Home Page

Michael Medved: Black Panther’s Misleading Utopia

Opioid

“Black Panther” has made movie history as the first smash hit about a black superhero. But even as international audiences savor this splashy entertainment, it’s worth noting some necessary reservations.

 

The dialogue is full of clunky clichés, the plot is convoluted, the lavish sets and costumes look tacky and sometimes tawdry, and the special effects often fail to convince. Despite strong performances from a distinguished cast, the movie creates a totally fictitious African utopia that ignores fundamental truths about civilizations. The story centers on the fantasy kingdom of “Wakanda,” which, in carefully guarded isolation, has developed technological advances that lead the world.

 

In fact, isolation invariably produces stagnation, not progress. Moreover, Wakanda in the movie is a medieval, tribal society, choosing all-powerful rulers through trial by combat and magical incantations. In the real world, advancement and wellbeing grow reliably from democratic, free market institutions, not from authoritarian societies based on brutality and sorcery echoing Game of Thrones.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Chance of Big Change on America’s Political Landscape

Billy Graham

Can Americans be financially coerced to underwrite labor unions when they are opposed to positions taken by unions?

That was the big issue this week before the nation’s highest court—whether workers can be coerced to financially underwrite and undergird labor unions when the positions taken by the union would be opposed to their own convictions.

The case is known as Janus v. AFSCME—the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees—and it challenges Supreme Court precedent that goes back four decades, requiring persons in certain categories of employment to contribute union dues and fees even when they do not want to be members of the union.

Today, with Justice Neil Gorsuch on the court, it is expected that the court will reverse its 40-year-plus precedent.

This may mean a big, big change on America’s political landscape.

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: The Key Question on Trump and Russia

Shooting Florida

Let’s remember what all the Mueller, memo and FBI hubbub is about—the accusation that Trump colluded with Russia to get himself elected. One of the rules for determining who did something is to ask cui bono? Who benefits from the election of Trump?

 

Not Russia, that’s for sure.

 

The Trump trade has been terrible for Russia. We just published analysis at Townhall Finance which shows that Russia was the worst performing of the world’s 40 investible markets during Trumps 1st year in office. Poland—the Russian rival—was one of the best.

 

 

Trump policies have been highly detrimental to Putin’s interests. Most notable is Trump’s pro-energy stance, which Putin mouthpieces like cable outlet RT have been denouncing. If Trump really was elected by Russian money, it’s one of the worst investments any nation has ever made in human history.

Read More »

David Davenport: The Lost Art of Political Compromise

Compromise

Among many lost arts in Washington the most problematic is the lost art of compromise.

The dictionary says compromise includes the root word “com” or together with the word promise:  We make promises by coming together.  America learned this early, with the Constitutional Convention full of compromises.

But now members of Congress vote not to find the best solution for the country but the best platform for their next election.   Democrats threatened to shut the entire government over dreamer immigrants, while Trump was willing to see a shutdown over his wall.  And so it goes, politicians standing firm on one issue or another which they believe will get them reelected, and the whole of the federal government is held hostage.

We need more politicians like Ronald Reagan, who told House Speaker Tip O’Neill, “I will take half a loaf today, but I will come back for the other half tomorrow.”

Read More »

America’s Pastor Passes on to His Reward

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — February 24, 2018

Dr. Albert Mohler,  President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary,  remembers America’s Pastor, Billy Graham, who went on to be with his Lord this past Wednesday. Larry Elder and Constitutional law professor John Eastman address the latest indictments of 13 Russian nationals for election interference in 2016. Hugh Hewitt comments on Sr. Fellow at the Hudson Institute Lee Smith’s article in The Federalist on the disappearing media coverage of the growing Russian collusion scandal. Dennis Prager speaks with economist and gun rights advocate, John Lott, about the gun control debate surrounding the  Parkland, Florida massacre. Mike Gallagher invites Paul McQuillen onto the show seeking to have a civil discourse on politicians seeking political gain using gun violence studies as a foundation. Frank Luntz, a conservative pollster and political adviser, sits in with Michael Medved to discuss his observations of his recent “60 Minutes” interview and an Oprah Winfrey led focus group.  Michael Medved returns to call out his Alma Mater, Yale University, for some academic foolishness.

Read More »