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Albert Mohler: Social Media and Our Brave New World


Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has acknowledged that an app was able to gain and then to manipulate the personal data of about 50 million Facebook users for a political purpose. Zuckerberg said, “We will learn from this experience to secure our platform further and make our community safer for everyone going forward.”

Looming over this controversy is the entire world of modern social media.  In a way that even George Orwell and Aldous Huxley could not have foreseen in their worst nightmares, social media has lured millions and millions of us to surrender our own personal, private information to the world.

The most important thing to understand from this story is the two-edged sword of technology. Some technologies can bring about great good. Others bring about evil, but the reality is that even the most benign of technologies is still a technology that can almost always be misused.

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Hugh Hewitt: What Bolton Brings to the West Wing


The Beltway establishment has reacted with horror to President Trump’s appointment of John Bolton as national security adviser. Ambassador Bolton, they claim, is a dangerous warmonger unfit for the office.

That’s wrong. As the president’s top security aide, Bolton will be an honest broker and someone who can drive decisions through molasses-thick resistance. These qualities, plus his top-shelf intellect, make Bolton the best national security player to join Trump’s West Wing team so far.

The bottom line is that Vladimir Putin’s worst nightmare just walked into the West Wing. Bolton can outlast and outthink anyone Putin, Kim Jong Un or Xi Jinping sends to negotiate quiet deals before the big public ones with the president.

There are rough waters ahead across the globe and the president is to be commended for surrounding himself with strong, competent and very smart foreign policy professionals.

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Michael Medved: For Dems, Hunting Is Worse Than Abortion


A new poll by the Economist/YouGov organization shows glaring contradictions in the way Democrats define morality, with big majorities saying they accept abortion, divorce, gambling, drinking alcohol, gay sex, pre-marital sex and doctor-assisted suicide.

One form of behavior, however, drew overwhelming condemnation: 82 percent found “hunting animals for sport” to be morally wrong!

If this reflects a tender concern for all living things, isn’t it worth asking if a baby in the womb is a living thing? Even if someone don’t consider the baby to be fully human before delivery, surely that unborn child deserves as much respect as, say, a deer.

Yet Democrats find abortion more acceptable than hunting, by a margin of three to one—showing obtuse inconsistency at best, utter derangement at worst.

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Michael Medved: Why Democrats Are Suddenly Unforgiving Moralists


An Economist/YouGov poll asks respondents if they’d back “a presidential candidate who has done immoral acts in private life.”

A full 48 percent of Republicans find it acceptable, but only 19 percent of Democrats agree.  After three-decades of Democratic infatuation with the profoundly imperfect Bill and Hillary, this counts as a shock.

Yes, these attitudes reflect the polarized response to the current incumbent but other factors make the GOP less judgmental than the stereotype. More common identification with religion helps Republicans see “immoral acts in private” as nearly universal, so they pick the most capable sinner.

It’s liberals who view politics as life’s highest calling, while conservatives look askance at politicians in general, while feeling ready to trade a bit of private imperfection for a lot of public competence.

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A Terrifying Chapter in Austin and a First Amendment Battle at the Supreme Court

Townhall Review — March 24, 2018

Mike Gallagher talks about the Austin, TX bombing as well as this week’s shooting incident at a Great Mills, Maryland school that was minimized by a fast-acting, courageous officer. Veteran FBI profiler James Fitzgerald, goes inside the mind of the Austin bomber, just like he did with Ted Kaczynski, the Unabomber, who he helped stop. Michael Medved invites ADF President Michael Farris to share the latest on an important Supreme Court case with huge First Amendment implications. Julianne Benzel sits in with Dennis Prager to share about how her suggestion of having students protest abortion backfired. Larry Elder turns to Jesse Lee Peterson, a South Los Angeles community leader, author and radio host to talk about Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation of Islam, and his recent racial taunts against whites and Jews. Hugh Hewitt invites Jon Erwin, producer of “I Can Only Imagine” to share about his experience making the faith-based movie.

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Albert Mohler: A Law Compelling Speech

An important case before the Supreme Court this week points back to 2015, when the legislature in California adopted a law requiring crisis pregnancy centers to articulate an explicitly pro-abortion message right down to how women could contact the state about financial assistance in obtaining an abortion.

In short: It’s a law compelling speech.

Ilya Shapiro, representing the CATO institute, points out that it’s extremely telling that California has no comparable law requiring abortion providers to post advertisements for adoption agencies, or any other alternative to abortion.

We’re about to find out in short order if the justices of the United States Supreme Court mean what they say when they pledge to uphold the constitution of the United States—a constitution that includes the right of a citizen not to have a government coerce speech against conviction.

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