ADF

Michael Medved: Gina Haspel Punished for Loyal Service?


Gina Haspel has been selected by President Trump as the new Director of the Central Intelligence Agency after serving the agency effectively for 32 years, under two Democratic and four Republican presidents.

But Democrats still oppose her confirmation because CIA policy after 9/11 called for enhanced interrogation techniques and she followed her orders in executing that policy. After Congress pressed to eliminate tactics like water-boarding, she accepted that decision too, and executed it without complaint.

For Democrats, in other words, it’s her loyal service to the agency, under both Republican and Democratic leadership, that disqualifies Haspel.

In fighting this patriotic, richly qualified nominee the Democrats are placing political gamesmanship ahead of national security.

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Iran Deal, Hostage Release and Elections Give Trump a Big Week


Townhall Review – May 12, 2018

Congressman Mike Gallagher talks with Hugh Hewitt about President Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the Iran nuclear deal. New York Times columnist Bret Stephens and Hugh Hewitt look at the Iranian reaction. Michael Medved examines former President Obama’s reaction complaining that the pullout was a “serious mistake” and accusing Trump of being “so misguided.”  As President Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong Un get ready for their upcoming meeting, three hostages held by North Korea were released and Mike Gallagher celebrates that news. Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley speaks with Hugh Hewitt about the rapid-fire federal judge confirmations. Michael Medved looks at how the low unemployment has created new employment problems for some cities…not enough workers. Dennis Prager has his take on the prom dress controversy and how the young lady who posted innocent pictures of her dress had no idea the storm it would create. Michael Medved looks at the reworking of school history textbooks to include the historical contributions by the LGBT community.

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David Davenport: A Dismal National ‘‘Report Card’’


The US Department of Education recently released national test scores for American 4th and 8th grade students in math and reading. They call it the “Nation’s Report Card.” I call it a dismal failure, no better than a D.

Only about a third of American 8th graders scored as proficient in reading and math, along with around 40% of fourth graders. And despite massive expenditures and countless reform efforts, there was essentially no improvement over the scores reported in the last tests 4 years ago. It’s been almost a decade since there was significant growth in the scores.

The new Secretary of Education is advocating more parental choice through charter schools and vouchers. In the face of these results, it would be hard to argue that it isn’t time to try something new. As Albert Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”

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Jerry Bowyer: The Latest Blunt Instrument of the Left


Amazon Corporation is looking for a site at which to build a 2nd headquarters, and they’ve narrowed the list down to 20 American cities. But a group which calls itself ‘No Gay, No Way’ is pressuring the company to knock Austin; Dallas; Nashville; Atlanta; Columbus, Ohio; Indianapolis; Miami; Raleigh, North Carolina; and Washington, D.C off the list. The problem is that the red states which are less likely to embrace special protections for sexual identity also tend to be low tax.

This is not about protecting gay Amazon employees. This is about power, about using economic intimidation to punish cities and states which have not yet submitted.

But if the management knuckles under to activists and rejects cities with better business climates, it does so at the expense of owners, employees and customers.

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Lanhee Chen: Homelessness Crisis in the Golden State

There’s a fine line between compassion and foolishness when it comes to public policy impacting the homeless.  Unfortunately, a whole host of cites cities—particularly in California—have crossed that line.

In San Francisco, liberal policies and neglectful elected officials have enabled disorder.  The homeless are camped out on sidewalks, public drug use is soaring, and some streets are littered with waste. In 2017, over 7,000 homeless people were found during a one-night count. And this year, there have already been over 8,000 requests to clean up human waste and another 3,700 to pick up needles left on the street.

We should be a compassionate society, but we also must recognize when our leaders have failed in their fundamental responsibility both to help those in need and to promote public safety.  The time for action is long past due.

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Michael Medved: Korea as Key to Victory for Trump and GOP


Over-confident Democrats take comfort in the history of mid-term elections in a new president’s first term: for nearly two centuries, the party in power almost always loses seats in Congress.

But Republicans should feel encouraged by the only exception to that rule since FDR: in 2002, George W. Bush defied history and Republicans gained strength in both the House and Senate. Low expectations for Bush in foreign policy meant that his strong response to 9/11 looked especially impressive.

If President Trump makes serious progress in upcoming Korea negotiations, he too could beat expectations and powerfully improve GOP prospects. Already, foreign leaders like South Korea’s Moon are promoting Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize and such talk could intensify as the election approaches.

Reduced tensions on the Korean Peninsula would be good for the world, good for America and great for embattled GOP candidates in House and Senate races.

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