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Michael Medved: A Vote Is a Terrible Thing to Waste

Opioid

When legal wrangling concludes, control of the Virginia legislature will be decided by drawing lots, or pulling names from a bowl—because of a tie vote in the 94th District. Republican incumbent David Yancey and challenger Shelly Simonds both got 11,608 votes but if the Democrat wins the draw, the legislature’s lower house will split 50-50, ending an era of Republican dominance. Imagine: if a single Virginia Republican had gotten off his apathy to go to the polls, the conservative—who won the district last time by 15 percentage points—would still hold the seat and, with it, the legislature.

 

On Election Day, a little-known Libertarian candidate who barely campaigned drew 675 votes. If this fringie had gotten a hundred fewer votes it would have changed nothing; but if just one of his deluded followers had backed the Republican it would have changed everything.

 

Remember: your vote is too precious, too powerful to waste on laziness or feckless gestures.

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The Tax Bill Needs Follow-On Spending Cuts

Compromise

Although a tax cut may have been a nice Christmas gift, it needs some follow-on spending cuts to work.  At best, Republicans have eaten their dessert first, waiting to eat their spending cut vegetables later; at worst, they will have increased the federal deficit by another trillion dollars or more.

 

By most estimates, even stimulating economic growth will not fully pay for the tax cut.  Republicans will now have to undertake the politically courageous step of cutting federal spending.

 

It will be difficult to make spending cuts without touching Medicare or Social Security, which President Trump has said are off limits. Meanwhile there is pressure to undo the sequester, automatic cuts on spending no one liked, but which have at least kept spending growth down.

 

Ideally, Republicans would have disciplined themselves to do tax and spending cuts at the same time. Tax cuts may come and go, but the federal debt remains forever, it seems. And—without spending cuts—it grows.

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Michael Medved: Trump Wins as a Mainstream Conservative

Opioid

Donald Trump’s first year in office delivered an array of important achievements: confirmation of conservative judges, including Neil Gorsuch; more support for oil pipelines and oil drilling; dramatic progress against ISIS; deregulation and enhanced border security; the end of meddlesome net neutrality; the recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital; and, most importantly, sweeping tax cuts and a new pro-business approach. What’s striking about these accomplishments isn’t how extraordinary they are but how normal: how consistent with well-established Republican goals and values. It’s easy to imagine that much the same policies might have been pursued by President Trump’s primary rivals—or by Mitt Romney, the last GOP nominee.

 

The two initiatives that caused most substantial disagreement with many conventional conservatives—canceling the Trans Pacific Partnership and unilaterally leaving the Paris accords—hardly defined ​Trump’s presidency or brought about the calamitous results his critics feared.

 

At year’s end, President Trump found historic success not as a radical outsider but as a sensible, determined, mainstream Republican.

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Albert Mohler: And What a Year it Was!

Headlines

It was the year that Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, and the year that Democrats declared “the Resistance.” The stock market continued to soar and the winds roared—it was the year of three devastating hurricanes.

 

Neil Gorsuch became the newest justice on the Supreme Court. Meanwhile, threats loomed in hot spots around the world, and the hottest of all was North Korea.

 

Controversy in U.S. sports centered on who did and who didn’t stand for the national anthem.

 

Harvey Weinstein was toppled in a sex abuse scandal, and was then followed by over 100 others, including a U.S. senator and several congressmen.

 

Those who died in 2017 included Charles Manson, Helmut Kohl, Glenn Campbell, Mary Tyler Moore, David Rockefeller, and R. C. Sproul. Meanwhile, just in the U.S., a new baby was born every 8 seconds.

 

May your house celebrate a happy New Year, in 2018.

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Trump’s First Year

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review – December 30, 2017

Hugh Hewitt invites Deputy National Security Director Nadia Schadlow, one of the principle architects of the recently released National Security Strategy document, to share some of the details surrounding this very important document. Dennis Prager identifies the opponents of the tax reform that was signed into law by President Trump. Hugh Hewitt turns to Senator Pat Toomey, who serves on the Senate Finance Committee, to share how this tax legislation will affect Americans.  Guy Benson shares with Mike Gallagher President Trump’s list of first-year accomplishments, including the “unheralded decimation of ISIS.” Dennis Prager shares from Ross Douthat’s New York Times article that exposes the media’s shameful lack of coverage of this victory over ISIS. Michael Medved unfurrels more of the Russian conspiracy and collusion, this time involving Green Party Presidential Candidate Dr. Jill SteinHillsdale President Larry Arnn shares with Hugh Hewitt the history behind “Darkest Hour,” a film about Sir Winston Churchill’s leadership and victory against Nazi Germany. Wrapping up the show, Michael Farris, CEO of Alliance Defending Freedom, sits in with Hugh Hewitt to talk about the Masterpiece Cake Shop case, one of the key religious liberty cases in our generation.

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Hugh Hewitt: 2017 And The Big Story Elite Media Missed

FISA

As we approach a new year, it is clear that 2017 will be remembered as a momentous year for news.

Perhaps the biggest story of the year will turn out to be this: How the United States defeated ISIS and its caliphate, and almost no one took notice.

When ISIS was roaring to power, under the watchful eye of the Obama Administration, no one could figure out how to stop them.

In less than a year, under the military guidance of the Trump Administration, ISIS has been defeated and Iraq and Syria have taken back large swaths of their countries that were formerly under ISIS control.

One would expect the mainstream media to cover this as they would the end of any other war. But—for the most part—we’ve heard only crickets.

The truth is reporting good news under the Trump Administration seems to be increasingly difficult for the mainstream press. They can’t even acknowledge when a major victory has been won.

Story of the year number one, defeating ISIS. Story number two? Losing the mainstream media. One is good. The other is horrible.

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David Davenport: Jerry Brown’s Blue Christmas

California governor Jerry Brown has been everywhere, preaching the gospel of blue-state California. California wildfires are the curse of climate change, he told 60 Minutes, while he whisks off to yet another climate conference in Paris, warning that the world is on the road to hell. He says the new federal tax cuts are a “monstrosity,” while he raises taxes at home.

Brown has turned California into a blue-state model of governance, but all is not calm or bright. Even with higher taxes and Silicon Valley growth, the state budget has a deficit and its pension deficit has grown dramatically.

Meanwhile jobs continue to flee the state in the face of high labor costs, high taxes and over-regulation. California has the highest poverty rate in the nation. The cost of housing is sky-high and the roads are old and gridlocked.

Much has been made of Governor Sam Brownback’s failing red-state experiment in Kansas, but Jerry Brown’s blue state Christmas left lumps of coal in many stockings.

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