ADF

Commentary

Jerry Bowyer: Maybe the Tax Cuts Really Are Working


Recently, the government announced that last quarter, the U.S. economy grew at 4.2 percent. That’s more than 2 ½ times the average growth rate during the past ten years. Predictably, critics of the President and his tax policies claim tax cuts had nothing to do with it. For them It’s just a coincidence that after a decade of stagnation the economy just happened to perk up right after the tax cut.

Business profits have also spiked since the tax cuts. And take-home pay is up more than 5 percent in the last year. More coincidences?

Or: Perhaps the tax cuts are actually working as intended, removing the punishing rates of taxation on profits, increasing output, creating more jobs and higher pay rates for those jobs.

It worked under Kennedy, Reagan and G.W. Bush.

Now it’s working for Trump and for America.

Read More »

Michael Medved: A Victory for Respectful Persuasion


An unexpectedly encouraging development in California should remind us that conversation can work better than confrontation in politics. The author of Assembly Bill 2943 agreed to pull it from the legislature’s agenda—dropping a new law that would have imposed severe penalties on mental health professionals who agreed to help patients wanting to overcome homosexual inclinations.

Evan Low, a gay, Silicon Valley Democrat, had majority support in the legislature but he changed his plan because he felt “heartened by conversations…. with pastors, professional counselors and former homosexuals who lead ministries to others.”

This is a demonstration of the power of respectful persuasion and both sides deserve praise.

Read More »

Lanhee Chen: Hysterical Opposition to Kavanaugh


Some Democrats are hysterical over the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to be the next Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, but they couldn’t have picked a more reasonable and thoughtful jurist to get worked up about.  Even a liberal law professor at Yale recently opined in the New York Times that Judge Kavanaugh is a “superb” nominee and his legal chops are rivaled only by some of our country’s most notable jurists.  

Indeed, those who support the rule of law have much to look forward to in a Justice Kavanaugh. He shows a reverence for the Constitution and a healthy skepticism of unbridled powers for the federal bureaucracy.  

Which brings us back to politics: Democrats have pledged to oppose him simply because he was nominated by a Republican. Let’s hope they reconsider—and give this good man the support he deserves.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Earth-shaking Developments in the Catholic Church


The recent revelations of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church are unprecedented. I’m referring first to the Grand Jury report that came from Pennsylvania. That was followed by the report from the former ambassador from the Vatican to the United States of America. Archbishop Vigano, in his 11-page letter, accuses the highest leadership of the Catholic church—including the Pope himself—of covering up this sexual corruption and, specifically, protecting the now-disgraced former Cardinal Archbishop in Washington, D.C.

We have as a result one of the biggest stories in international religious life over the course of our lifetimes.

We are witnessing right now earth-shaking developments within the Roman Catholic Church—developments that should be of interest not only to Roman Catholics, but to all Americans.

In the words of author and blogger Rod Dreher, Vigano has, “Dropped an atomic bomb on Francis’s papacy.”

Read More »

Lanhee Chen: The Passing of John McCain


The passing of American hero John McCain left a giant hole in our politics. Some worry about what it means for strong leadership in the Senate. While it will be hard for any single individual to replace Senator McCain, Republicans, in particular, should take heart: There’s a very strong crop of current GOP Senate candidates who have an opportunity to carry on McCain’s important work.

Mitt Romney, who will likely be Utah’s next U.S. Senator, leads the pack. Then there’s Martha McSally from Arizona; Rick Scott from Florida; John James from Michigan; and Josh Hawley from Missouri, just to name a few.

Elections matter, and this year’s congressional elections are particularly critical. These candidates could serve and—in their own way—carry on Senator McCain’s indelible legacy.

Now: It’s up to voters around the country to send them to Washington to get to work.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: It’s Much Bigger Than Jack Phillips


Earlier this year, the nation’s highest court handed down a decision in the case of Jack Phillips, the baker from Colorado who had been found guilty by the state’s Civil Rights Commission of having violated the rights of LGBT persons by refusing to create cakes with certain messages.

The result was a seven-two decision in favor of Jack.

But now Jack—after the US Supreme Court victory—has some of the very same folks coming back for him again.

Alliance Defending Freedom—the group that successfully defended Jack Phillips all the way to the Supreme Court—is representing him again.

What you haven’t seen reported much is that this is—to put it succinctly—a scam. His opponents in Colorado have made a crusade out of pestering him with outrageous cake requests and then complaining to state officials when he refuses.

The issues here are much bigger than just Jack Phillips.

Read More »

Michael Medved: The Republican Challenge With Young Voters


Political analysts give plenty of attention to our partisan divisions according to race or gender, but not enough to the stark differences based on age. The good news for Republicans is that the Democrats are entirely reliant on young voters. Among Americans over 30 in 2016, Trump won the popular vote by a decisive margin, but among the 19 percent of voters below 30 he lost by a crushing landslide of 20 points.

The bad news is nearly all these young people will be voting again. Meanwhile, the over-65 segment—the strongest age group for Trump—gets steadily thinned by the actuarial realities.

Unless we can swing those youthful voters toward conservative ideas, emphasizing better plans for their present and future, the prospects for the Republican party may be grim.

Read More »