Commentary

Lanhee Chen: 2020: A Contest Between Socialism and Capitalism

Twenty of the Democrats vying to be our next President finished two nights of debates, where it became very clear that the energy of the party was behind policies that would push America to the far left—making the Democrats of the past look like conservatives.

Several leading Democrats—including Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders—endorsed single-payer health care plans that would kick over 160 million Americans off the private health coverage they currently have and enjoy. Still others, like Julian Castro and Cory Booker, called for decriminalizing the act of crossing the U.S. border without authorization. And Warren led the charge for a multi-trillion dollar plan to forgive student debt.

Meanwhile, President Trump is gleefully waiting—essentially unopposed—to run against one of these Democrats next year. He’ll make the election a contest between socialism and capitalism. And I have a pretty good idea of which side of that argument will emerge victorious.

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Jerry Bowyer: Amazon Moves in a Chilling Direction

Amazon recently announced that it will no longer sell books by Dr. Joseph Nicolosi and others which help people deal with unwanted same-sex attraction.

With this, we’ve crossed a new boundary in the no-longer latent authoritarianism of the sexual revolution. In Judaism and Christianity, your nature is defined by God. In ancient Greek thought, it was defined by nature. Our modern on-going sexual revolution threw all of that aside and said that you define yourself, your will decides your identity.

But now even that restraint is being thrown off, and a one-way door is erected in its place. If you want to self-identify as gay, you can, and help is available. But if you want to self-identify as straight, the help window is slammed shut.

Amazon is moving in a chilling direction: from online book seller to online book censor.

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Medved: Distorting the True Nature of “Concentration Camps”


Most leaders of the Jewish community reacted with appropriate indignation to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez using the terms “concentration camps” and “never again” to compare Trump’s border policies to Hitler’s holocaust.

 An LA Times Op-Ed, however, outrageously supports her with the headline: “I’m Jewish and I don’t say this lightly: ‘Never Again’ is right now in America.”

 The opinion piece by David Ulin shrugs at the fact that the two key purposes of Nazi concentration camps—providing slave labor and perpetrating mass killing—have never been witnessed at border detention facilities. 

 Nazis ripped millions from their homes against their will, but today’s asylum seekers left home by choice to find refuge in America. But failure to welcome all-comers hardly amounts to Nazism. To claim otherwise distorts the true nature of the Holocaust and undermines our ability to resist real fascist dangers should they ever arise. 

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Hugh Hewitt: A Rare Bi-Partisan Opportunity for Congress

Older Americans face a housing crisis—and Congress has an opportunity to do something about it.

No: Retirement savings reform is not a hot topic for journalists, but it’s one of the few areas where Democrats and Republicans in Congress and President Trump could pull off some bipartisan reform when legislators reassemble in September.

Older Americans on fixed incomes face a housing crisis, and one part of that solution is retirement reform.

When Congress gets to gets back to business in the fall, they ought to consider how to help seniors stay in their homes as incomes decline or stop but mortgage payments stretch out into the future.

Retirement reform could allow seniors to pay off all or part of their home mortgage debt with money saved in their own retirement accounts without triggering taxes on the money used to do so.

Congress has an opportunity to take a big step toward solving one part of this problem.

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David Davenport: Localism Still Alive, Even in California

In a move with national implications, the California legislature halted a bill to force local governments to increase housing density. Think multiple homes on single lots and apartment buildings near transit centers.

It was a battle between Governor Gavin Newsom and Democrats on one side addressing a housing crisis, and California residents who had bought into their California dream communities on the other. Above all, it was a question of local control.

Liberals said there was no time to debate or compromise, this was a crisis. Everything in government is now wars and emergencies: Wars on poverty, crime, drugs, terror and 31 states of national emergency. We need action now.

Finally, a few Democrats who represented suburban districts said let’s take more time with this, seek something less extreme, find a compromise.

Good for them. Localism is still alive, even in California.

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Hugh Hewitt: After Mueller: The Tide Has Turned

After the latest testimony of former special counsel Robert Mueller, the tide has very clearly turned—and Trump now has a distinct advantage as we move into 2020.

No: President Trump has not yet been fully vindicated. Only his reelection will provide that.

But Trump has decisively repulsed the attempt to deny him the opportunity to win that vindication at the polls in November next year.

The president is now going on the offensive.

He’ll argue that the real scandal was the attempt to keep him from winning election and, once having won election, from governing. His opponents did so by shocking means far outside the norms of law and U.S. politics.

Trump will make this argument simply by force of repetition.

That the attack on Trump has decisively failed is not open to debate—except by people unfamiliar with “sunk costs.”

It was a terrible strategy from the start, that which the Democrats embrace, and it ended badly for everyone—except Donald Trump.

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Jerry Bowyer: A New Voice at the Fed

With economic commentator Steve Moore out of the running for Fed, President Trump has turned to another option, announcing his intent to appoint economist Judy Shelton.

Dr. Shelton is a superb choice.

Years ago, Shelton was one of the very few analysts to predict the fall of the Soviet Union long before it happened. Her conservative commitments are rock solid, having directed the Sound Money Project at the Atlas Foundation. Just last year she was successful in getting Senate confirmation as the U.S. director of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, so she’s already been thoroughly vetted—and would likely prevail in the confirmation process.

The stakes for the global economy have never been higher. We need a new voice at the Fed who can be a solid vote for the protection of monetary stability and who can handle herself at the table with the big boys.

Judy Shelton will do well. She should be confirmed.

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