Commentary

Albert Mohler: Ahmaud Arbery and the Rule of Law

The death of Ahmaud Arbery—a young black man in Georgia—has highlighted some big issues in the rule of law.

Last week we saw an arrest of two white men charged with murder and aggravated assault and the fatal shooting of the 25-year-old.

Once video of the incident surfaced on social media, the story rightfully exploded all over the media and the public consciousness.

Many are rightly asking why it took 74 days between the shooting and an eventual arrest.

The Attorney General in Georgia on Sunday announced doing just the right thing, that Georgia would ask the United States government through the Department of Justice to conduct an investigation—as the DOJ is uniquely equipped to do.

This is exactly what the rule of law looks like and we’ll be watching the case closely.

For now, our prayer must be with the Arbery family and with that community as they grieve their loss and as we look for justice.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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Albert Mohler: VE Day – 75 Years Later

It came at 2:41 AM on the 7th of May, 1945, the final unconditional surrender of Nazi forces. The surrender came as Nazi General, Alfred Jodl, came into a room and signed the unconditional surrender, which at that point was only 234 words in five paragraphs. That’s all it took.

But actually behind it, what it took was the death of approximately 100 million human beings in both theaters of the war. It took the largest military effort in all of human history to defeat Nazi Germany, but Nazi Germany was finally defeated. Adolf Hitler had committed suicide in his bunker in Berlin. Nazi Germany was a vanquished foe, and the unconditional surrender to which the Allied Forces had agreed was absolutely necessary. Finally, it was in hand.

Dwight David Eisenhower, the Supreme Commander of Allied Forces, would call General Omar Bradley and say simply, “Brad, it’s over.” And it was.

Sometimes, human history comes down to moments like that, moments we dare not forget—now 75 years later.

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Owen Strachan: In Appreciation of Mothers

In a tough time, here is something worth saying: Happy Mother’s Day.

Mother’s Day is a throwback to an era when it was clear that biology drove identity. With fatherhood, motherhood shaped personal existence. Motherhood was also distinct from fatherhood; mothers bless their families in countless ways, cooking, nurturing, teaching, and loving.

Motherhood has suffered many attacks of late. But it is not extinct, and we need it greatly. In a pandemic, many around us are watching mothers do even more than normal, with little time for release, relaxation and rest. Yet in such trying circumstances, gold is refined, and emerges all the brighter for it.

Some today do not adequately appreciate motherhood and womanhood. But many of us do; at least we try to. We watch mothers work their craft every day. We celebrate them; we thank them; with the deepest affection, we say that we love them.

Happy Mother’s Day.

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Owen Strachan: Not a Time to Panic

People find many things terrifying: pandemics, tsunamis, robberies, no Wi-Fi signal or a cable outage. Add something else to this sobering list: the cancellation of summer camp.

A tweet from the New York Post voiced this fear: Can parents survive months of hell as the coronavirus cancels summer camps? The Post article quoted one mother whose son can’t attend a $14,000 summer camp: “I’m 100 percent in panic mode.”

Every father and mother can attest to the unique challenges of this pandemic season. But there is much good at hand. Families need not panic; we can reconnect. Summer hours can be long, but we can redeem them. Tensions may rise at certain points, but we can practice forgiveness, humility, and character development.

We shouldn’t despise our children, and time with them; we should cherish our kids.

This is a time to persevere; to pray; to play. It’s certainly not a time to panic.

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Hugh Hewitt: Phase Four Legislation: What Should Be in It?

Congress is going to pass some sort of “Phase Four” relief package—simply because it must. It will likely be the most significant piece of spending legislation in my adult life.

What should be in it?

We absolutely must rebuild our defense industrial base. A strong defense will be essential for our response to the government whose negligence visited this pandemic on the world: the Chinese Communist Party.

Any subsequent help to the private sector cannot be advanced without liability protection. Federal law must preempt all state tort law concerning liability for coronavirus-related claims of negligence and intentional injury.

The collision with China has also put a new focus on Big Tech. These companies need to be pressed to side forthrightly and finally with the American republic that created the free minds and free markets that gave them birth.

“Phase Four” is shaping up to be the “law of a legislative lifetime.”

There’s no time to spare.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Coming Battle Over COVID

The vast fiscal crisis descending on states as a result of COVID-19 will challenge them all.

But the financial burdens brought about by massive tax-revenue losses caused by the virus should not be conflated with the preexisting financial conditions of many states.

Some states will try to secure financial bailouts for long-practiced profligacies and do so at the expense of the more thrifty, prudent states.

New York Governor Cuomo has been raising his voice, literally, trying to divert attention from this core dilemma, using the genuine suffering and an anti-McConnell press as a shield. But Governor Cuomo shouldn’t be allowed to cloud the clear vision of the massive problem.

The coming debate really isn’t about Trump, Cuomo or McConnell. It’s about structural federalism, the genius of our republic.

This isn’t about grace. Much grace, in the form of vast grants of funds, has already been given.

It’s about federalism.

And it’s about prudence.

That which gets rewarded gets repeated.

If we reward that financial mismanagement, we’ll get more of the same.

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