ADF

Hugh Hewitt: Pompeo Nomination is Good News for State Department


On my first show for MSNBC last June, I sat down with CIA Director Mike Pompeo, now President Trump’s nominee for secretary of state. A quick read of the transcript will reassure any fair-minded person that a much-needed infusion of talent and presidential trust is on the way.

First in his class at West Point and an editor of the Harvard Law Review, Pompeo got key experience in the ways of the Washington swamp at the law firm Williams & Connolly before going as far as possible from it to Wichita to launch a successful career in business and then Congress.

Most importantly, Pompeo agrees with Trump’s priorities and understands that his job is to serve Trump’s agenda, not create one of his own. Like George Shultz with President Reagan and Henry Kissinger with President Nixon, the boss needs a trusted right arm, not a distant figure of uncertain commitment to core presidential goals.

Good news Pompeo at State!

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Lanhee Chen: A Potential of Breakthrough on North Korea

President Trump shocked the world when he agreed to meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.  While there’s reason to be skeptical of Kim’s motives and tactics, we should all acknowledge that the President has managed to secure a major diplomatic breakthrough in the crisis.

Now comes the hard work of making the meeting a productive one. North Korea has long dangled the prospect of disarmament in return for various concessions from America and its allies. Never before has the rogue regime been willing to keep to its promises, or to truly negotiate in good faith.  It’s possible the North Koreans are simply using the meeting as a ploy—an opportunity to make “asks” that will be impossible for American negotiators to agree to.

President Trump deserves credit for getting us to this point. But it’s important that he remains vigilant as we approach the murky waters ahead.

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Albert Mohler: Turning the Civil Rights Act on Its Head


Last week, the Sixth US Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 covers transgender persons even though they do not appear in the legislation.

The opinion was written by Circuit Judge Karen Nelson Moore who writes—and I quote: “the funeral home fired the employee because she refused to abide by her employer’s stereotypical conception of her sex.”

That ruling means that there is now no determinate meaning to sex or gender in the United States of America.

This is a direct threat to religious liberty because the Sixth Circuit said that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act has no bearing on this employment question whatsoever.

The moral revolution has but one great barrier to its complete victory: that barrier is religious conviction.

Watch closely.

 

 

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Hugh Hewitt: What to Hope for From a North Korea Summit


President Trump has agreed to go to a summit with the dictator of North Korea, Kim Jung Un. Those who have watched three previous administrations fail to curb the North Korean nuclear program are stunned and wondering out loud what could possibly come of such a meeting.

If Donald Trump comes back with any concessions it will be a major win for his foreign policy even as the destruction of the physical caliphate of ISIS achieved under his watch is in sharp contrast to the fecklessness of the Obama years. We are watching the renewal of a policy of peace through strength, and a key part of that is the massive budget increase passed by Congress earlier this year. After 8 years of appeasement, American power is back and deployed around the globe. It may be enough to bring calm to the Korean peninsula, or it may not work. Either way, it is preferable to the appeasement that marked the Obama years.

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Hugh Hewitt: The “Two Rivers” of U.S. Media

In late 1811 and early 1812, the town of New Madrid in the Missouri territory was hammered by three major earthquakes. “The ground heaved and pitched, hurling furniture, snapping trees and destroying barns and homesteads,” wrote Elizabeth Rusch in Smithsonian Magazine.

Like those earthquakes, the election of 2016 produced two “rivers” in U.S. media. One of those rivers is thoroughly inundated with anti-Trump, #NeverTrump debris and sediment. The other is almost wholly free of those ingredients.

It isn’t just cable news, the “two rivers” effect is mostly the result of the self-selected flows we direct ourselves to via Twitter feeds and chosen for us by Facebook’s and Google’s almighty algorithms.

The rise of partisanship on every issue, unmediated by respect for basic decency, is accelerating. Tapping the brakes, and eventually making a U-turn, is what the media need to do.

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