Commentary

Albert Mohler: The Full Joy of Christmas

‘Tis the season for Christmas carols, and one of the most beautiful of our carols asks the most important question of all: “What child is this, who, laid to rest, on Mary’s lap is sleeping?” Christmas demands an answer to that question.

Even with all the fanfare and frantic activity of the season, that question remains. Even though commercialism and secularism and political correctness try to push the question aside, the question still stands. In the stillness of a winter’s night, the question rings out loudly and insistently – who is this child?

You know the carol’s answer: “This, this is Christ the king, whom shepherd’s guard and angels sing.” “Joy! Joy! For Christ is born. The babe, the son of Mary!” That is the true answer to the question – the baby is Christ the King. May you know the full joy of Christmas.

Merry Christmas.

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Hugh Hewitt: Christianity Today’s Bewildering Move

After more than a quarter-century of occasionally attempting to help direct traffic at the intersection of faith and politics, I have to admit: I am bewildered by Christianity Today editor Mark Galli’s column last week, wherein he called for the impeachment of President Trump.

Galli—on behalf of CT—has done exactly what has preceded every schism in every congregation ever: Take an absolutist stand on a radically divisive issue.

Why in the world would anyone seek an absolutist political opinion from a website about evangelical faith?

Most people aren’t looking to CT for direct advice on politics—and they’ll steer clear now of yet another politicized platform.

It’s laughable to say that there’s a clear, one-sided “Christian” appraisal of the case for or against the president.

In a democratic republic, the people decide.

When they do, they’ll end up giving the presidency back to Trump or to his opponent for reasons wholly unrelated to Christianity Today’s view on the question.

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Owen Strachan: Jesus, Born of a Woman

My soul magnifies the Lord,
and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
for he has looked on the humble estate of his servant.

Nearly two millennia ago, a young woman said these words. Mary had just heard the news that she would bear the Messiah, the Son of God, Jesus Christ. Christians all over the world celebrate the incarnation, the true reason for Christmas.

One truth of Christmas that we might miss amidst all else going on: truly, there is no more powerful affirmation in history of God’s design for women than the incarnation.

Our culture tells us it’s “pro-woman” but wars against women and the womb. In Scripture, Jesus is born of a woman. The Genesis curse on childbearing is overcome by God. The elegant distinctiveness of womanhood is elevated and affirmed, while the culture of death and abortion is rebuked.

Indeed: God has looked on our humble estate.

Merry Christmas.

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Proft: The Somber, Prayerful, Reluctant House Democrats


House Democrats were “somber,” “prayerful,” and “reluctant” about impeachment—or so they say.

But, on December 6, 2017, 58 House Democrats voted for impeachment over Trump’s criticism of NFL players who knelt during the national anthem.

And, on January 19, 2018, 66 House Democrats voted for impeachment over Trump’s use of coarse language to describe underdeveloped countries.

Then, on July 17, 2019, 95 House Democrats voted for impeachment over Trump’s insulting statements about “The Squad.”

This says nothing of Rep. Al Green’s demand Trump be impeached over his “racism” … and Rep. AOC’s contention that Trump should be impeached over the citizenship question the Department of Commerce attempted to put on the 2020 census questionnaire.

Yet, we are supposed to believe the House Democratic caucus is comprised of reasonable people who take their Constitutional oath seriously.

Democrats in the House have been thirsting for impeachment since inauguration day.

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Owen Strachan: Don’t Be Fooled By “Fairness for All”

When you hear the word “carve,” what image comes to mind? Some will think of a knife, slicing to the bone.

It’s a startling but fitting image for a proposed legislative measure called “Fairness for All.” This measure is being trumpeted in Utah and beyond as a means to advance LGBT rights and protections while offering “narrowly-defined carveouts for religious citizens and institutions.”

That phrase should send a chill down the spine of all who genuinely value First Amendment liberties. Instead of grounding our freedom in the Constitution and Bill of Rights, this legislation raises a new banner–expanding sexual liberties while boxing in religious liberty. It changes the standard of American practice from our founding documents to the new progressivist handbook. This handbook may trumpet “fairness,” but it offers anything but.

Instead of “narrow carveouts,” Americans should re-embrace the freedom that has made us unique from our founding.

It’s called the First Amendment.

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David Davenport: Finding Room At the Inn For Christ

You may recall that when Mary gave birth to Jesus, there was no room at the inn. Sadly, we are still fighting today over whether there is room for Christ in the public square.

Wisconsin legislators debate whether their tree is a Christmas tree or must now be a holiday tree. A student in California was told “Joy to the World” might be too religious for her piano assignment and to try “Jingle Bells” instead. A West Virginia mayor sought to rename a longstanding Christmas parade a “winter parade.”

There is no constitutional reason to cleanse the public square of Christ and Christmas. The inn should be open to all faiths, but that includes Christianity also. It is ironic that some feel the need to exclude Christmas in the name of being more inclusive.

And so, even in the public square, have yourself a Merry little Christmas.

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Jerry Bowyer: Paul Volcker and the Lessons of Conservatism

Paul Volcker—the legendary Federal Reserve chair—died early this month on December 8. Volcker fought to restore discipline to monetary policy after the easy money binge of the 70s and the resulting economic stagflation. Left-wing policies led to out-of-control inflation. Volcker made the tough choices—tightening money supply and killing inflation.

This came at the cost of deep economic pain, but Ronald Reagan did not pressure Volcker, focusing instead on tax cuts, persuading the nation to give the policy a chance to work.

Despite the constant economic and political pressure to turn the morphine drip back on, Volcker stayed the course—and annual inflation went from 15 percent all the way down to under 3 percent.

The lesson today is that easy money is not the answer to a flagging economy. Conservatives should take the lesson of Paul Volcker and stick with our principles.

Even when it’s tough.

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