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Jerry Bowyer: On Hong Kong: An Opportunity to Show the World We’re on the Side of Freedom

In Hong Kong, protestors are risking their lives to maintain their independence from China. While they put life and limb on the line, they’re waving American flags and singing our national anthem. Right now, the United States is engaged in a trade war with that very same government that the people of Hong Kong are fighting against.

That’s why the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act should be passed and signed immediately. The bill, which has bipartisan support in the Senate and House, reaffirms our commitment to Hong Kong’s special status and sanctions those who oppress the city.

Both Nancy Pelosi and Mitch McConnell have signaled their support for the law, which is a rarity in modern politics. The people of Hong Kong deserve independence. Passing this bill won’t solve their struggle for liberty, but President Trump’s signature will show that the world’s sole superpower is on Hong Kong’s side, and on the side of freedom.

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Who Should Win the Nobel Peace Prize? Dennis Prager with Pete Hegseth

When it comes to preserving freedom and making the world a more peaceful, secure place, this group deserves the bulk of the credit. Who is this group, and how can we ever thank them? Dennis Prager invites Fox and Friends host and US Army Major, Pete Hegseth, to share the answer from his new video from Prager University. See it here and then pass it on to family and friends.

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Hugh Hewitt: Don’t Legitimize This Impeachment

There are three paths before Senate Majority Leader McConnell when it comes to any articles of impeachment the House eventually sends the Senate’s way.

One is short: a quick dismissal by the Senate.

One is long: an extensive trial that would let the president and his defenders expose wrongdoing by Democrats and their ”permanent bureaucracy” allies.

The third—the only approach that is obviously wrong but that may also be the most likely outcome—would be a far more limited trial that would serve only to reward Democrats for their bad behavior before reaching the foreordained conclusion that President Trump will not be removed from office.

There’s a lot of appeal to the first in my list: a long, deep dive.

There’s also a strong argument to be made for peremptory dismissal—think of it as a motion for summary judgment.

Whatever course Leader McConnell takes, he should take care to not legitimize this sham impeachment.

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Lanhee Chen: Warren’s 52 Trillion Dollar Medicare-For-All

$52 trillion dollars. That’s the price-tag for Elizabeth Warren’s plan to bring single-payer, government-run health care to America. And, believe it or not, that number may actually be a conservative estimate for what Medicare-for-all would cost.

Analysts across the political spectrum have panned her plan to pay for all of this. And it’s no surprise, given the details.

For example, she wants the IRS to do better at collecting tax revenue … 65 times better than even the best independent estimates suggest they can do. And even though she’s said the middle class won’t pay more under her plan, she’s calling for $9 trillion in tax hikes on payrolls—an increase that’s sure to affect job prospects and wages for the middle-income Americans.

It’s hard to believe that Elizabeth Warren’s plan stands any chance of being passed into law. But voters are the ones who ultimately have to guarantee that her ridiculous plan gets left on the ash heap of history.

 

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Election Reveals Greater Divide Between Red and Blue States

Townhall Review – November 9, 2019

Hugh Hewitt talks with Marc Lotter, director of strategic communications for Trump/Pence 2020, about election strategy.

Sebastian Gorka and James O’Keefe, Project Veritas, discuss the comments from ABC News anchor Amy Robach about the Jeffrey Epstein case.

Hugh Hewitt and Michael Oren, former Israeli Ambassador to the United States, talk about the threats Israel faces.

Sebastian Gorka talks with reporter John Soloman about his claims that former Vice President Joe Biden forced Ukraine to stop an investigation of a company his son was involved with.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with David Hall about his book, “Did America Have a Christian Founding?: Separating Modern Myth from Historical Truth.”

Dennis Prager and Mike Rowe, of “Dirty Jobs,” discuss career choices that don’t require college degrees.

Larry Elder talks with UCLA economics professor Lee Ohanian about the problems associated with a minimum wage.

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Michael Medved: Today’s Aspirants Should Heed Lincoln’s Example

Abraham Lincoln remains our most revered political leader, but even some of his admirers misunderstand his rise to power. They believe Lincoln only became president in 1860 because Democrats divided, and three major candidates split the votes against him. In fact, those three opponents drew a combined total far less than Lincoln’s hefty majorities in 15 of the 18 free states of the union—providing more than enough electoral votes for decisive victory. The only states Lincoln failed to carry were the fifteen slave states, which naturally opposed a candidate who said: “If slavery isn’t wrong, then nothing is wrong.”

In Lincoln’s re-election run in 1864, he won an even greater landslide: winning the popular vote by 10 percent, and carrying 22 of 25 states. His example reminds us that great presidential leadership relies on clear-cut majority support, not the cobbled together, squeaker victories that seem to obsess too many strategists and commentators as they look toward 2020.

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