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Albert Mohler: A Thankful People

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In the year 1620, the brave souls known to us as the Pilgrims reached the shores of North America. They were fleeing persecution and seeking a land where they could worship God freely.

In the words of their chronicler, “they had now no friends to welcome them, no inns to entertain or refresh them, no houses, or much less towns… and they that know the winters of the country know them to be sharp and violent….”

For far too many Americans, the Pilgrims are something akin to cartoon characters, but they were flesh and blood human beings without whom we would not have the nation we enjoy today.

Despite all their dangers, they were a thankful people, and their thankfulness to God set the example that our nation has followed.

On behalf of the Salem Media Group, I’m Albert Mohler wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving.

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Murder at the Border

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review – November 25, 2017

Violence strikes again on the U.S southern border, this time it is the murder of a Border Patrol Officer. U.S Attorney General Jeff Sessions addresses the issue with Sam Malone, sitting in for Mike Gallagher. Fred Flietz, former CIA Analyst, now with the Center for Security Policy gives Rose Tennent, in for Dennis Prager, an update on the Mueller investigation. Robert Costa of the Washington Post shares the latest with the tax bill. Selena Zito of the Washington Examiner speaks with Hugh Hewitt about the harassment accusations against U.S Senator Al Franken. Michael Medved speaks with Arthur Brooks, President and CEO of the American Enterprise Institute on how to make the current tax system better. Hugh Hewitt invites writer-director Stephen Chbosky to share about his latest movie, “Wonder,” which has seen a roar of approval at the theaters. Lawrence O’Donnell, host of MNSBC’s The Last Word shares about his fascinating book: Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and Transformation of American Politics. Wrapping up the show, Michael Medved sarcastically reveals who his prestigious Golden Turkey Award goes to. Tune in to find out who it is!

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Albert Mohler: The True History Of The Holiday

Billy Graham

As Americans prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving Day, it’s a good time to be reminded about the true history of the holiday.

Perhaps we should not be surprised that in an increasingly secular America, there’s confusion about the origins of Thanksgiving. Some kids are now taught that the Pilgrims held a feast to thank the Indians. Afraid of appearing too religious, some are now calling it “Turkey Day,” as if it all comes down to poultry.

The facts speak for themselves: In 1621, the Pilgrims celebrated “the goodness of God” as they feasted with local Indians. In 1789 President Washington declared the first national day of Thanksgiving—asking Americans to “unite in most humbly offering our prayer and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations.”

So much for a secular holiday. These Americans knew to whom they were praying.

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Albert Mohler: SCOTUS Takes Up California’s Abortion Law

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The Supreme Court recently announced that it will take a very important case.

A California law requires crisis pregnancy centers to inform women who come to the centers of the availability of abortion, even requiring the use of specific language. Several of these centers have challenged the constitutionality of this California legislation, arguing that the bill violates their religious liberty, and their free speech, requiring them to state speech to the women who come into those clinics that violates their own convictions.

It is indeed the case that if a crisis pregnancy center in California can be required by law to use government mandated language about abortion, then free speech really doesn’t exist. If the government can mandate the use of language that violates the convictions of the very people who established and volunteer in these crisis pregnancy centers, then religious liberty doesn’t actually exist.

There is no greater moral issue faced by the generation of Americans now living than abortion, and the Supreme Court has decided to wade back into those waters.

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Jerry Bowyer: ‘ Trump Trade ’ Will Be Over Without Tax Cuts

Shooting Florida

The stock market had a great run after the election of Donald J. Trump as president. This put egg on the face of many elite commentators who predicted that a Trump victory would be disastrous for the economy.

Indicators of economic optimism also improved, and some business activity indicators improved in response. But lately plans for tax reform have been splintering into competing versions.

Some GOP leaders seem willing to cave on key issues such as whether to cut rates for the highest bracket and whether to delay corporate tax reductions. In response markets have leveled off, and there are some signs that growth is sagging too.

It is imperative that tax cuts be passed now and implemented immediately. Republicans will get no credit from the electorate for bi-partisanship if they sail into the next election with a weak economy on the horizon. It doesn’t need to be fancy. But it needs to be soon.

We’re past the time for rhetoric: we need successful votes and tangible policy shifts, otherwise the famed ‘Trump Trade’ may well be over.

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The True Story of the Pilgrims and Thanksgiving

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — November 18, 2017
This special edition of the Townhall Review features Michael Medved telling the compelling true story of the Pilgrims and Thanksgiving: why they left Europe, how they made their way across the ocean, and how they fought to survive in the New World while preserving their religious devotion to God.

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Albert Mohler: Thoughts And Prayers

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In the wake of tragedy, we are accustomed to hearing calls for “ thoughts and prayers.” We have heard them from prominent political figures, both Democrats and Republicans. But more recently, such calls have drawn harsh criticism from the Left.

What does it mean when a political leader says that the nation’s “ thoughts and prayers ” are with those who are in sorrow and grief? It could mean nothing. It could be a quick way of moving on without meaning to do anything.

Or it could be an expression of what is called “civil religion,” the common spiritual language of the American people. Robert Bellah, a sociologist at the University of California at Berkeley, famously argued that “every nation and every people come to some form of religious self-understanding whether the critics like it or not.”

Some critics clearly do not like it. Nevertheless, expressions of civil religion are necessary for a president of the United States — any president — who must lead the nation, sometimes as mourner in chief.

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