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Hewitt: An Impressive Record of Accomplishments


President Trump has record of accomplishments that’s pretty easy to compile.

Most significantly, he has brought the existential threat posed by the Chinese Communist Party into the sunlight.

Trump has buttressed the constitution—with two justices on the Supreme Court, 53 judges on the federal courts of appeal and over 140 district court judges.

President Trump’s tax cuts—along with his massive deregulation—led to 3.5 percent unemployment until the regime in Beijing acted with criminal recklessness towards a virus that has devastated the world.

Trump’s brawling, slugging, tempestuous approach has worn down many, but his road is marked by these accomplishments.

The elites are convinced he must be beaten. But Americans want their jobs and security back. They like the police. They like civil order.

Yes: Polling shows him behind 50-year D.C. insider Joe Biden.

We’ll see.

I feel pretty good about President Trump’s chances.

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Michael Medved: “Peaceful Protest” Is a Contradiction in Terms

The mainstream media reflexively praise the civil unrest afflicting major cities across the country, using the term “peaceful protest,” without even acknowledging that the phrase is an obvious contradiction in terms. A picnic can be peaceful. A yoga conclave can be peaceful.

But a protest cannot—its very purpose is disturbing the peace, shattering calm and complacency, heightening tension and conflict, not resolving it. Dictionary definitions for the word “peaceful” are, number one, “peaceable”, and number two, “untroubled by conflict, agitation or commotion; quiet, tranquil.”

There’s nothing quiet or tranquil about what’s going on today. Yes, protests can be non-violent—Dr. King and the late John Lewis always stressed non-violence, even in the face of violent provocation. But the current demonstrations emphasize no positive goals or programs of reform, amounting only to angry expressions of unfocused rage. Naturally, there’s nothing “peaceful” in this process—a process which, in most cases, leads inevitably to violent destruction.

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David Davenport: Is Freedom On The Decline?

Each year Freedom House measures freedom around the world using several criteria. Unfortunately, its recent report showed the 14th consecutive year in which freedom worldwide has declined.

The world is full of more dictators and citizens possess fewer political rights and civil rights. Ethnic and religious groups are under fire. 64 nations lost ground on the freedom scale last year, with only 37 making gains.

Surprisingly, the U.S. is not the bastion of freedom you might think. Its score on the freedom scale is going in the wrong direction, from 89 two years ago to 86 this year. Nearly 50 other nations score ahead of us. Outside interference by Russia challenged our free and fair elections, while religious and minority groups battle for rights.

You can question the criteria, but whenever there is a test of freedom, we want the U.S. to score well.

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Lanhee Chen: We Need Patient-Centered Health Care Reform

President Trump needs to tell the American people how he plans to fix our health care system if he wants to win reelection. It’s an issue that many Americans care deeply about, and one that the President and Republicans should not be afraid to address.

The contrast between the Republican and Democratic visions for health care could not be more stark.

Democrats have called for more bureaucracy and more government control in our health care system—changes that have only driven costs higher and diminished choices for patients. But their interest in a single-payer, government-run system shows that Democrats have grander ambitions ahead.

In contrast, President Trump and Republicans want a health care system where patients and doctors—not bureaucrats—make critical decisions. One with more choices at lower cost. And a system where we have access to cutting edge treatments and cures.

The choice on health care is clear. Now, it’s up to President Trump and Republicans to make the case for why they’re right.

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