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Albert Mohler: One Family’s Sacrifice for Liberty


The New York Times recently published a story entitled “Wreck of the Juneau Is Found.” It’s about the discovery of the U.S. Navy cruiser Juneau that was blasted apart by a Japanese torpedo in 1942.

Even in the context of the millions and millions of casualties of World War II on all sides, the story Juneau resonates in a special way in the American memory, a memory of indebtedness to one family. One family that lost not one, not two, not three, not four but five sons on one day on one ship!

75 years later, the Juneau’s wreckage has been discovered but the American people’s moral debt remains: a moral debt to all those who have given their lives and have given their family members to the cause of defending liberty.

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A Look Back and a Look Ahead with Speaker Paul Ryan


Townhall Review – April 28, 2018

Retiring Speaker of the House Paul Ryan joins Hugh Hewitt looking on his accomplishments as Congressman and Speaker of the House. Michael Medved and Daily Beast columnist Gordon Chang discuss the evolving and historic developments between North Korea, the United States and the world. Dennis Prager questions if protests over political disagreements are crossing the line of civility. Michael Medved shares how James Shaw, the hero who stopped the shooter at a Waffle House restaurant in Nashville, Tennessee, continues to be a hero for the victims. Dennis Prager looks at a bill in the California legislature challenging the ability of religious traditionalists to provide services to those struggling with sexual identity or orientation. Hugh Hewitt asks Jeffrey Goldberg, editor of The Atlantic, about the hiring, then firing, of Kevin Williamson allegedly over a comment he made about abortion years earlier. Mike Gallagher looks at the unusual comments made by Toronto mayor John Tory during a press conference that followed the deadly automobile attack killing 10 and leaving 14 others hurt.

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Michael Medved: Is the New Cuban Government “Notably Diverse” or a Uniform Disaster?


The left cherishes a peculiar, pernicious concept of “diversity” as the New York Times demonstrated with its reporting on the new president of Cuba. The newspaper’s headline proclaimed “A Transition of Power in Cuba Sends a Signal on Diversity” and a caption to a photo declares “the members of the Council of State are notably diverse.”

Sorry, New York Times, but they aren’t diverse at all: every one of them is a dedicated Communist, with a slavish reverence for the thuggish, murderous Castro regime. The presence of several women and a few dark-skinned Afro-Cuban faces does nothing to alter the total ideological uniformity.

The diversity that matters to liberals is merely racial, while they ignore the more meaningful diversity of ideals and values, scorning conservatives and embracing communist Cuban thugs.

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Lanhee Chen: Paul Ryan One of the Conservative Movement’s Most Articulate and Thoughtful Leaders


Paul Ryan has announced that he won’t be running for reelection again this fall.

He was first elected to Congress in 1998 and during his 20 years there, has served the citizens of the First District of Wisconsin well. Even as he rose to become one of the most powerful elected leaders in the country Paul remained a humble man who is, above all, a devoted husband and father.

History will remember Paul Ryan for being one of the conservative movement’s most articulate and thoughtful leaders.  He fought for important ideas like a balanced budget, reform of our tax code and entitlement reform.

But I will remember Paul Ryan as so much more.  I had the privilege and honor to work with him when he was the GOP’s nominee for Vice President in 2012.  There is almost no one in public life whom I respect and admire more.

He will be missed.

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David Davenport: The Senate Is Broken


Former President James Buchanan called the United States Senate “the greatest deliberative body in the world.”  But Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana, recently complained that he hasn’t even been able to get a vote on a single legislative amendment in his first 15 months on the job.

The fact is that the U.S. Senate has largely quit deliberating.  The Senate has voted on only 6 non-budgetary amendments so far this year and has taken only 25 roll call votes in the two-year Congress, compared with 154 at this point in the last Congress.

Bills are held in secret until 51 votes are lined up and then sprung on the Senate.  Largely gone are the committee deliberations, debates and amendments.

Votes are taken largely to make statements for the next election, not to make great public policy.  It’s high time Congress returned to “regular order.”

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