ADF

Commentary

David Davenport: The Trump Flurry

Not since the days of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, under the pressures of the Great Depression, have we seen an opening presidential act like Donald Trump’s. We have sent special forces to Yemen, left the Trans Pacific Trade Agreement, reopened major pipeline projects, nominated a Supreme Court justice, and changed the rules of immigration. At least one of his executive orders on travel is likely on its way to the Supreme Court.

We’ve seen strange scenes—Democrats holding a Senate sleepover to oppose a cabinet nominee, followed by the Vice President showing up to break a tie vote. We have praised old enemies and insulted allies.

Wow!

How do we account for this presidential flurry of activity?  Some think Trump likes to create distractions, overwhelming the media and the government.  Perhaps it’s his businessman’s inclination to tackle several things at once.

But clearly both the media and the government will need to adjust to a new pace and a new style.  If people wanted change in Washington, they are certainly getting it.

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David Davenport: The Power and Peril of Executive Orders and Party-Line Votes

In his first week in office, President Donald Trump managed to undo much of President Obama’s legacy via executive orders. This is a cautionary tale that presidents who lead by unilateral action, and pass important laws with party-line votes, can see their legacy quickly undone by the next president using the same tools. Immigration, health care, pipelines and environmental regulations—all changed with the stroke of pen.

How could that happen to Obamacare?—arguably the most important piece of domestic legislation in 50 years? It’s easy—when Democrats chose to pass it quickly on a party-line vote, the new Congress can repeal it on their own party-line vote.

Government used to be about deliberation, sitting down together to discuss policy, make amendments, build support. Now it’s about action and war on both sides.

The seeds of the Trump revolution were planted in the Obama years when he went too far left without broad support.  A cautionary tale, but is anyone listening?

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Lanhee Chen: California Adrift

single-payer

In a pre-Super Bowl interview, President Trump said that California “in many ways, is out of control.”

California’s leaders don’t want to admit it, but he’s right on this one.
The president was making specific reference to legislation written by the top Democrat in the California State Senate, which would effectively turn the entire state into a “Sanctuary City,” prohibiting state or local authorities from enforcing federal immigration law.

Such legislation is an affront to those who believe in the rule of law.
California Democrats—led by Governor Jerry Brown—have decided their best strategy is simply to say “no” to everything President Trump proposes.

That’s too bad, because there are areas of potential bipartisan cooperation between the Golden State and the new administration in Washington—health care reform, infrastructure construction or maybe even energy policy.

Governor Brown and the state’s leaders should seek opportunities to cooperate and improve conditions for California’s residents. They surely won’t agree with President Trump on much, but they owe it to the people of California to govern maturely and responsibly.

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Lanhee Chen: Tom Price: The Right Man for HHS

single-payer

Later this week, the Senate will take up the nomination of Dr. Tom Price to be the next Secretary of Health and Human Services. Dr. Price is uniquely qualified for the job—he’s a physician with real-world experience who also has an excellent understanding of the health policy challenges facing our country.

During his time in Congress, Dr. Price wrote a market-based health care reform plan that will lower costs, expand access and enhance innovation. Indeed, the Price plan will serve as a template for reform in the months ahead.

Unfortunately, Senate Democrats have engaged in an unprecedented level of hyper-partisanship during the confirmation processes of Dr. Price and other cabinet nominees. In fact, they have voted for fewer of the majority party’s nominees than any other minority party in American history.  And they’ve resorted to character assassination against Dr. Price and other Trump cabinet nominees.

It’s sad, because good men like Tom Price are waiting to serve.  Our leaders in Washington should put petty partisanship aside and vote to confirm Dr. Price without delay.

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Albert Mohler: Exactly What We Need on the High Court

Headlines

There are many reasons to be enthusiastic about President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, not least of which is the judge’s deep knowledge and appreciation for conservative philosophy and natural law.

While taking a Doctor of Philosophy degree at Oxford University, Judge Gorsuch wrote a book based on his dissertation entitled “The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.” In it he writes, “Private intentional acts of homicide are always wrong. Recognizing human life as intrinsically, not instrumentally, valuable will rule out assisted suicide and euthanasia.”

That’s the sort moral reasoning that is so sorely needed on the nation’s highest court, understanding life itself as a fundamental good. That is not a direct reference to abortion; it doesn’t have to be. It’s a direct reference to what should be very obvious to any intelligent and sensitive human being. And that is that human life is a fundamental good; it is an intrinsic good.

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Hewitt: Gorsuch Exceedingly Qualified

FISA

As a conservative who had questions about Donald Trump, I am very happy that I voted for him and campaigned for him during the summer. The President’s first two weeks have been about keeping campaign promises.

Judge Neil Gorsuch is an exceedingly qualified Supreme Court nominee, at least as well qualified as any other conservative in America.

I applaud President Trump for encouraging the Senate to invoke the Reid rule and lower the confirmation threshold from 60 to 51 votes, rolling right over a filibuster from the Democrats should they choose to bring one.

There are 103 vacancies on the federal courts right now. Judge Gorsuch is the most important battle, but Republicans must ensure that good, originalist judges who will apply the Constitution as it was written are confirmed across the board.

The American people want a judiciary that umpires the game and doesn’t decide the game. They voted for this Supreme Court justice and for President Trump to make these picks.

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Albert Mohler: That “Flickering” on the Ultrasound Screen

Headlines

Last week, writing at The Atlantic, Moira Weigel asserted that ultrasound technology has been used by pro-life politicians to deceptively suggest that the fetus is a person.

Weigel even suggests that a baby’s heartbeat visible on an ultrasound is not really a heartbeat at all, but merely “a flickering that takes place between 120 and 160 times per minute on a black-and-white playback screen.”

Sean Davis, of The Federalist, rightly responds, “Like most treatises from abortion activists about how babies aren’t real people, Weigel’s comes across more as a sad attempt to convince herself than a credible attempt to convince her readers. No amount of euphemisms can obscure the truth that unborn babies are alive, that their hearts beat just as ours do, and that the abortion industry is dead set on killing as many of them as possible.”

What we face—as I’ve said before—is a war of worldviews.

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