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Lanhee Chen: Approaching COVID-19 With Grace and Patience

The coronavirus crisis has already exacted a significant toll on our country, with lost lives and lost livelihoods. Our economy is basically shut down, with millions joining the ranks of the unemployed each week.

I know that all Americans, like me, are eager to get back to life as usual. But this coronavirus crisis is one that will not end on our own timing. And we will need both grace and patience to carry us through.

We will not be able to restart our economy until the worst of the public health crisis has passed. It will be hard to convince people to eat out, shop at the mall, attend a sporting event or take that trip to Europe until they believe it is safe to do so.

So that means—as hard as it is—we wait at home for this crisis to end. With the confidence that this, too, shall pass.

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Owen Strachan: Signs of Hope in Treating Coronavirus

Chances are good right now that you feel like you’re drowning in bad news.

Here’s some seeming good news: in the midst of Coronavirus spread, it appears that some doctors are seeing a positive response to a new drug combination called, in abbreviated form, the “Hydroxy cocktail.”

In New York, one doctor has apparently treated almost 700 patients with good success. In response to this, the FDA per the encouragement of President Trump has given a green light for testing.

At Townhall.com, Kevin McCullough commented on these developments: “Use of the [cocktail] in the USA is already demonstrating life-saving results…due to the generosity (not greed) of “big pharma.””

We await fuller results from the “Hydroxy cocktail” effort. Here is something we know for sure: irrespective of partisan politics, we need good news.

Let’s not fall prey to mud throwing and cheering against our public officials.

If these reports are verified, let’s celebrate a win.

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Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and Our New Heroes

What does it mean to be a hero?

The dictionary defines a hero in terms of courage, achievement and morality. In practice, our culture’s heroes have commonly been sports figures, such as Olympians or military figures.

But heroism is really about doing the right thing and standing for the right virtues even when the world isn’t watching. Many of the most heroic acts undertaken in human history are unknown to me or to you or to history—but they are not unknown to God.

In this crucial moment, we need a new category of heroes. Today, our heroes include doctors, nurses, and medical staff on the frontlines of the global pandemic. They are putting their lives at risk in order to protect and extend the lives of others.

But the notion of a hero has expanded to those who are stocking the grocery store shelves and delivering our packages—people who are making the world work and trying to keep all the pieces of society together.

We’re seeing heroism where we never knew to find it before.

As a society, we don’t pass out gold medals to grocery store stockers or to X-ray technicians. But when you think about it, we probably should.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Next Phase in Response to the Coronavirus Challenge

Commendations to Congress—and especially Senate Majority Leader McConnell—on the massive rescue package.

America gets the message: Help is on its way.

But it’s time to do more, Congress. We need a phase four.

Phase one was the $8.3 billion measure on vaccine research.

Phase two was the bill that came from House Democrats—deeply disliked by Republicans but the Senate GOP passed it anyway.

Phase three blew the doors off the normally staid Senate, but will bring tangible help to American workers and businesses, now that it will pass.

But the country still needs a phase four. We need to respond to the purveyor of the plague: The Chinese Communist Party.

China is nearly equal to the United States in economic strength, and superior in stealth and ruthlessness.

The immediate fight is the virus. The larger, long-term battle is with a regime that allowed the virus to leave its shores.

This does not mean war. It means vigilance and deterrence.

It means phase four.

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