frustrated that “people buy it” from these clergy—and I quote—“because that’s their only source.”

Perez is unnerved by churchgoers who lean on their spiritual leaders, leaders who are working from the Bible rather than relying on today’s secular elites.

The short of it is Tom Perez would like you to stop attending church because it puts a real crimp in the ability of Democrats to make the state supreme.

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Albert Mohler: America in 2018 Boys Scouts v. Girls Scouts


The Washington Post recently ran a major news story that has to make us pause. The headline: “Scouts recruitment war raises questions about what it means to be a girl or a boy.”

The battle is going to the nation’s highest courts with the two litigants being the Boy Scouts of America the Girl Scouts, of all things.

It all started with an ad from the Boy Scouts stating that a church in Virginia would be chartering “one of our Girl Scouts BSA Troops.”

As Samantha Schmidt reports, the Girl Scouts then filed a lawsuit against the Boy Scouts, arguing trademark infringement.

Listen to this next sentence: “The battle between the youth programs echoes a divide that has been playing out across many arenas of American life amid the #MeToo movement, raising fresh questions about what it means to be male or female in 2018.”

This article simply reflects the times better than just about anything I have read of late, sadly so.

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Michael Medved: Caravans and Shutdowns: Both Unpopular


This is Michael Medved of MichaelMedved.com for Townhall.

Congressional Democrats made a mistake to attack President Trump for his determined opposition to caravans of unauthorized immigrants at our Southern border. Automatic asylum would only encourage new thousands to make a dangerous, illegal trek.

But President Trump also makes a mistake by touting a pointless government shutdown, which might seem bold and decisive but raises the inevitable question, “what next?” The Democrats, with their newly elected House majority, won’t simply surrender and a shutdown hurts the government, the public’s faith in democracy, even our economy.

The only possible outcome is some form of compromise: no, the president won’t get all the money he wants for a wall, but he will get increased funding for enhanced border security. Since it’s obvious that both caravans and shutdowns are deeply unpopular, Congress and the president should drop the games and work out common sense reforms that can help all sides.

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Michael Medved: Turning Critics Into Admirers


The outpouring of admiration for the late President George Herbert Walker Bush largely ignores his troubled history with the press: Like all Republican presidents of the last 50 years, Bush endured carping, contemptuous treatment.

One highly critical reporter, Ann Devroy of the Washington Post, was surprised to receive a handwritten letter after her cancer diagnosis in 1996. The then-former president candidly acknowledged a “tension that clouded things between us… I was the out of touch President, the wimp; you were the beltway insider…. but strangely, wonderfully, I feel close to you now. I want you to win this battle. I want that same toughness that angered me and frustrated me to a fare-thee-well at times to see you through your fight.” Sadly, Devroy lost her fight the next year, but Bush’s graceful gesture highlighted his ability to turn critics into admirers. Every American should cherish and develop that precious capacity.

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