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Jerry Bowyer: The Economy and the Coronavirus

While we all wait to see the long-term economic impact of the coronavirus, it worth a moment to look at the economic data before the virus.

By practically every measure, the economy in January and February was not only solid, but trending upwards. Trade war uncertainty was off the radar screen and job creation was well over a quarter-million per month.

House purchases were also trending up well.

Whatever economic problems this virus brings, it will be that natural disaster’s fault and not the fault of the policy mix.

Once we get past the anxiety about coronavirus, we’re likely to see a sharp and strong recovery.

The Trump administration has proposed temporary payroll tax cuts—an idea that should happen sooner rather than later, allowing plenty of time for people to feel the recovery before they go to the polls in November.

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The Politicization of the Coronavirus: Sebastian Gorka with Victor Davis Hanson

Sebastian Gorka and  Victor Davis Hanson, Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, talk about the politicization of the coronavirus.  They also talk about the professor’s recent lecture at Hillsdale about General George Patton, and how history needs more iconoclastic figures like Patton and President Trump.

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Lanhee Chen: A Healthcare Wakeup Call From the Coronavirus

Many liberals in America are advocating for Medicare for all, a change that would fundamentally transform our health care system to look more like the one in the United Kingdom.

But the global coronavirus outbreak has highlighted the weaknesses of such systems. The UK right now is bracing for hospital overcrowding, supply shortages and increased rationing of care if cases of the coronavirus continue to rise. Doctors quoted in a recent New York Times article expressed worries about how the British health care system would handle such an outbreak, with one intensive care doctor predicting that, “only those with a high chance of getting better would get near a ventilator.”

Liberals here attribute these challenges to a lack of funding. But that only highlights the problem with government-run systems—they only have a prayer of working if taxpayers are willing to pour more and more money into them.

That’s a prescription to break the bank … And our health care system.

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Albert Mohler: Abortion Before the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States heard arguments last week in the first big abortion case since the confirmation of Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.

The case is known as June Medical Services v. Russo. It comes from a Louisiana state law—passed in 2014—requiring abortion clinics to have physicians who are recognized with admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Pro-abortion advocates are using the case to argue that if a woman has a constitutional right to abortion, then she must have a constitutional right to access to abortion.

It’s a very deadly logic.

Pro-life Americans seem not yet to understand what’s at stake in this case, but tellingly the pro-abortion side understands it full well.

The issues at stake are enormous.

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Albert Mohler: Senator Schumer Threatens Justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch

Last Wednesday, the Democratic leader of the United States Senate, Senator Chuck Schumer, stood on the steps of the United States Supreme Court as that court was considering an abortion case, and issued a threat to two sitting justices of that court.

Senator Schumer said, “I want to tell you, Gorsuch, I want to tell you, Kavanaugh, you have released the whirlwind and you will pay the price. You won’t know what hit you if you go forward with these awful decisions.”

That then brought a rebuke from the chief justice of the United States, John G. Roberts, and never was such a rebuke so well-deserved. Senator Schumer did what no American politician should ever do, he issued what can only be described as a threat to sitting justices of the United States Supreme Court and he dared to do it standing on the steps of the court as the court was in session.

That tells us a lot about Senator Schumer, but it also tells us a lot about the desperation of the pro-abortion side.

They know exactly what’s at stake in this case, and that’s why they are so desperate.

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