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Michael Medved: Real Life Losses, Abstract Gains

Opioid

To understand why right-wing activists make a mistake in pushing deportation of so-called “Dreamers” we should consider the reasons for our consistent victories in defending gun rights.

For gun-owners, this is a personal issue—restrictive regulations are an interference, or an annoyance, with real-world impact. For those who choose not to own firearms, gun control is an abstraction—with no effect on the way you live.

Similarly, for 800,000 undocumented immigrants brought here as children through no fault of their own, the ability to get a work permit is a big deal, and fear of deportation is a direct concern. Meanwhile, it’s hard to see any personal benefit for anyone else in forcing these people from the country.

President Trump is right to ask Congress to protect the Dreamers.

Any action threatening negative consequences on a significant group of people, without offering concrete benefits to someone else, amounts to bad policy and terrible politics.

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Mike Gallagher: You’ve Got To Be Carefully Taught

NRA

Just a couple weekends ago in Belleville, Illinois, every single player on a football team of youngsters—eight years old and under—took a knee during the national anthem.

The coach, Orlando Goodin, said his kids knew all about why people were protesting in the streets of St. Louis over the acquittal of former police officer Jason Stockley. He saw a teaching opportunity—and explained Colin Kaepernick’s decision to kneel during the national anthem. The kids asked if they could do the same.

So, sure enough, when the national anthem played, these third graders immediately took a knee, their backs turned away from the flag.

There’s a line from the old musical South Pacific that says, “You’ve got to be carefully taught.”

You’ve got to be carefully taught to hate.

Coach Goodin chose to teach these kids to despise their flag.

You’ve also got to be carefully taught to love, taught to be grateful.

No: Not a one of us thinks this country is perfect.

But there’s a lot to be thankful for.

That’s the lesson we all ought to be teaching right now.

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Albert Mohler: Childlessness And The Future Of Europe

Billy Graham

The rise of childlessness is reaching increasingly alarming levels in Europe.

The Economist recently noted that “just 9 percent of English and Welsh women born in 1946 had no children. But, for the cohort born in 1970, the proportion is 17 percent. But now in Germany, 22 percent of women reach their early 40s without children; in the German city of Hamburg 32 percent do.”

The fact is, no society can survive without an adequate number of children being born, and that there is a very real prospect, as we already see in a nation like Japan, the childlessness leads to an eventual demographic and economic disaster.

The Economist, however, defends childlessness saying, “The childless are thus a small but useful counterweight to the world’s parents, who perpetuate social immobility by passing on their social and economic advantages to their children.”

Let me just point out that the only way to resolve that passing on of what’s identified here as social immobility is for the society to come to an absolute end through childlessness. That’s the embrace of nihilism.

Let’s face it for what it is.

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Lanhee Chen: The Bernie Plan: Too Good to Be True

Tax Reform

Senator Bernie Sanders has recently introduced “Medicare for all” legislation, which would enroll all Americans into the nation’s Medicare program within four years. Senator Sanders argues that his proposal would create a system that “works not just for millionaires and billionaires, but for all of us.”

As Democrats and other policy makers debate the merits of Senator Sanders’s proposal, here are a few important observations about international systems that they ought to consider.

First, a vanishingly small number of countries actually have single-payer systems. In fact, almost all feature some role for private-sector insurance companies and providers.

Second, single-payer countries have also failed to control rising health care costs. This is important, given that Mr. Sanders’s proposal was released without a cost estimate or financing plan.

Third, it is simply untrue that single-payer systems produce a better quality of care across the board.

All Americans should bear one important precept in mind: If the Sanders plan sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

For more information on why single-payer healthcare would be destructive to the U.S, please read this article, 13 Reasons Why Single-Payer Would Be a Disaster.

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Albert Mohler: Death And Down Syndrome In Iceland

Billy Graham

CBS News recently reported that the country of Iceland has almost completely eradicated Down syndrome.
What they really mean is that Iceland has almost completely eradicated people with Down syndrome.

The story explains, “Since prenatal screening tests were introduced in Iceland in the early 2000s, the vast majority of women—close to 100 percent—who received a positive test for Down syndrome terminated their pregnancy.”

There are many in Iceland, including some medical ethicists, who are trying to deny that this is really a big moral issue at all.

One medical authority in Iceland said this, “We don’t look at abortion as a murder. We look at it as a thing that we ended . . . And I think that is more right than seeing it as a murder — that’s so black and white. Life isn’t black and white. Life is grey.”

Well, actually this is very black and white. It is life and death. It is just that distinct. Iceland is murdering babies in the womb simply because they are seen as being genetically deficient, insufficiently valuable in order to have a right or privilege to be born.

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Trump Talks Tough at United Nations

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review – September 21, 2017

President Trump gives a speech of a lifetime at the UN General Council. Mike Gallagher invites North Korea expert Gordon Chang on his show to weigh in on Trump’s comments about the dangerous North Korean regime. Dennis Prager also looks at a few of the great moments of President Trump’s speech. Mark Davis invites Michael Anton, senior national security official in the Trump administration, to discuss how diplomatic and economic pressures are being applied to North Korea. Ben Shapiro shares with Michael Medved his disturbing experience while speaking at UC Berkeley. Mark Davis speaks with James Hohmann, a national political correspondent for the Washington Post, about Hillary Clinton’s new book. Jake Tapper, Chief Washington Correspondent for CNN, shares with Michael Medved about what cultural bias that hurts people on the Left. Dennis Prager laments about the breakdown of order which leads to a humanity that can’t figure out what gender actually is.

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Lanhee Chen: One More Opportunity For Health Care Reform

Tax Reform

After several unsuccessful attempts this year, Republicans have one last chance to deliver on their seven-year old promise to repeal and replace ObamaCare. Legislation recently introduced by Senators Lindsey Graham, Bill Cassidy, Dean Heller and Ron Johnson eliminates some of ObamaCare’s most unpopular provisions and enacts reforms that will help to lower costs, expand choices, promote federal fiscal responsibility, and put power back in the hands of states and consumers.

The Graham-Cassidy bill’s biggest strength is its adherence to the idea that states are uniquely equipped to design and implement the health care reforms that best suit their residents. It collapses the Obamacare federal funding into a single block grant, which states can use for a wide variety of health reforms.

Graham-Cassidy is not a perfect proposal. But Republicans no longer have the luxury of waiting for perfect. The legislation before them is the most thoughtful and conservative health reform plan they have encountered in their years-long effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare. Now, they must act quickly to pass it and finally get the job done.

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