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David Davenport: The Green New Deal Looks Red to Me

Perhaps you’ve heard about the Green New Deal?  It’s freshman Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s revolutionary scheme to reinvent the entire American economy.  She calls it “the Great Society, the moonshot, the civil rights movement of our generation.”

But look a little deeper and you’ll see different colors:  the blue of progressivism and mostly the red of government spending and debt.  The proposal calls for a breathtaking $90 billion in green initiatives.

Even mainstream Democrats are hesitant about this sweeping effort to reinvent the economy and eliminate income inequality.  But media darling Ocasio-Cortez will make it front and center.

The first New Deal turns out not to have solved the Great Depression as we once thought.  We hardly need a new one. Is it green? Yes. Is it utopian?  Yes.

But mostly it’s the same old liberal blue of government spending and the red of more debt.

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Dan Proft: King’s Legacy Has Become a Shakespearean Tragedy

“If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as a Michelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry.”

That was Rev. Martin Luther King’s appeal to work as soulcraft in his 1967 “Street Sweeper” speech at New Covenant Baptist Church in Chicago.

All too often, it seems like those words are something close to blasphemy to Leftist elites who invoke his name while seeking to expunge from history those names King called forth.

Shakespeare—invoked by MLK—has today been dropped by Yale as required reading for English Literature majors. And Yale is by no means alone.

King argued the purpose of education was to, “teach one to think intensively and think critically.”

Today, the politicized professoriate would rather students not think for themselves at all.

It’s a Shakespearean tragedy for black and white alike that so few of today’s students do.

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Michael Medved: An Astonishing Legacy


During the holiday season, an astonishing legacy inspired Seattle. A single, childless social worker named Alan Naiman died of cancer at 63; he had become known to his friends for “unabashed thriftiness that veered into comical,” holding together his battered shoes with duct tape.

But when he died, he left $11 million to children’s charities that helped the poor, disabled and abandoned. He scrimped, saved and invested, while working three jobs, so he could help kids he never met.  Because he left everything to charity, government imposed no “death tax” on his wealth, but had he directed it to relatives, or even designated strangers, the State of Washington would have imposed its crushing estate tax.

This case demonstrates why government should keep hands off honestly earned, previously taxed life-savings, while honoring wishes of the deceased on their designated distribution.

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