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Owen Strachan: “1917” and the Value of Honor

What gives meaning to our days?

The new film 1917 stages this question in the wilderness of World War I, an apocalyptic firescape. Two soldiers embark on an impossible quest, debating the value of medals for bravery as they go. A soldier who won a medal for valor but has turned cynical denies the significance of his award: “It’s just a bit of tin,” he says.

As the journey unfolds, he shows tremendous courage under fire. When he completes his mission, he hands over several small items from a friend. All that is left to remember his comrade is a bit of tin.

Sam Mendes’s film is deceptively profound. It shows the value of honor, of fighting when everyone else wants to hide, even if the call of death comes in amidst the call of duty.

There is something worse than dying or suffering.

It’s living without honor; living without courage.

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Albert Mohler: Roger Scruton: 1944-2020

Roger Scruton—the British conservative who was one of the most important conservative intellects of our day—has died after a battle with cancer, at the age of 75.

Scruton helped to shape the conservative movement, not only in the United States, but even more importantly, in Great Britain.

He became a conservative when he was a student in France. Much like that classic conservative Edmund Burke who was looking the French during the French Revolution, Scruton saw an entire civilization being torn apart.

He didn’t mean to become a conservative.

But he eventually became an intellectual at large, writing 50-plus books, lecturing and teaching in many different universities on both sides of the Atlantic.

He was attacked bitterly, but he was also recognized, having been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2016.

Sir Roger Scruton will be gratefully remembered.

Scruton taught us—in the title of one of his most important books—“How to Be a Conservative.”

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Dems Debate In Wake of Iranian Aggression


Hugh Hewitt talks with former NATO Commander Admiral James Stavridis about the Iranian attack on American forces in Iraq.

Hugh Hewitt asks Wyoming Congresswoman Liz Cheney for her perspective on the Democrat candidates’ perplexing non-response regarding the Iranian attack on American forces in Iraq.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Texas Senator Ted Cruz about the impeachment trial of President Trump now before the Senate.

Mike Gallagher and Cully Stimson, of the Heritage Foundation, talk about Apple Corporation’s refusal to unlock phones for law enforcement.

Dennis Prager talks with Daniel Hannan, European Parliament member, about the January 31st exit by the UK from the EU and the promise that holds.

Dennis Prager and Caroline Glick talk about President Trump’s Middle East Policy and reaction to the death of Iranian General Soleimani.

Larry Elder talks about the media reactions to the news emanating from the Middle East.

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Medved: An Opportunity for the GOP


A new Gallup Poll shows the Democrats’ diversity—not only in racial terms but in ideological outlook. The GOP remains overwhelmingly conservative—with 73 percent describing themselves that way and only 4 percent identifying as liberals.

Meanwhile, a full 14 percent of Democrats called themselves “conservatives” and another 36 percent said they’re “moderates.” While Democratic leaders drift to the left of their base, the GOP should target conservatives and moderates in Democratic ranks.

If you get a new voter to show up to vote Republican, that’s good—but it gives you just one extra ballot. If you convert a Democrat to your cause, you not only a bag new a vote for your side, but simultaneously take a ballot from the other side.

That’s the right formula for decisive Republican victory.

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Albert Mohler: Evangelicals and Trump 2020

In the run-up to Christmas, you may have seen coverage of an editorial in Christianity Today by the magazine’s outgoing Editor-in-Chief Mark Galli, calling for the impeachment of President Trump.

The editorial set off a whirlwind.

Galli called the president’s actions with regard to Ukraine, “profoundly immoral.”

“None of the president’s positives,” Galli said, “can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character.”

Many looking at this have said that what is evident is a split between an evangelical elite against President Trump and populist evangelicals for the president.

I’d argue that there’s a third category—that is American evangelicals who understand fully the moral issues at stake, but who also understand the political context and have made a decision to support President Trump, not out of mere political expediency and certainly not out of naivete, but out of their own analysis of what is at stake.

That analysis, rather than CT’s editorial, is likely to have real impact.

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