ADF

Home Page

Hugh Hewitt: Amazon Should Dump the Southern Poverty Law Center


ADF—the Alliance Defending Freedom—has become the new ACLU in my view. They’re now the go-to organization to protecting, preserving and promoting First Amendment freedoms across the United States.

I’ve partnered with ADF for over a decade now. That’s why I was disturbed to learn that they have been removed from Amazon’s Smile program. That Smile program allows you to designate a charity of your choice to benefit from a small portion of your purchases on Amazon.

ADF—see them online at ADFlegal.org—is donor supported, so they could very much benefit from that income stream.

So why were they disqualified? Amazon has been leaning on the work of the Southern Poverty Law Center to determine who is and is not eligible for the Smile program. The SPLC has become little more than a fringe group of the left, though. It is not to be trusted.

It’s the SPLC that should be dumped.

Amazon should shift course—and shift course today.

Read More »

Chen: The President’s Prescription Plan: A Step in the Right Direction


President Trump recently announced his plan to lower prescription drug costs. It’s a solid plan that strikes the delicate balance between promoting innovation with the need to ensure that consumers have access to the medicines they need at a price they can afford.

Meanwhile, liberal politicians are continuing their calls for government price controls on prescription drugs, all while trumpeting the virtues of single-payer health care. Both policies would lead to lower quality care, more limited access to needed cures, and result in much higher government spending.

What our health care system needs is more competition to drive down prices. This plan helps.

The Trump Administration is right to focus on policies that speed access to the marketplace for generic drugs and new cures. Lower prices won’t happen overnight, but the policies the president has proposed will make a difference.

Read More »

Michael Medved: The Miraculous Truth About Jerusalem


Jerusalem is now the home of the United States Embassy in Israel, as it should be.

But our first diplomatic presence in Jerusalem began in 1844, when we established a one-man consulate in the holy city. Why a mere consulate, and not an embassy? Because Jerusalem at the time wasn’t the capital of anything-no separate Palestinian state had ever existed, and Jerusalem wasn’t even a provincial capital in the Turkish Empire that ruled the area.

The population of the destitute village was only 15,000, with more than 7,000 Jews and scarcely 5,000 Muslims. In other words, more than a hundred years before the rebirth of the modern Jewish state, Jerusalem was already a predominantly Jewish city – and still is, now that the population has multiplied to nearly a million.

As a world class center of culture and technology, the truth about Jerusalem is more compelling than any of the propagandistic myths.

Read More »

Phil Cowen and Jonathan Keller Discuss California AB 2943 Impact on Sexual Orientation Counseling

Phil Cowan invites Jonathan Keller, of the California Family Counsel to examine California AB 2943, “Unlawful business practices: Sexual Orientation Change Effort” that would ban the assistance of helping individuals with issues of sexual orientation.

Read More »

U.S. Fulfills Promise to Israel in Embassy Move to Jerusalem


Townhall Review – May 19, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and Lanhee Chen, of Stanford Law and the Hoover Institution, sit down to talk about the judicial confirmation process in the U.S. Senate. Phil Cowan invites Jonathan Keller, of the California Family Counsel to examine California AB 2943, “Unlawful business practices: Sexual Orientation Change Effort” that would ban the assistance of helping individuals with issues of sexual orientation. Mike Gallagher and Israeli businessman Mein Weingarten discuss the move of the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Michael Medved speaks with Michael Oren, former Israeli Ambassador, about the demonstrations in Gaza following the embassy move. Heather Mac Donald and Larry Elder hash out the latest regarding the “Me Too” movement. Homelessness is the topic discussed by Michael Meved with academic Sarah Rankin. Dennis Prager looks at an NPR who reporter gets tangled up while trying to cover up bias because the subject doesn’t cooperate.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: The Real Story of Election 2016


There have been a number of releases of late where we are seeing substantive investigative works of journalism on the 2016 election that blindsided the pundit and the political classes and gave us President Trump.

Salena Zito and Brad Todd in their remarkable book titled “The Great Revolt” have shifted the focus from candidate Trump to the voters who elected him president, creating the electoral earthquake of 2016. So did Dan Balz in the Washington Post.

All of this on the seismic shift in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin and yes, Ohio.

We’re starting to get a more nuanced picture of the “why” behind this quake. The key theme is status—a fundamental conviction that elites of LA, Silicon Valley, Manhattan and Washington wore a collective, fixed sneer toward their “lessers” between the coasts. Midwestern swing voters felt, to use the cliché from sports, “disrespected.”

This is the real story of 2016.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Jerusalem’s Palestinians: Drawing Them In, Not Pushing Them Out


With the U.S. embassy finally moving to Israel’s capital of Jerusalem, media narratives on the city’s history promote distortions, half-truths and outright lies.

According to one common claim, Jerusalem thrived for centuries as a Palestinian center before Israel seized the city in 1967. Such false claims are easily exposed by checking widely accepted census figures. In 1967, before Israel’s victory in the Six Day War, 196,000 Jews lived in Jerusalem, compared to only 55,000 Palestinian Muslims. In the next 51 years, it’s true that the Jewish population tripled, but the Muslim population grew even faster—exploding by an astounding 600 percent.

Far from pushing out Palestinians, Jerusalem’s economic development and enlightened governance drew them in by the tens of thousands, raising their living standards and educational level in the process.

Read More »