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Commentary

Michael Medved: When Political Correctness Tops Personal Decency

Opioid

The New York Times recently reported on allegations of shameless sexual harassment by Oscar-winning movie mogul Harvey Weinstein from dozens of young women.

In his bizarre response, Weinstein acknowledged that he “caused a lot of pain” and planned to temporarily step back from corporate power in order to concentrate on therapy. He also promised to compensate for his wrong-doing and “channel that anger” by launching a major campaign against the NRA, while pledging “to make a movie about our president” in order to force Trump’s retirement.

In other words, the guilt-ridden executive hoped for redemption by bashing political opponents rather than improving himself, implying that however badly he behaved, conservatives are worse. He thereby embraced the classic leftist fantasy: that political correctness matters more than destructive personal behavior, no matter how loathsome.

Emphasizing public posturing above private conduct can’t deliver either personal happiness or societal decency.

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Jerry Bowyer: On Tax Reform: Businesses Take “Wait and See” Approach

Jordan Peterson

Republican leaders are now out with their proposal for tax reform.

The good news is the plan is pro-growth. It really could get us out of the lurch, giving corporations a mechanism to bring almost 3 trillion dollars home from abroad, and to reinvest that money right here … in America.

The bad news—or the concerning news—is we’re running out of time.

The plan allows businesses to fully expense many equipment purchases. But until the tax passes, business are going to take a “wait and see” approach.

Why buy equipment now if you can wait till tax reform passes?—when you can then buy and deduct the expense right away?

If the tax reform takes too long to pass, the economy will slow, and the GOP could enter a mid-term election in the midst of a slow-down or even a recession—and they’ll pay a price.

No, this tax plan is not perfect, but it’s a vast improvement over what we have now.

Republicans and moderate Democrats ought to move quickly to pass it.

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Albert Mohler: Marriage For “Most Privileged” Americans

Billy Graham

Something is happening to the American family.

Claire Cain Miller, writing at the New York Times, reports that—quote: “Marriage, which used to be the default way to form a family in the United States, regardless of income or education, has become yet another part of American life reserved for those who are most privileged.”

Back in the 1960s, it was the children of privilege who declared themselves independent of marriage. But as it turned out over time, those who have a greater economic investment tend to be far more conservative in terms of their actual lifestyle choices.

So the more education and income one has, the argument goes, the more an individual has to lose by making bad choices. Conversely, someone with very little income and who sees very little opportunity in the future effectively has less to lose by making those same bad choices.

In reality—as Brad Wilcox from the University of Virginia argues—there is a well-defined success sequence: finish school, get married, then have kids. Breaking that success sequence is one of the most fundamental problems we now face.

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Jerry Bowyer: Tax Reform and a Chance to Make up for Lost Decade

Jordan Peterson

Last week, Republican leaders announced their tax reform plans.

The good news is that they’re pro-growth: US corporate tax rates are today the highest in the developed world, and our current system perversely punishes American companies for bringing profits back from their foreign sales. The GOP plan fixes that problem. It also cuts taxes for what has been labeled “flow through” businesses —small and family-owned businesses often use that form. My own family business uses it. The reason it’s important to cut taxes these types of small businesses is because American jobs are almost all created the same way: by small businesses becoming big businesses.

It’s been a pretty bad decade for the U.S. economy: a terrible recession followed by barely a whiff of a recovery.

That lost decade has cost us standing abroad and frayed the social fabric at home. We can end that by embracing the growth model of JFK, Reagan and Gingrich/Clinton.

Americans can’t afford another lost decade.

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Albert Mohler: The Acknowledgment Of Evil In The Wake Of Las Vegas Shooting

Billy Graham

President Trump made a very important point in his response to the recent shooting in Las Vegas when he called it an “act of pure evil.”

The judgment of evil here, real evil, should be beyond dispute.

Evil is a fact, too. The secular worldview cannot use the word with coherence or sense. The acknowledgement of evil requires the affirmation of a moral judgment and a moral reality above human judgment. If we are just accidental beings in an accidental universe, nothing can really be evil. Evil points to a necessary moral judgment made by a moral authority greater than we are — a transcendent and supernatural moral authority: God.

It is both telling and reassuring that secular people, faced with moral horror as we see now in Las Vegas, can still speak of evil as a moral fact—even if they continue to deny moral facts in the classrooms and courtrooms. No one can deny that the horror in Las Vegas came about by an act that was evil, pure evil, and evil as a fact.

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Michael Medved: Ignoring The Vegas Killer’s Obvious Addiction

Opioid

While motives behind the Las Vegas massacre remained very much in doubt, liberal pundits still rushed to blame the killer’s fascination with firearms for pushing an ordinary man to mass murder.

Actually, Stephen Paddock nursed another obsession far longer, and far more intensively, than he ever indulged an interest in guns—and that dangerous obsession has largely escaped condemnation in discussions of his horrifying crime.

For more than a decade, Paddock devoted most of his time and energy to compulsive gambling and—along with six million other American adults and half-million teenagers qualified as an obvious “problem gambler.” More than three quarters of those so afflicted suffer from clinical depression, and the problem impacts low income households far more commonly than it harms rich retirees like the Vegas killer.

Rather than encouraging gambling by promoting lotteries and casinos, government should try to limit damage from a devastating addiction that costs Americans $150 billion in annual losses.

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Albert Mohler: Hugh Hefner and a New Sort of Enslavement

Billy Graham

If there were to be a single, most powerful symbol of the sexual revolution in the 20th century, that symbol as an individual would’ve been Hugh Hefner — the founder of Playboy magazine who died recently at age 91.

The 20th century was the great century of sexual revolution. One of the driving engines of that change was the modern industry of pornography—and you cannot separate that industry from the one man who made it most mainstream and most profitable.

The Playboy founder sought to redefine not only femininity in terms of pornography but also masculinity in terms of a kind of sophisticated, urban model that would be very attracted to pornography in terms of a normal pursuit and a normal entertainment.

By any analysis, what Hefner left behind as his contribution to our society is not only a breaking down of an old sexual morality, it is the new enslavement of people who declare themselves liberated and “free,” but are absolutely enslaved to pornography.

That’s the real legacy of Hugh Hefner.

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