ADF

Albert Mohler: Or Be Prepared to Face the Consequences


Just last month, Vice President Michael Pence, speaking on behalf of the Trump administration, stared down the nation of Turkey. In 2016, an evangelical pastor ministering in Turkey was arrested by government authorities and imprisoned. After being held for more than a year Pastor Andrew Brunson was finally charged with “dividing and separating” Turkey. Or—as Vice President Pence said, for “simply spreading his Christian faith.”

The Vice President spoke boldly: “Release Pastor Brunson now, or be prepared to face the consequences…” and he went on from there.

It was tough language— and it was language the Trump administration followed through on just last week. It’s what the defense of religious liberty requires in these times. This is exactly the message the world needs to hear from the land of the free, and the home of the brave. 

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Jerry Bowyer: The News on the Economy Is In


Economic growth has been significantly stronger than last year and has really spiked—up 4.1 percent in the last quarter.

Some say that the tax cuts had nothing to do with the growth spurt. But the fact that growth slowed  before the tax cut kicked in, and sped up after it kicked in shows that the tax cuts were the drivers.

In addition, a new report indicates that average Americans have gotten a 5.4 percent increase in disposable income. That’s partly because of the pay increase and partly because of the tax cut.

But it’s entirely good news.

When you consider the low unemployment numbers and the growth in capital spending, there’s substantive evidence that the decade of stagnation may be over.

 

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Countdown to Election Day 2018


Townhall Review – August 4, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and Senator Chuck Grassley talk about the push to complete confirmation of judicial nominations.  Hugh Hewitt talks with Congressman Jim Renacci about his re-election race. Michael Medved comments on 3-D printable guns. Dennis Prager asks comedian Owen Benjamin about liberal pressure on stand-up comedians. Larry Elder examines the Atlantic Magazine’s article, “What Putin Really Wants.” Michael Medved and Jay Richards, author of The Human Advantage – The Future of Work in an Age of Smart Machines, look to the future of Artificial Intelligence. Dennis Prager talks with Gregg Jarrett about his book, The Russia Hoax – The Illicit Scheme to Clear Hillary Clinton and Frame Donald Trump. Mike Gallagher and Dinesh D’Souza discuss his latest project, the film “Death of a Nation.”

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Hugh Hewitt: High Stakes in 2018 Election


We are just under 100 days from the November 6 midterms, and Republicans are in much better shape than most prognosticators imagined.

The president’s brand of political hardball upsets many in the GOP, even unbalancing more than a few.

But his commitment to originalist judges and a sizable military rebuild are the two most consequential aspects of his tenure. The economy is cooking, with a promise of a long stretch of economic growth above 3 percent ahead.

Electing Democrats to a majority in the House or the Senate at the height of that party’s lurch left would be a disaster: Impeachment, demands for massive income tax hikes, while also throwing the military rebuild into reverse.

It’s critical for Republicans to unite solidly behind Republican candidates, yes: even if you loathe the president, vote Republican.

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Michael Medved: “Corruption” in Context


News media portray today’s politics as incomparably corrupt, focusing on endless scandals to tarnish politicians in general and the Trump administration in particular.

But in historical perspective, corruption is far less rampant than in the past: prominent officials in the Johnson, Nixon and Reagan administrations faced criminal prosecution.

Around the world, top leaders in Brazil, France, Israel, South Africa and many other countries faced criminal charges for abusing public office; in lists of “most corrupt governments,” the US never scores among the worst. But media here love to dwell on scandal because it’s lurid and dramatic, and they also mislead the public with acclaimed entertainment series like “House of Cards,” “Scandal” and “Veep.”

The reality of our politics today is less exciting, but it’s also far less sordid.

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