Commentary

Albert Mohler: Methodists Say “No” to the Sexual Revolution

The United Methodist Church has defied mainline Protestant history by saying “no” to the sexual revolution in a crucial vote.

The news came as a result of action at the St. Louis meeting, there was a special general conference of the United Methodist Church—the last mainline Protestant denomination that had not fully surrendered to the LGBTQ revolution.

By a narrow vote of delegates, the denomination voted to uphold biblical standards of sexual morality, the historic teachings of the United Methodist Church consistent with 2,000 years of church history defining marriage exclusively as the union of a man and a woman.

The narrow vote does not once-for-all answer the future direction of the denomination. But it does point to the strains within just one church that are untenable and unbearable. They cannot last.

But the big news is this: A major, mainline denomination has said “no” to the sexual revolution.

Let’s see how the liberal power structures in that denomination and in others respond.

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David Davenport: What a National Emergency Actually Means

Few Americans realize that they currently live under some 30 states of national emergency, the oldest declared by President Jimmy Carter during the Iran hostage crisis 40 years ago. Actual emergencies come and go but emergency declarations live on.

The primary effect of a national emergency is to shift power from Congress to the president, as President Trump wanted to build his wall. Along with executive orders and domestic policy wars on poverty, crime, drugs and terror, presidents since Lyndon Johnson have been moving power from one end of Pennsylvania Avenue to the other.

But politically, it’s a two-edged sword. When presidents seek to do things unilaterally, these actions are easily canceled and replaced by the next president. Perhaps you recall how quickly President Trump undid President Obama’s executive orders.

One day Congress will wake up and notice its primary powers are lost.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Lessons of History and the Green New Deal

By now you have all heard about the Green New Deal. It doesn’t take a very long memory to know that this sort of massive spending plan will collapse the economy.

You see, the European debt crisis was triggered in part by plans very much like those recommended in the Green New Deal: Heavy subsidies for so-called green tech, utopian timelines for alternative energy usage, and punitive treatment on the kinds of energy which our economy actually depends on. The result? Greece and Spain and Italy triggered a crisis that jeopardized the future of the entire European Union.

If eight years ago is ancient history for AOC and her zealots, how about three months? France instituted a tiny version of the same thing—and even France abandoned it. Experience is a great tutor, but her tuition can be very expensive for those who refuse to learn from the failures of others.

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Dan Proft: Hate Has a Home on the Left

If you have to pass a resolution saying we, in the House, won’t tolerate anti-Semitism, what does that say about what you, in the House, have really been tolerating?

Even more astounding than the panoply of vile statements that earned Rep. Ilhan Omar an endorsement from the KKK’s David Duke is the enabling of anti-Semitism by Jewish members of Congress.

The whole Omar affair is illustrative of identity politics. The pursuit of political power demands some cultural Marxists create an identity while others abandon theirs. The key is everyone plays nice on the noxious, intersectional playground.

So Rachel Dolezal is black. Caitlyn/Bruce Jenner is a woman. And Rep. Jan Schakowsky is an apologist for anti-Semitism who chalks up Omar’s intemperance to a cultural difference suggesting that Omar didn’t say what she said and didn’t mean what she meant.

It turns out hate does have a home on the Left.

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Jerry Bowyer: What to Do for a Slowing Economy

The Trump tax cuts have done great things for our economy, but—as I’ve warned—the economy is slowing down somewhat. The new GDP report shows the growth rate last quarter dropped from an above average 3.4 to a below average 2.6 percent. Overall, 2018 was a good year for the economy, but at the end it lost some steam, but we can get it back.

First, get out of the trade war. It’s made trade deficits higher and hitting farmers particularly hard. We’ve already created the conditions for American economic preeminence with the tax cuts, let them do their thing and let’s not seize defeat out of the jaws of victory.

Second, stabilize the dollar. America became the envy of the world when the dollar was stable in terms of gold and the currencies of other trading partners.

With just a few changes, we can unleash the American economy.

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Michael Medved: A Message to Representative Omar

Imagine if conservatives had attacked freshman Congress member Ilhan Omar by questioning her loyalty to the United States and suggesting that she cared more about her Muslim faith or her Somali homeland than she did about America.

Democrats along with all right-thinking people would have been outraged at the bigoted nature of such an assault, but Omar herself has repeatedly slammed her pro-Israel colleagues on a similarly unacceptable basis. Her most recent comments claim that Israel supporters “push for allegiance to a foreign country.”

This is no more appropriate than prior slanders against Catholic Americans for “allegiance” to the Vatican over loyalty to America, or potential claims against Omar and Muslim colleagues for giving devotion to Islam above the Constitution.

It’s always okay to challenge the judgment of Jewish or Christian supporters of Israel, but it’s never appropriate to question their patriotism.

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Lanhee Chen: Democrats Push Single Payer

Democrats introduced single-payer health care legislation last week that—if passed—would move every American into a single, government-run insurance program, within two years. The bill already has over 100 co-sponsors in the U.S. House, and many of the Democratic Party’s candidates for president in 2020 are sure to endorse it too.

But, as with other plans to bring socialized medicine to all Americans, this single-payer legislation has plenty of drawbacks.

Like your current coverage? Say goodbye to it. Value your relationship with your doctor? Time to find a new one. Think health care spending in the U.S. is high now? Wait until you see what happens if the Democrats’ proposal actually becomes law.

One more thing: The Democrats have no explanation for how the system would be paid for.

But, don’t worry. I’m sure they’ll find the estimated $30 trillion somewhere.

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