Commentary

Thornbury: Millennials And The Appeal Of Bernie

Greg Thornbury

One of the leading stories coming out of the New Hampshire primary was about how well the relatively elderly … let’s call them “mature”…  Democratic Presidential hopefuls fared among young people. Exit polls revealed that Bernie Sanders beat Hillary Clinton by an astounding margin of 85 to 15 percent among...

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Hewitt: The Scalia Seat

The death of the great Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has opened what is sure to be one of the great political battles of recent years. Whatever you’re political persuasion, one point needs to be understood: lame duck presidents don’t get to make successful nominations for lifetime appointments in an...

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Mohler: Antonin Scalia (1936-2016)

The nation has lost the most influential justice to sit on the Supreme Court in many decades. I’m referring, of course, to the death of Justice Antonin Scalia this past weekend. The loss of his influence, as well as his crucial vote, is monumental. Even before his nomination to the...

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Thornbury: Trump Explained

Greg Thornbury

The race for the White House remains as unpredictable as it is nasty. Out of the race now include Chris Christie, Mike Huckabee, Carly Fiorina and Rand Paul. Before he bowed out, Rand Paul was asked about his prospects. He responded with a very good point. He said that the...

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Mohler: The Word Of The Year

Jessica Bennett recently informed America in the New York Times that 334 linguists just became “the unlikely heroes of the new gender revolution.” How did they manage that, you say? Bennett explains that, “the 127-year-old American Dialect Society anointed ‘they,’ the singular, gender-neutral pronoun, the 2015 Word of the Year....

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Medved: Do Republicans Reject Talk Radio?

A new national poll by Wall Street Journal and NBC News exposes serious problems for the GOP—and for talk radio. On some issues, self-described Republicans express opinions you’d expect, with huge majorities backing traditional marriage, gun rights, and the right to life movement. But respondents were also asked, “Do you...

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Mohler: The Frustration Of The Elites

Intellectual, economic, political, and educational elites tend to meet together at one great event once a year, and it just took place last month in Davos in Switzerland for the World Economic Forum. It was a gathering of billionaires (by and large) and of political leaders. In Davos, it’s the...

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Medved: Bloomberg Candidacy Could Bring Chaos—and Shocking Surprises

If Michael Bloomberg runs for president as an independent, he won’t win the White House but he could provoke a Constitutional crisis. The former New York City mayor could plausibly win three or more states –say, New York, New Jersey and maybe Pennsylvania—which would deny either the Republican or Democratic...

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Davenport: The Civic Education Crisis

“Hamilton” is the hottest show on Broadway but its star character, Alexander Hamilton, barely gets a hearing in today’s student classrooms. Civic education is the crisis you don’t hear about.  In the last testing, only 18 percent of 8th graders were “proficient” or better in history and only 23 percent...

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Davenport: Warming To Socialism?

Are Americans becoming more socialist?  Shocking polls say “yes.” A Yougov survey in October showed Democrats favoring socialism over capitalism by 12 percent.  In November, a NYT/CBS News poll concluded that 56 percent of Democratic primary voters and 69 percent of Bernie Sanders’ supporters had a positive view of socialism. ...

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Medved: Iowa Proves It: Dems More Divided Than the GOP

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Democrats are more ideologically divided than Republicans—and the Iowa Caucuses proved it. Entrance Polls showed Republican voters expressing near unanimous support for conservative principles: a full 85 percent described themselves as “conservative” while only 15 percent saw themselves as “moderate or liberal.” Among Democrats who...

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Mohler: Elections Matter

Every election is a choice between worldviews. That’s what makes elections so important. We have become accustomed to the two main worldviews in America (liberalism and conservatism) generally being associated with the two main political parties. But now in the 2016 presidential election, we’re looking at a more confused picture....

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Mohler: Not As Secular As It Seems

As it turns out, the world isn’t quite as secular as it appears. Everyone has religious beliefs and sometimes even in a secular society those religious beliefs show through. Naomi Schaefer Riley recently reviewed Rodney Stark’s new book, “The Triumph of Faith.” Riley and Stark point to secularized Europe, and...

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Medved: A Lesson from Nature

The New York Times recently reported on new research on the origin of dogs, with unexpected lessons about the vital connection between family values and self-reliance. Dogs are closely related to wolves—so close, in fact, that dogs and wolves can interbreed easily and some scientists don’t even accept the idea...

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Mohler: Worldview Matters

Peter Beinart recently authored an important piece entitled “Why America Is Moving Left.” Writing in the Atlantic, he argues that regardless of who is elected this coming November, the nation is set on a more liberal trajectory. The Democratic nominee this year is almost certainly going to be more liberal,...

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