Commentary

Medved: Distorting the True Nature of “Concentration Camps”


Most leaders of the Jewish community reacted with appropriate indignation to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez using the terms “concentration camps” and “never again” to compare Trump’s border policies to Hitler’s holocaust.

 An LA Times Op-Ed, however, outrageously supports her with the headline: “I’m Jewish and I don’t say this lightly: ‘Never Again’ is right now in America.”

 The opinion piece by David Ulin shrugs at the fact that the two key purposes of Nazi concentration camps—providing slave labor and perpetrating mass killing—have never been witnessed at border detention facilities. 

 Nazis ripped millions from their homes against their will, but today’s asylum seekers left home by choice to find refuge in America. But failure to welcome all-comers hardly amounts to Nazism. To claim otherwise distorts the true nature of the Holocaust and undermines our ability to resist real fascist dangers should they ever arise. 

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Hugh Hewitt: A Rare Bi-Partisan Opportunity for Congress

Older Americans face a housing crisis—and Congress has an opportunity to do something about it.

No: Retirement savings reform is not a hot topic for journalists, but it’s one of the few areas where Democrats and Republicans in Congress and President Trump could pull off some bipartisan reform when legislators reassemble in September.

Older Americans on fixed incomes face a housing crisis, and one part of that solution is retirement reform.

When Congress gets to gets back to business in the fall, they ought to consider how to help seniors stay in their homes as incomes decline or stop but mortgage payments stretch out into the future.

Retirement reform could allow seniors to pay off all or part of their home mortgage debt with money saved in their own retirement accounts without triggering taxes on the money used to do so.

Congress has an opportunity to take a big step toward solving one part of this problem.

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David Davenport: Localism Still Alive, Even in California

In a move with national implications, the California legislature halted a bill to force local governments to increase housing density. Think multiple homes on single lots and apartment buildings near transit centers.

It was a battle between Governor Gavin Newsom and Democrats on one side addressing a housing crisis, and California residents who had bought into their California dream communities on the other. Above all, it was a question of local control.

Liberals said there was no time to debate or compromise, this was a crisis. Everything in government is now wars and emergencies: Wars on poverty, crime, drugs, terror and 31 states of national emergency. We need action now.

Finally, a few Democrats who represented suburban districts said let’s take more time with this, seek something less extreme, find a compromise.

Good for them. Localism is still alive, even in California.

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Hugh Hewitt: After Mueller: The Tide Has Turned

After the latest testimony of former special counsel Robert Mueller, the tide has very clearly turned—and Trump now has a distinct advantage as we move into 2020.

No: President Trump has not yet been fully vindicated. Only his reelection will provide that.

But Trump has decisively repulsed the attempt to deny him the opportunity to win that vindication at the polls in November next year.

The president is now going on the offensive.

He’ll argue that the real scandal was the attempt to keep him from winning election and, once having won election, from governing. His opponents did so by shocking means far outside the norms of law and U.S. politics.

Trump will make this argument simply by force of repetition.

That the attack on Trump has decisively failed is not open to debate—except by people unfamiliar with “sunk costs.”

It was a terrible strategy from the start, that which the Democrats embrace, and it ended badly for everyone—except Donald Trump.

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Jerry Bowyer: A New Voice at the Fed

With economic commentator Steve Moore out of the running for Fed, President Trump has turned to another option, announcing his intent to appoint economist Judy Shelton.

Dr. Shelton is a superb choice.

Years ago, Shelton was one of the very few analysts to predict the fall of the Soviet Union long before it happened. Her conservative commitments are rock solid, having directed the Sound Money Project at the Atlas Foundation. Just last year she was successful in getting Senate confirmation as the U.S. director of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, so she’s already been thoroughly vetted—and would likely prevail in the confirmation process.

The stakes for the global economy have never been higher. We need a new voice at the Fed who can be a solid vote for the protection of monetary stability and who can handle herself at the table with the big boys.

Judy Shelton will do well. She should be confirmed.

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Hugh Hewitt: Echoes of Jefferson and Madison

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo recently hosted the nation’s second annual Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom.

From China to Iran to Burma and beyond, the forces of anti-religious pluralism are ascendant in many places across the globe. And yes: The struggle for religious freedom is ongoing even here.

The Ministerial will be an enduring mark of Pompeo’s tenure at Foggy Bottom. This, along with his new Commission on Unalienable Rights will continue to focus the agenda of liberties owed to every individual by virtue of their existence—primary among them being the right to exercise religious beliefs freely and without interference from the state.

On my program recently, Pompeo argued, quote: “Nations become stronger when they permit their citizens to exercise their core beliefs about who they really are.”

He’s echoing Jefferson and Madison—and deserves a hearty recommendation for doing so in our age of cynicism.

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Lanhee Chen: $15 Minimum Wage May Do More Harm Than Good

The Democrat-controlled House of Representatives recently passed legislation to raise the minimum wage from $7.50 to $15 nationwide.

While that might sound good to some, the reality is that such an increase may put up to 3.7 million people out of work, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

Particularly hard hit will be employees at small businesses, which are less likely to have the resources or profits to cover the proposed doubling of the minimum wage. While Democratic lawmakers had an opportunity to exempt the smallest of businesses from their bill, they declined to do so.

The proposed increase in the minimum wage may also have the effect of hurting teenagers or those who may just be getting started in the workplace.

Increasing the minimum wage may seem like a good idea. But like many of the ideas that progressive politicians are trumpeting, it’s likely to do more harm than good.

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