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Owen Strachan: A Radical Proposal for Thanksgiving

This week, we have the opportunity to do something truly radical: we can give thanks.

Thanksgiving long predates the founding of America. It’s a tradition that dates to the arrival of the Pilgrims in Plymouth. Following extreme hardship—including numerous deaths, conflict, bitter cold—a group of Christians decided not to complain against God, but to thank Him for his sustaining grace.

Over the centuries, Thanksgiving became more than an exclusively religious event. In the midst of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln made the occasion a federal holiday, a remarkable move.

In modern America, Thanksgiving signals for many an opportunity to come together with family and friends to enjoy the goodness of life. It’s a pause on the madness and delirium of our divided times.

In a time of entitlement, chaos, and self-focus, giving thanks to God is a radical act.

Be a radical this year: eat turkey.

Laugh.

Choose gratitude

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Hugh Hewitt: Framing the Trump Legacy

Donald Trump’s legacy will be framed by his actions between now and the inauguration.

He won in 2016 against all odds—and went on to four years of knockdown battles with the political, media and legal establishments.

He awakened the American people to the threat from the Chinese Communist Party, brought new peace and alliances in the Middle East, isolated the rogue regime in Iran and rebuilt the U.S. military.

He saw through three—count them, three—Supreme Court justices and more than 220 judges total. He can claim the first realignment since Ronald Reagan in 1980—all in the face of the most partisan impeachment in U.S. history.

His actions over the next 60 days though can frame his legacy and secure that place in U.S. history.

They ought to be focused on Operation Warp Speed delivering vaccines and therapeutics while the nation and the world witnesses a smooth transition of power.

It will be a glorious pivot in the story.

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Albert Mohler: Which Party Will Be Setting the Agenda in the Senate?

In the wake of the contentious 2020 election, the battle for the majority in the U.S. Senate looms large. That majority will be decided in the two run-off elections in the state of Georgia on January 5th.

Both of the Republicans are incumbents: Kelly Loeffler was appointed by Governor Kemp, replacing Johnny Isakson who had resigned for health reasons.

And David Perdue is running for his second term representing Georgians.

Neither of the candidates reached Georgia’s requirement of 50-percent plus one in the November 3rd election.

All of this matters tremendously:

Holding the majority in the Senate determines who sets the agenda. To put it this way, nothing can come to the Senate floor if the majority leader does not allow it to be presented for a vote.

Turnout is going to be key. It will likely be a very partisan vote, which means that one party or the other is likely to win both seats.

As we understand the issues that will come before the Senate, that matters immensely.

Keep your eyes on Georgia.

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