Commentary

Michael Medved: Divided Dems Can’t Exploit Trump’s Biggest Vulnerability

The Democrats suffer from deep, potentially deadly divisions – exemplified by the bitter sniping between Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the anti-American radicals of the ultra-progressive “squad” in the House of Representatives, along with the party’s circular firing squad of two dozen embattled presidential candidates.

These feuds not only chew up liberal resources, energy and credibility, but also destroy Democrat chances of capitalizing on Trump’s greatest vulnerability: his disappointing failure at unifying the country and his reckless promotion of partisan polarization. If Democrats can’t even work together on their own side of the aisle, how can they promise to bring the whole country together?

At least Trump has managed to enlist the great majority of Republicans on his team, while the Democrats continue to fracture and quibble just as the campaign moves into a more serious phase.

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Mohler: Gender Ideology Spurs Fundamental Breakdown of Meaning and Language


A recent article in New York Times Magazine illustrates for us the quandary of the gender revolution and the breakdown of language.

It was a massive essay entitled, “The Struggles of Rejecting the Gender Binary.”

The subject of the article wants to be known by the pronouns that are supposedly gender-neutral—they/them …

… so I marked all of the confusing personal pronouns that I could discover in this multi-thousand word article. I found at least 171 times where the pronoun simply doesn’t make sense.

How in the world do you have any kind of language coherence when pronouns become a matter of gender ideology and you have people saying, “I am no longer a he or she, I am a them or a they”?

What we’re seeing is a fundamental breakdown of meaning and that seen in a breakdown of language.

It’s a subversion of truth.

There can be no coherence on the other side of such a breakdown.

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Michael Medved: Joe Biden: Combining Radical Substance with Moderate Style?


In campaigning for president, Joe Biden faces a difficult dilemma: if he moves left to placate his party’s increasingly socialistic base, he’ll lose the moderate support he needs to challenge Donald Trump. But if he runs as a compromising centrist, enraged party progressives will block his nomination.

The problem is that satisfying progressives requires such radical positions—like racial reparations, forgiving student loans, and banning private health insurance—that middle-of-the-road voters won’t be reassured by an easy-going style. If the election becomes a referendum on a stridently leftist Democratic platform, Republicans should be able to build a big majority in opposition.

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David Davenport: The Elephant In The Policy Room


You would never know this listening to presidential candidates but Social Security, in crisis mode for a while, will begin paying out more than it takes in next year. The reserve fund will be depleted in 16 years, meaning seniors would face 20 percent cuts in their payments.

Roughly half of Americans rely on Social Security for most of their retirement income. And with baby boomers retiring and living longer, the numbers will only get worse.

While Democrats talk about welfare and socialism, and Republicans love their tax cuts, we still need to pay for the entitlements we already have such as Social Security and Medicare.

Fixing this will take several things Washington hardly does anymore: exercise fiscal discipline, debate and deliberate, and come to some kind of bipartisan agreement.

Party line vote—the new normal in Washington—will not do the trick

Social Security needs a fix.

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Michael Medved: Motivated by the Destructive Power of Politics


A new poll from the Wall Street Journal and NBC News shows Americans are slightly schizophrenic in their attitude toward politics. More people than ever before say they’re interested, even absorbed, with the politics of the moment, but less than a third believe in government’s power to address “long term challenges.”

An amazing 87 percent say “politics is important to them” — that’s three times the percentage expressing similar sentiment in 1990.

Why are people so intrigued when they have so little confidence that our leaders can solve problems?

It could be that they’re afraid of government’s destructive potential, worrying more about its capacity to hurt than they hope for its ability to help. Another poll from Pew Research shows 85 percent agree that “the tone and nature of political debate” has become more negative in recent years, and any honest observer should recognize the depressing, downward trajectory.

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Hugh Hewitt: Revolution for Fairness on the Courts


Last month, the Ninth Circuit of the Federal Courts, which includes eight western states and some territories, held one of its en banc sessions. Because of the size of this Court, which includes 29 active judgeships, an en banc panel doesn’t include all of the judges but only a so-called “draw” of 11. Important cases get this treatment. In June, for the first time in memory, the draw of 11 featured a majority of judges appointed by a Republican president.

This says nothing about the outcome of the case or whether it will prove a blockbuster, but it tells everyone that President Trump and Senate Majority Leader McConnell’s focused efforts to restore balance to all of the circuits are paying off.

President Trump has seen 41 of his circuit court nominees confirmed.

It’s a revolution for fairness on the courts and for all litigants and one voters should in 2020 should endorse continuing.

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Michael Medved: Attacking the Founders’ Flag

Former quarterback Colin Kaepernick, best known for his protests during the national anthem, has launched new attacks against the “The Betsy Ross Flag,” used by patriots during the Revolution.

Under pressure from Kaepernick, Nike canceled plans for special edition sneakers decorated with the flag, featuring a circle of thirteen stars representing the thirteen rebellious colonies. All of them allowed slavery, so Kaepernick connects them to “white supremacy.”

This ignores impassioned, anti-slavery patriots – like Adams, Franklin and Hamilton – as well as Betsy Ross herself. Historians debate whether she designed the flag personally, but we do know she came from a devout Quaker family – and Quakers led anti-slavery activism in America. What’s more, Betsy’s home colony of Pennsylvania was the first to abolish slavery – in 1780, 7 years before the Constitution.

Slurs against our Founders and their banner are not only foolish, but ignorant.

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