Commentary

Hugh Hewitt: Trump Won Big

President Trump scored a big win last week after his weeks-long confrontation with Mexico over our neighbor’s lax enforcement of its southern border, and it’s left his critics sputtering.

They’re scrambling to find some way of containing what is a clear Trump triumph—and their flailing about denies the obvious: Trump played high-stakes poker and won a big round with Mexico on border security.

Media elites, well, many just deny it.

The voters, though— and I don’t mean the “Twitter Democrats,” but voters of all ages and ideologies—are a pretty smart bunch. They know, generally, that tariffs are a lousy idea in terms of economic growth. They know too that tariffs can be a blunt instrument of national power in confrontations unrelated to economic growth.

Trump’s record may be mixed, but not last week. Last week, he won big.

He should resume in full his push for immigration reform and border security talks with Democrats right now.

It might actually work.

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Dan Proft: The Night Kodi Lee Changed the World

 

Kodi Lee is 22-year-old blind, autistic man who blew the doors of the joint on the popular “America’s Got Talent” show and left the nation in a puddle of joyful tears with his soulful rendition of Donny Hathaway’s “A Song For You.” The views on YouTube are at 25 million and climbing.

Kodi is as astonishing as is the divide in America over whether the Kodi Lees of the world should even be allowed to live in the first place.

According to the intellectual godfathers of the pro-abortion movement, Kodi Lee is one of the “defective” people who should’ve been killed in the womb.

Watch him perform and tell me he isn’t a divinely inspired talent.

Watch Kodi Lee perform and ask yourself, is the world a better place with or without him?

“You just changed the world,” America’s Got Talent judge Gabrielle Union told Kodi Lee after his performance.

Let’s hope she’s right.

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Jerry Bowyer: BJP’s Big Win in India

The Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi just won a massive re-election in India. For American conservatives, there’s a lot to like about Modi. India under his leadership has been a partner to the United States, both politically and economically.

But for Christians and all those concerned about religious liberty, Modi’s victory is nothing to celebrate. Modi is the head of the BJP—a Hindu nationalist party, which believes that Indian national identity is intrinsically tied to Hinduism.

According to the non-profit OpenDoorsUSA, India is now of the worst countries in the world for Christians. Modi’s government turns a blind eye to violence against Christians while it shuts down ministries.

Trump has a close relationship with Modi, and Modi wants to make it closer. The U.S. has the leverage in the relationship, so Trump should use it, and save the lives of Christians.

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Michael Medved: The Key Lesson of the D-Day Prayer

On the night of June 6, 1944, President Franklin Roosevelt spoke on the radio to announce the initial success of the D-Day invasion.

“Almighty God,” he began, urging the nation to join him in prayer. “Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.”

President Trump read those words 75 years later to commemorate the occasion.

Liberal hero though he was, FDR defined part of the war’s goal as defending “our religion.” He didn’t deny the crucial Protestant-Catholic divide, or ignore the presence in the ranks thousands of Jews and other non-Christians.

But Roosevelt’s words strongly implied a shared faith in America as an instrument of divine Providence “to set free a suffering humanity.” In today’s turmoil, may Americans rediscover that sense of common purpose.

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Albert Mohler: The Memory of Tiananmen; The Face of Communism

This week marked the 30th anniversary of one of the darkest days of the 20th century: On June 4, 1989 guns were fired and the tanks rolled against students who had assembled in China in historic Tiananmen Square in Beijing.

The students had begun gathering in mid-April, sensing what they thought was a cease in the political openness within China. They called for a multi-party system, rights for students, freedom of assembly and freedom of the press.

Western media were captivated by these courageous young protestors.

But in the hours between June 3 and 4, the Chinese Communist Party announced it was going to eliminate the protest.

Western estimates of the dead students range from several hundred to the far more credible several thousands.

There is one basic historical lesson of Tiananmen Square, and that is this: A Communist party in a one-party state does not give up its control without blood.

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Owen Strachan: Remembering the Heroes

It was bloody; it was awful; it was an operation of stupendous courage and shocking sacrifice.

75 years ago in Normandy, Operation Neptune—better known as “D-Day”—commenced. The Allied troops stormed the French beaches in order to overcome Nazi tyranny. The fighting was ferocious, with 4,000 confirmed dead on the Allied side on that one day alone.

The tone of the conflict had been set long before by British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. In an age of capitulation, Churchill dared to defy Nazi tyranny. He rallied England to defend the homeland and later rejoiced when America joined the campaign in 1941.

Churchill is famous for his leadership in World War II, and justly so. But Churchill is only the best known of the heroes of this era. Countless forgotten soldiers fought, bled, and died for the cause of freedom.

On the anniversary of D-Day, we remember their heroism—and hear them call us to the same.

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Michael Medved: The Issue of “Reparations” May Doom the Dems

More than a half-dozen Democrats running for president officially endorse the misguided notion of paying “reparations” to those whose distant ancestors were enslaved more than 150 years ago.

The New York Times recently explained that of 47 million Americans who identify as “African American,” only 30 million would receive payments—based on proof that an ancestor had lived in the pre-emancipation South.

This means Barack Obama would not receive reparations, because his father was born in Kenya, and his ancestors hadn’t been enslaved. But because Michelle Obama did have slave ancestors, the President’s daughters would qualify for payoffs.

Does this make any sense? Sasha and Malia grew up in wealth and luxury—why should they get compensation when their father, raised in much harsher circumstances, would not?

Obama, by the way, opposes reparations. He’s right. It’s an un-American idea that judges people on ancestry, not achievement, and will doom the Dems if they keep backing the concept.

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