ADF

Medved: When Politics Trumps Faith, Marriage Suffers

The New York Times Style Section recently ran a report called “Uneasy Bedfellows,” describing marriages that reached the point of dissolution because of arguments concerning Donald Trump. When I discussed the subject on the air, one astute caller noted that none of the couples featured in the story seemed to share a religious outlook, and he suggested that if they did, they could far more easily handle their political disputes.

My caller makes a good point.

Unfortunately, far too many Americans now use politics as a substitute for faith, treating party loyalty as a matter of uncompromising identity that provides meaning, transcendence and a sense of morality.

Passionate partisans on both sides see political disputes not as choices of policies or values, but as the ultimate struggle between good and evil. If couples worshipped a higher power together, they wouldn’t need to sacrifice relationships on the altar of either Trump or Clinton.

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Mohler: The Value of Human Life

Sometimes the story or image goes right through the mind and into the heart. This was the case last week with the photo of a little boy in Syria. He was covered in blood and debris, sitting in an ambulance—and he became the focus of worldwide conversation.

Nicholas Kristof, writing in the New York Times, noted that “If Syrian Kids Were Pups, We’d All Care.” He explains that he recently announced on social media that his family had to say goodbye to their golden retriever and received a “torrent of touching condolences.”

Conversely, he wrote column calling for international efforts to end Syria’s suffering and civil war—a war has claimed some 470,000 lives so far. The response? He said it was “a torrent of comments, many laced with a harsh indifference: Why should we help them?” Kristof is arguing that there’s a moral mandate to do something. Why? Every human life, he writes, “Is worth every bit as much as a golden retriever’s.”

We have to go further: Every single human life is infinitely more valuable than the life of every single animal.

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Trump and the Black Vote

Tariffs

The Wall Street Journal’s James Taranto joined the Mike Gallagher Show to discuss Donald Trump’s chances of winning over some of the black vote. Many polls have him winning 0-1% of the black vote, but a recent poll puts that percentage much higher. Will Trump’s new, apologetic and softer tone win over more of the black vote? Taranto and Gallagher discuss.

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THR 8/20/16: Trump Shakes Up His Campaign Staff

Opioids Tariffs

White House Correspondent for the New York Times Michael Shearer joins Hugh Hewitt to discuss Donald Trump’s shake up among his campaign staff. Larry Elder addresses the Milwaukee violence. Dennis Prager and the Wall Street Journal’s Daniel Henninger talk about the election cycle. Mike Gallagher turns to Pete Hegseth to look into the CENTCOM scandal. Michael Medved takes a closer look at the population decline in the United States. Author J.D. Vance talks about his book, “Hillbilly Elegy” on the Hugh Hewitt Show.

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Davenport: Obama Pursues Nuclear Danger for His Legacy

It’s the 4th quarter and President Obama wants to put points on his legacy scoreboard.  So, reports say he is considering executive actions that would significantly alter America’s nuclear posture.

The first is an end-run around the Congress: The word is he wants to go directly to the United Nations with a call to ban all nuclear testing. The Senate refused to ratify a nuclear test ban treaty 20 years ago, and certainly wouldn’t pass it now, so the president wants to use his voting power in the U.N. to change America’s nuclear strategy.

There are also reports he will promise that America will not strike first with nuclear weapons, again a bold stretch of executive power and a continuation of his misguided policy of announcing in advance our military strategies.  Even our allies are reported to be nervous about this one.

How disappointing that the president would act unilaterally to bolster his legacy at the risk of Congress’s proper role and the nation’s security.

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Chen: Affordable Care Act: Affordable?

Amid much fanfare, the Affordable Care Act—more commonly known as Obamacare—was signed into law in 2010. President Obama claimed that the law would both expand coverage to more Americans and lower health care costs.

More Americans have health insurance today, but with that has come more government spending and greater federal intrusion into our health care system.

So how about the law’s other goal of lowering costs?  It’s come nowhere close to hitting the target.

The president promised that Obamacare would lower health insurance premiums for a family of four by an average of $2,500 per year.

But each year since the law’s implementation, premiums on Obamacare’s health insurance exchanges have increased.  In fact, many Americans who get their coverage on the exchanges will see double-digit percentage increases in their premiums next year.  And premiums on the individual market will increase an average of almost 23 percent in 2017.

It’s no wonder, then, that Obamacare’s skeptics keep fighting to repeal the law and replace it with market-oriented reforms.

As well they should.

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Abortion Absolutism

Abortion advocates have long told the world that they will accept any truth that is proven by science.

An important story from Life News reveals that this is not, in fact, the case.

Micaiah Bilger writes, “Terri O’Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, was a guest on KIRO Radio host Jason Rantz’s show in Seattle, Washington. When Rantz asked O’Neill about abortion and the beginning of life, she replied that no matter what science proves, she still will support abortion.”

The radio host was apparently shocked and pressed O’Neill who said, “I don’t care. Of course I would support abortion.”

Even if science should affirm that abortion is the murder of a human being, she would still be for it. What does that tell us? Well, it tells us that religion can be used in more than one way. There are those whose religion is abortion and a woman’s right to abort for any reason or no reason at any time or at any stage of pregnancy is that religion’s constant and unequivocal creed.

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