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Michael Medved: Inconvenient Truths on Tlaib’s Family and the Israeli “Occupation”

Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib previously embarrassed herself by falsifying the history of the Middle East—suggesting Palestinians provided a “welcoming haven” for Jewish refugees during the Holocaust.

But every historian acknowledges that local Arab leaders responded to Jewish refugees with murderous attacks, ferocious hatred and unwavering opposition. Now, Tlaib is at it again—with distorted portrayals of her own family history as well the general history of her people.

Israel had nothing to do with her father and grandfather leaving the Middle East: her grandfather fled for Brazil in the 1930s, before Israel was even established. Her late father immigrated to Nicaragua in the early ’60s, when the West Bank and East Jerusalem were still ruled by Arab Jordan, not Israel.

While Tlaib emphasizes the suffering of her family under the so-called “occupation,” it’s worth noting that two generations had already found homes in America before that alleged occupation even began.

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Jerry Bowyer: Getting Serious About the Economy

Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat candidate for president, recently warned that the U.S. economy might collapse in the near term.

I’ve recently completed extensive research identifying the conditions that tend to lead to financial collapses—what I call catastrophic losses. It turns out the kinds of environments which tend to lead to them are sudden shifts of policy in an anti-business direction and a weakening of property rights. Excessive taxation and excessive spending are also part of a toxic mix. In other words: Exactly the kind of hard-left turns which are associated with much of the Democratic field.

High taxes, big spending, expansion of government all severely raise the risk of collapse. The U.S. economy is resilient, but it’s not immune to collapse.

We should get serious about spending control and growth promotion because it can happen to us.

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Michael Medved: Pushing Guilt Over Gratitude on America’s Past

With much fanfare, the New York Times launched “The 1619 Project,” commemorating the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first 20 enslaved Africans in Jamestown colony.

The Times misleadingly announced: “Though America did not even exist yet, their arrival marked its foundation, the beginning of the system of slavery on which the country was built.”

This sentence constitutes a dangerous lie, because the new colony in Virginia hardly marked the beginning of the system of slavery but rather the continuation of an ancient, universal system that flourished in some form, everywhere, in 1619.

What made America unique wasn’t slavery, but the freedom and opportunity offered to most of the New World arrivals, resulting—within 150 years—in higher living standards, and more widespread liberty, than anywhere on earth.

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