Home Page

Michael Medved: Double Standards In The War Between White House And Media

Opioid

For all his vast power, the President of the United States is always at a structural disadvantage in a “war” with the media. The First Amendment protects press rights to criticize the government, and everyone expects such criticism. But if government—or the president, as head of government—strikes back by assailing media, there’s an uneasy hint of bullying or oppression.

President Trump isn’t exceptional in generating media hostility, but Barack Obama was exceptional in avoiding such scrutiny for eight years. What’s more, there’s a double standard on defining victory in battles between the administration and the press. CNN would celebrate if it ever won 20 percent of the available viewing audience, but presidential approval ratings of just 20 percent would undermine chances for legislative and re-election success.

A president can’t win by exclusively catering to his most enthusiastic base, but a cable news operation can’t lose if it solely rallies its hard-core fans.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/332115816″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: Americans And Contact Sports

U.S. Senate

The United States of America isn’t defined by Beltway or Manhattan elites, nor by those in Los Angeles or Silicon Valley. The mainstream media gets its cues from the collective consciousness of these four isolated reserves of great power, wealth and fame.

Donald Trump’s sparring with elites, though, is deeply satisfying to much of the rest of the country that doesn’t live in those four sectors… at least that sparring is satisfactory most of the time. There’s a limit, however, to how much good the president does by dominating media. The president met and exceeded that limit with the escalation of his war with Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski via tweets. These tweets were wrong because they were cruel. They don’t energize the base, except at its far fringes. They shrink it.

Americans do love contact sports. We swoon for heated rhetoric. If Trump can resolve to stay combative but back off cruel, it won’t matter whether he tweets once or 100 times a day.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/331975890″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Read More »

THR 7/8/17: North Korea Goes Nuclear

White House, Obamacare, shooting, Paris Climate Agreement

Hugh Hewitt interviews Richard Grennell concerning proposed actions that the U.S should take against North Korea. Then, Charles Krauthammer offers his solution to the potential nuclear crisis. Hewitt interviews an optimistic Senator Pat Toomey on what the Senate needs to do to get to “yes” on the Senate healthcare bill. Michael Medved interviews influential black journalist, Jason Riley, on how Black Lives Matter can make a difference at the ground level. Dennis Prager discusses Douglas Murray’s book, Strange Death of Europe. Medved presents new alarming government data which reveals how couples being married before children is no longer the norm. Hewitt, in celebration of the Constitution and Declaration of Independence, invites Larry P. Arnn to fill in for the late Harry V. Jaffa, who had been a regular 4th of July guest on the show for 15 years. Prager brings to attention the far leanings of the Left and how destructive it can be on societies like Canada, whose government has now recognized the first non-gender child ID card.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/332022955″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Read More »

Michael Medved: Infatuation With Obama; Rage Against Trump

Opioid

President Trump and his supporters are absolutely right that there’s a glaring contrast between the way media treat this president and way the press handled his predecessor, Barack Obama.

With Obama, potentially devastating scandals—Benghazi, the IRS, Fast and Furious, the VA—never gained momentum; the press never blamed Obama personally when things went wrong in his administration. For Trump, he’s blamed personally for every embarrassment or disappointment under his watch. But conservatives are wrong to suggest that the treatment of Trump is exceptional. George W. Bush and Bill Clinton also got rough handling by the press; it was the always-forgiving, generally glowing treatment of Obama that was exceptional, extraordinary, in fact.

Maybe it was his image as a “hip cool dude,” or his historical status as the first non-white president, but media infatuation with Obama set a dangerous precedent that distorts press-relations with the current administration.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/331733964″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Read More »

David Davenport: Free Speech Under Threat

Compromise

This summer, Commentary magazine published a forum on the question: Is free speech under threat in the United States?

Ironically, in a country where the Constitution and the courts carefully protect free speech, many people do not feel free to speak freely. Why? Because of a smothering blanket of political correctness that starts in our colleges and permeates our society.

Speakers with points of view that differ from the liberal orthodoxy are not welcome on many campuses, and in some cases have been subject to threats and violence. Students are supposed to be protected from so-called trigger words and microaggressions in the classroom. So much for free speech and the open debate of competing ideas.

The problem is that the First Amendment protects free speech from limitations by government, but the big challenges to free speech come from our culture and our campuses. It will take a strong fight to protect free speech, which is clearly under threat.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: Happy Fourth Of July

U.S. Senate

As we continue the long days of summer and of celebrations like the Fourth of July or family vacations, it is important to keep in mind that across large parts of the world the idea of either freedom or leisure much less both is so far off as to be the stuff of legend. For us, it’s a “taken for granted” annual ritual.

We are so blessed that we often simply forget to count those blessings and marvel at their largely uninterrupted enjoyment for 200-plus years. No, we are not a perfect nation, not even close, but we are the best hope of mankind, exceptional for all of our history and ever more so as the world collapses in so many places into abject barbarianism.

Our political leaders and our courts may disappoint. Our common culture may disparage our uniqueness, but the facts of history do not lie.

In the face of our many imperfections, we should all give thanks for living in this time and in this country.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/331381192″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Read More »

Protestors Call for Trump Impeachment

As the mainstream Democrat call to “resist” continues to battle against the election results in cities across America. The story talks of 46 separate “marches.”  Reasons for the call for impeachment don’t bother with the actual law regarding impeachment of the President.

 

CBS News

Read More »