ADF

Mid-Terms Reveal a Split Decision


Townhall Review – November 10, 2018

A look at the election with Hugh Hewitt and Robert Costa, National Political Reporter for the Washington PostDennis Prager looks at the Democratic spin on the election with John Fund, columnist for National Review. The gloves are off as the Democrats are again calling for “Impeachment.” Congressman Mike Gallagher talks with Hugh Hewitt. Salem host Mike Gallagher gives his analysis of the vote the day after the midterms. Dennis Prager speaks with Alliance Defending Freedom Senior Legal Counsel Kate Anderson about a case in Anchorage, Alaska involving a women’s shelter. Hugh Hewitt talks with Tyler Spady, a survivor of the mass shooting at the Borderline bar in Thousand Oaks, California. Michael Medved asks why “hate speech” is acceptable on CNN, or anywhere else.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: The Courts and the Fight for the First Amendment


The Supreme Court in the U.K. recently decided unanimously in favor of a bakery in Belfast where they declined to make a cake celebrating same-sex marriage.

You may think it sounds similar to the case of Jack Phillips here in our country.

That’s because it is.

Here at home, of course, Jack won at our high court—by a 7-2 margin in the Masterpiece Cakeshop decision, defended by the good folks at ADF, the Alliance Defending Freedom.

Jack’s story, the story of the U.K., the story of Baronelle Stutzman—the florist up in Washington state— all are just examples of how widespread these free speech and free exercise of religion issues are today.

The courts—at least for the foreseeable future—are the first and last line of defense for what our founders called “The First Freedom.”

The good folks need to stay fully engaged in the fight.

Read More »

Lanhee Chen: The Big Story Behind the 2018 Election


Americans turned out on Tuesday in big numbers to vote in a critical and hotly contested midterm election.

While Democrats were able to win control of the House, the big story is that Republicans will add to their majority in the U.S. Senate. 

That’s significant for two reasons:

First, the incoming freshman class of GOP Senators includes an impressive group of leaders like Mitt Romney, Josh Hawley, and Rick Scott who will stand for policies that promote economic growth, provide for a strong national defense, and advance conservative reforms.

Second, and perhaps more importantly, a Republican Senate means that President Trump’s appointees—in particular to the federal courts—will continue to be confirmed.  This is great news for those who value constitutional restraint and the rule of law. 

The 2018 midterm election was consequential indeed.  And its impacts will surely be felt for years to come.

Read More »

Michael Medved: The Kingdom of Kindness


I first learned about the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting hours after it happened, when I walked to my own synagogue’s Shabbat services near Seattle. Like other Sabbath observers, I was isolated from the news until I saw a good Christian friend who had showed up at our place of worship, standing vigilantly at the back of the sanctuary.

As it turned out, our friend Charlie—a marine officer, an NRA gun instructor and internationally renowned opera singer—heard the news and immediately took it upon himself to come to our synagogue to protect his friends.

His decision, like the other expressions of support for the Jewish community from good people across the country, reminds us how blessed we are as Americans.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: A Choice of Parties, A Choice of Worldviews


After all the arguments, all the acrimony and all the issues that have been discussed, today the voters of the nation make their choices.

In contest after contest across the nation, voters face a choice between individual politicians. But it is also a contest between political parties.

But beyond that, it is a contest of ideas… it’s a battle of world views.

It’s an oft-repeated adage, but elections have consequences. Voters who might be disappointed with the outcome of an election have only themselves to blame if they didn’t vote in the election that has disappointed them. Yes, character matters, personality matters, ideas matter, world views matter and elections matter.

Make sure your vote is part of election day 2018 as the nation makes a decision today.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: A Closing Argument Voters Can Feel


On the Friday before Election Day, the Labor Department issued a blockbuster of a jobs report:

Employers added a full 250,000 jobs to their payrolls; the unemployment held at 3.7 percent—a 49-year low.
This comes as year-to-year wages grew 3.1 percent: that’s the biggest gain for hourly wage-earners since 2009.
If President Obama had delivered this sort of jobs report the Friday before the 2010 midterms, every elite outlet would have given it non-stop coverage through Election Day.

But … today … the last thing we’d expect is fair coverage of an economy driven by legislation passed by a GOP Congressional majority and a Trump White House.

If voters needed one more reason to return those GOP majorities to the House and Senate in January, that jobs report ought to be it.

It’s a closing argument, along with Brett Kavanaugh, that voters can feel in their pocketbook and in their hearts.

Today: It’s up you. Get out there and vote. Vote today.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Our Obligations to the City of Man


On the first Tuesday of November every other year, Americans have the opportunity to exercise our voice—and our vote—in the ongoing American experiment of democracy.

Over the course of the last few years we’ve witnessed a heightening of the polarizing trends that have marked our electoral politics for the greater portion of the last two decades. The tone or the tension that marks our political discourse, I’m sure, turns off many voters.

So how should we respond on Election Day 2018?

As a Christian, my convictions are shaped by the great Christian theologian Augustine, who developed thought on our two citizenships—one to the City of God, one to the City of Man.

There is much more that could be said about this, but—given the fact that we live in a democracy—our minimum obligations to the City of Man are that we vote.

Make it a point to vote.

Read More »