ADF

Commentary

Albert Mohler: A Choice of Parties, A Choice of Worldviews


After all the arguments, all the acrimony and all the issues that have been discussed, today the voters of the nation make their choices.

In contest after contest across the nation, voters face a choice between individual politicians. But it is also a contest between political parties.

But beyond that, it is a contest of ideas… it’s a battle of world views.

It’s an oft-repeated adage, but elections have consequences. Voters who might be disappointed with the outcome of an election have only themselves to blame if they didn’t vote in the election that has disappointed them. Yes, character matters, personality matters, ideas matter, world views matter and elections matter.

Make sure your vote is part of election day 2018 as the nation makes a decision today.

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Hugh Hewitt: A Closing Argument Voters Can Feel


On the Friday before Election Day, the Labor Department issued a blockbuster of a jobs report:

Employers added a full 250,000 jobs to their payrolls; the unemployment held at 3.7 percent—a 49-year low.
This comes as year-to-year wages grew 3.1 percent: that’s the biggest gain for hourly wage-earners since 2009.
If President Obama had delivered this sort of jobs report the Friday before the 2010 midterms, every elite outlet would have given it non-stop coverage through Election Day.

But … today … the last thing we’d expect is fair coverage of an economy driven by legislation passed by a GOP Congressional majority and a Trump White House.

If voters needed one more reason to return those GOP majorities to the House and Senate in January, that jobs report ought to be it.

It’s a closing argument, along with Brett Kavanaugh, that voters can feel in their pocketbook and in their hearts.

Today: It’s up you. Get out there and vote. Vote today.

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Albert Mohler: Our Obligations to the City of Man


On the first Tuesday of November every other year, Americans have the opportunity to exercise our voice—and our vote—in the ongoing American experiment of democracy.

Over the course of the last few years we’ve witnessed a heightening of the polarizing trends that have marked our electoral politics for the greater portion of the last two decades. The tone or the tension that marks our political discourse, I’m sure, turns off many voters.

So how should we respond on Election Day 2018?

As a Christian, my convictions are shaped by the great Christian theologian Augustine, who developed thought on our two citizenships—one to the City of God, one to the City of Man.

There is much more that could be said about this, but—given the fact that we live in a democracy—our minimum obligations to the City of Man are that we vote.

Make it a point to vote.

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Michael Medved: Vote for Collaboration Over Confrontation


Americans of every perspective say they’re disgusted by the polarization, pettiness and unbridled anger that have come to characterize our politics.

The great majority of us say we want more cooperation and civility, but there’s only one way to vote for those qualities on Tuesday. If the Democrats win control of the House of Representatives, they’ve promised aggressive new initiatives for impeachment and investigation, and I believe they’d keep those promises—with two more years of determined efforts to destroy the president.

Republicans, on the other hand, may not agree with Trump on everything, but they’re determined to work with him for a program of constructive reform. If we really do want a new era of growth and gains, rather than more grating gridlock, GOP victory is essential. Vote for collaboration over confrontation on November 6th.

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Jim Daly: Indifference Is Not a Viable Option


Would you be surprised if I told you that an election in Kentucky 34 years ago changed the course of American  history? It’s true.

On November 6 1984, a 44-year-old Republican judge defeated Walter D. Huddleston, one of the state’s incumbent senators by just 5,000 votes.

It would have been impossible for those Kentucky voters to have foreseen the impact their vote would have, but without that judge there would be no Justice Gorsuch or Justice Kavanaugh.

That’s right: the judge who won this upset election was Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell.

It was Plato who said that the penalty good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men. We either cast our vote or we lose the right to gripe about our government

So, please: vote on November 6th.

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Hugh Hewitt: Key Races in the Battle for the Senate


Rick Scott has been a great governor for Florida. He will be a great senator for the Sunshine State—and he deserves support over the nearly invisible incumbent Bill Nelson.

Kevin Cramer, Congressman from North Dakota, has been a stalwart for farmers and energy producers—and he deserves support against incumbent Democrat Heidi Heitkamp who’s a sure vote to put Chuck Schumer in charge of the United States Senate with all that that means for the country.

Josh Hawley in Missouri and Patrick Morrisey in West Virginia are also running against Democratic incumbents in Missouri and West Virginia respectively—Claire McCaskill and Joe Manchin. Missouri voters need to put Hawley in D.C. and West Virginia voters ought to send Morrisey to the Capitol.

Both have been excellent attorney generals of their states.

To summarize: we need Scott, Cramer, Hawley and Morrisey in the Senate.

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Michael Medved: Beto’s Blunder


Congressman Beto O’Rourke has broken fund-raising records in his challenge to Texas Senator Ted Cruz, but on a CNN townhall this new liberal “Wonder Boy” made comments that should doom his $60 million campaign and terminate his political future.

The Congressman re-affirmed that he’s ready to vote to impeach President Trump for collusion and obstruction, even before Mueller finishes his investigation or produces evidence of guilt. Dozens of other Democrats have taken similar positions, and expressed the even more bizarre hope of impeaching and investigating Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh.

During the Kavanaugh confirmation process, most Americans felt rightly disgusted by the bitterness, hysteria, wild-charges and character assassination.

Beto’s blunder makes it obvious to all that anyone who votes for Democratic Congressional or Senatorial candidates is voting for more of the same.

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