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Albert Mohler: It’s Much Bigger Than Jack Phillips


Earlier this year, the nation’s highest court handed down a decision in the case of Jack Phillips, the baker from Colorado who had been found guilty by the state’s Civil Rights Commission of having violated the rights of LGBT persons by refusing to create cakes with certain messages.

The result was a seven-two decision in favor of Jack.

But now Jack—after the US Supreme Court victory—has some of the very same folks coming back for him again.

Alliance Defending Freedom—the group that successfully defended Jack Phillips all the way to the Supreme Court—is representing him again.

What you haven’t seen reported much is that this is—to put it succinctly—a scam. His opponents in Colorado have made a crusade out of pestering him with outrageous cake requests and then complaining to state officials when he refuses.

The issues here are much bigger than just Jack Phillips.

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Scandal Rocks the Catholic Church and the Guilty Plea of Michael Cohen


Townhall Review — September 1, 2018

Hugh Hewitt speaks with author Rod Dreher about the latest bombshell in the Catholic church; this time from a report written by a high-ranking Church official implicating the Vatican. Mike Gallagher tells the shocking details of a Cardinal downplaying the importance of this disturbing news. Michael Medved remembers former Vietnam war hero and P.O.W, Senator John McCain. Mike Gallagher exposes the media’s faulty news coverage of the Michael Cohen case, especially now that Lanny Davis, a former advisor to the Clintons during the 90s, admits that he misled the media. Dennis Prager looks at the Left’s desire to replace “toxic masculinity” with “Mr. Sensitive,” leaving nobody to fight evil. Hugh Hewitt turns to Chad Pecknold, a theologian and professor at Catholic University in Washington D.C., to discuss the deep corruption inside the Catholic church, and how Pope Francis, who is implicated, has not yet given a public response. Dennis Prager and Andrew McCarthy, Senior Editor at National Review, simplify the complex aspects of the Michael Cohen trial. Larry Elder and Los Angeles attorney Reeve Chudd give tribute to Aretha Franklin and her contribution to music, but also how important it is to have a last will and testament.

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Michael Medved: The Republican Challenge With Young Voters


Political analysts give plenty of attention to our partisan divisions according to race or gender, but not enough to the stark differences based on age. The good news for Republicans is that the Democrats are entirely reliant on young voters. Among Americans over 30 in 2016, Trump won the popular vote by a decisive margin, but among the 19 percent of voters below 30 he lost by a crushing landslide of 20 points.

The bad news is nearly all these young people will be voting again. Meanwhile, the over-65 segment—the strongest age group for Trump—gets steadily thinned by the actuarial realities.

Unless we can swing those youthful voters toward conservative ideas, emphasizing better plans for their present and future, the prospects for the Republican party may be grim.

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Hugh Hewitt: Underpromise, Overdeliver


“Underpromise. Overdeliver.” That has been my advice to every young lawyer and journalist I’ve mentored over a 35-year legal career and a 28-year broadcasting career.

That’s the same approach I would advise to commentators about the Paul Manafort conviction and the Michael Cohen guilty plea: They tell us a lot. They do not, however, tell us whether the president is going to be impeached.

He might be impeached. In fact, a Democrat-controlled Congress in 2019 would almost certainly pass articles of impeachment.

But we aren’t close to President Trump’s removal from office or his resignation.

What we do have, right now, are two admitted/convicted felons in Cohen and Manafort who are both in a position to grievously wound the president politically.

But anyone who says, “This means impeachment!” is either lying or looking for ratings.

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Michael Medved: McCain’s Memory Should Make G.O.P. Proud


The passing of Senator John McCain reminded me of why I feel proud to be a Republican. Beginning in 1980, the GOP has fielded nine presidential nominees, each of whom displayed exemplary patriotism and fundamental decency.

Ronald Reagan and George Herbert Walker Bush both ran for president three times, and Bob Dole, George W. Bush, John McCain and Mitt Romney campaigned for the White House two times each. Win or lose, these candidates won respect—even affection—from those who opposed as well as from supporters.

Despite many disagreements over policy, the bi-partisan praise for Senator McCain for noble service to his country reflects his noble character.

May the Republican Party continue to exemplify the principled tradition of “character counts.”

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