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David Davenport: Democrats Don’t Want A Revolution After All

In the twinkling of an electoral eye, frontrunner Bernie Sanders’ campaign is near death and Joe Biden’s has been resurrected. How could this happen?

Bernie said the American system needed a “political revolution,” and his revolution was “for all”: Medicare for all, free college for all, housing for all and jobs for all. The price tag was tens of trillions of dollars and a revolution in how America operates.

Even Democrats were not ready for that.

Perhaps it was about stopping the Trump revolution: a CNN Poll shows that 66 percent of Democratic voters thought Biden could best oppose Trump, 26 percent for Sanders. Or maybe concern over the coronavirus revolution changed things: the same poll showed Biden could best handle a major crisis by 65 percent over Sanders–at 23 percent.

It turns out 2020 is not the year for a revolution.

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Medved: The Power of Familiarity and the Race for the Presidency

After Super Tuesday, the choice for president narrowed to three well-known—and very elderly—candidates.

By time of November’s election, Donald Trump, Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders will range in age from 74 to 79; whoever wins will qualify as the oldest president ever inaugurated.

The decisive advantage for Trump, Bernie and Biden involves their name recognition.

Even before he ran the first time, Trump’s decades of celebrity status gave him decisive advantages since most citizens pay scant attention to politics, and instinctively prefer a familiar figure to names you don’t recognize. That’s particularly true at a time when most voters perceive the country’s doing well, or at least holding its own.

In that context, familiarity reliably trumps advanced age.

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Coronavirus and the Contest for the Presidency

Townhall Review – March 14, 2020

Bob Frantz and Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan talk about the reactions, maybe even fear-mongering, regarding the Coronavirus.

Seth Leibsohn talks with Steve Moore of the Heritage Foundation about the economic impact of the Coronavirus and the upcoming Presidential election.

Chris Stigall talks with Kayleigh McEnany, National Press Secretary for the Trump Campaign, about where the campaign is heading.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson turn to Thomas Homan, former Acting Director of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) about border security and its impact on the fight against the Coronavirus.

Mike Gallagher and Byron York, Chief Political Correspondent for the Washington Examiner, talk about Joe Biden’s gaffes and question if he’s up to the task of the rigors of a Presidential campaign, much less the Presidency, should he win.

Albert Mohler looks at how something like the Coronavirus can affect national security.

Dennis Prager talks with entrepreneur and French-Canadian Alain Lambert about the vaunted Canadian healthcare system.

Larry Elder reviews a few of Joe Biden blunders, gaffes, and misstatements.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Economy and the Coronavirus

While we all wait to see the long-term economic impact of the coronavirus, it worth a moment to look at the economic data before the virus.

By practically every measure, the economy in January and February was not only solid, but trending upwards. Trade war uncertainty was off the radar screen and job creation was well over a quarter-million per month.

House purchases were also trending up well.

Whatever economic problems this virus brings, it will be that natural disaster’s fault and not the fault of the policy mix.

Once we get past the anxiety about coronavirus, we’re likely to see a sharp and strong recovery.

The Trump administration has proposed temporary payroll tax cuts—an idea that should happen sooner rather than later, allowing plenty of time for people to feel the recovery before they go to the polls in November.

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The Politicization of the Coronavirus: Sebastian Gorka with Victor Davis Hanson

Sebastian Gorka and  Victor Davis Hanson, Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, talk about the politicization of the coronavirus.  They also talk about the professor’s recent lecture at Hillsdale about General George Patton, and how history needs more iconoclastic figures like Patton and President Trump.

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Lanhee Chen: A Healthcare Wakeup Call From the Coronavirus

Many liberals in America are advocating for Medicare for all, a change that would fundamentally transform our health care system to look more like the one in the United Kingdom.

But the global coronavirus outbreak has highlighted the weaknesses of such systems. The UK right now is bracing for hospital overcrowding, supply shortages and increased rationing of care if cases of the coronavirus continue to rise. Doctors quoted in a recent New York Times article expressed worries about how the British health care system would handle such an outbreak, with one intensive care doctor predicting that, “only those with a high chance of getting better would get near a ventilator.”

Liberals here attribute these challenges to a lack of funding. But that only highlights the problem with government-run systems—they only have a prayer of working if taxpayers are willing to pour more and more money into them.

That’s a prescription to break the bank … And our health care system.

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